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Hand Planes Record or Stanley any views??

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Michel

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Hi,

just wondered what you all thought of the Stanley and Record hand planes, I've personally only used the Stanley ones and they seem to perform okay for the price.

Looking to buy a new jointer plane No 7.

So any opinions would be helpful :)

Regards

Michel
 

Adam

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Better still than a new jointer is an old jointer!

It's better made, and cheaper.

Remember, now the beancounters (accountants) run both Stanley and Record they have both cut any unneccasary costs. The years of leaving the castings on the shelf for a year for the stresses in the metal to relax after casting have gone. These days they probably machine them whilst the metal is still warm!!! (OK perhaps not that bad)

Give someone like Ray Iles, at the Old Tool Store a ring and he has loads of old ones, cheaper than a new one AND better for it!

My tuppence anyway....

Adam
 
A

Anonymous

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Michel,

I agree with Adam on this. I bought a new Stanley #6 a couple of years ago and the casting is horrible - truly horrible.

In January this year I bought a reconditioned #5 from Ray Iles at the Old Tool Store, and it's become my most-used plane. It's a great performer, has one of his thicker blades in it, and only cost £56 including postage.

If you really want to buy new, I'd recommend a Clifton at around £170 - their castings are nice and heavy and they use the old Bedrock style of frog, which is the same approach that Lie Nielsen use. Alternatively you could shell out the £230 or so that a LN would cost and be even happier.

After getting the recon #5, I've since bought a second-hand Stanley #7 and have been pleased with that too. The #6 is collecting dust and will get used for spares.

Cheers,

Afterglow
 

Midnight

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Hi Michael
I can’t say I’ve much experience with Record planes; the only one of theirs I have is a small block plane that seldom gets used these days. I’ve found that, like the Stanleys in my collection, their build quality is sadly lacking, but, if you put a ton of effort into tuning them, you can get them working reasonably well.
Re Stanleys....
Straight outa the box, they’re useless…. The backs of the blades are a country mile from flat, the bevels have been sharpened on fairly rough stones, the soles of the planes are all over the place, like the blades, far from flat. That’s the bad side.
On the good side, thanks to the poor quality of the steel you’re dealing with, correcting this mess doesn’t take too long.
To flatten the soles, I pinched some ideas I read from the “scary sharp” method; sliced open some sanding belts and glued them to an off-cut of kitchen worktop I had. Just used 4 grits; 40, 60, 80 and 120. I did the bulk of the flattening on the 40 grit, vacuuming the paper after every 10 strokes or so; the remaining grits got to work on the remaining scratches. For flattening, I left the planes fully assembled, but retracted the blades clear of the sole. Apparently removing the frog first isn’t recommended.
As for the blades, a couple of minutes on some good water stones keeps them fighting fit. I’ve found that the only GOOD side of blades made from soft thin steel is that their need for repeated honing gets you up to speed with sharpening REAL quick. Trying to learn on some Lie Nielson blades could take a lifetime.
While you’re at it, give the leading edge of the chip breaker a tickle on a course stone too to help prevent chips slipping between it and the blade.
I’ve 4 Stanley planes; the block plane is used as often as the Record, the #4 is a 40 year old model I inherited when dad died that really needs restoring, both the #5 and #7 work damn hard for their living. Both work reasonably well too, although you really have to wring their necks to get the most out of them. Their down side is that they don’t work at all well with highly figured stock. Their blades simply aren’t strong enough; blade chatter and tear out reign supreme, hence my expanding collection of Lie Nielsen’s.
 

Alf

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Well I'll put away my grease for The Slope then, 'cos it's already been said. :D Simple choice; buy a new Stanley and spend a considerable amount of time tuning it (or trying to), or buy a reconditioned one with a quality iron from Mr Iles, ready to go, for less money. Not a hard decision from my point of view, but I do understand that some people just don't like secondhand anything. In which case, as AG rightly says, a Clifton or -drool- L-N is your next option. Not that you especially need super flat soles on jointers, but having a blade that stays where it's put in a plane is kinda helpful :wink: There's a joke about modern Stanley irons btw; every workshop should have at least one to attract all the rust away from everything else... :lol:

I've no experience of modern Record planes at all (both mine are pre-war) but as I understand it the soles are still ground, rather than linished like the Stanleys (if I've remembered correctly), and they were still just superior to their black competitor. Whether that still holds true with the latest cost-cutting moves at "Irwin" goodness only knows, but take a guess... :?

Tool dealer links, Ray Iles included, can be found here. And while I'm at it, my homepage can be found here.

Cheers, Alf
 

Michel

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Simple choice; buy a new Stanley and spend a considerable amount of time tuning it (or trying to), or buy a reconditioned one with a quality iron from Mr Iles, ready to go, for less money.


In January this year I bought a reconditioned #5 from Ray Iles at the Old Tool Store, and it's become my most-used plane. It's a great performer, has one of his thicker blades in it, and only cost £56 including postage.

If you really want to buy new, I'd recommend a Clifton at around £170 - their castings are nice and heavy and they use the old Bedrock style of frog, which is the same approach that Lie Nielsen use. Alternatively you could shell out the £230 or so that a LN would cost and be even happier.

After getting the recon #5, I've since bought a second-hand Stanley #7 and have been pleased with that too. The #6 is collecting dust and will get used for spares.


Hello all,

Once again some great advice :D , going to give the Old Tool Store a call and see whats in stock will let you know how i get on

Cheers :D

Michel
 

Michel

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Can't get hold of Ray Iles at the Old Tool Store, tried yesterday and today,

must be on holiday, will have to wait until new year.

all the best :D

Michel
 

Adam

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I had a Bullnose arrive just a couple of days ago - I guess you must have just missed him going on his Chrimbo holidays!!

A_L
 

Michel

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Hello A_L,

guess i must of just missed him,

My TS2500 arrived today, I've started to assemble it and have noticed that the extraction kit only shows fitting instructions for the TS2000 and TS4010 was yours the same, just checking I've got the right one :?

Looks the business though :D

Cheers

Michel
 

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