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Hand plane rennovation?

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A

Anonymous

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Andy,

Hmm, good one. I have a feeling that you may be out of luck. Off hand, the only place I know of that renovates old planes at all is The Old Tool Store, and as far as I know Ray Iles paints his. :cry: There are instructions for doing it yourself floating about the 'Net somewhere, but I believe the only source for the japaning is (again and inevitably) in the States. :roll:

Just curious, but why d'you want 'em re-done? It'll do their value no favours and it certainly won't make 'em work any better. Mind you, I'm one of those people with a load of planes all missing their japaning to a greater or lesser extent; it just doesn't bother me.

Anyway, not much help but a good gloat on your part :wink:

Cheers, Jester
Bedrock-less in Cornwall
 

AndyBoyd

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My 606, 607,and 608 are pretty rust and I just like nice new shiney things I guess. The value is not an issue to me as I bought them for use and not for investment. The 3 mentioned above I got for a steal of 30 - 50 $ each (I used to live in the US), so I think rennovating them will make them look nice and increase their value. I thought since I'm getting those 3 done I might as well get the rest done, the guy in the US only charges 30 to 60 $ (postage would kill it of course!) per plane and I've been forward emails from delighted customers. He even gave me the jappaning recipe:

"Andy -

The original black japanning is asphalt based. When applied and then baked, it will form an almost glass hard surface. The original formula is sometimes referred to as "Pontypool Asphaltum". I make my own using the original highly guarded secret recipe. :)

http://www.paranoia-towers.com/alchemy/pontypool.htm

(knowing the ingredients ain't the hard part!)

To remove the rust, use electrolysis. Nothing else will neutralize the rust that has formed INSIDE the porous cast iron. Afterwards scrub with hot soapy water and a scotch brite pad. Bake to remove the water absorbed by the cast iron. Brush on about 3 coats of Japanning, letting it dry betewen coats. Then bake at no more than 400 degrees for 2 hours in an electric oven. A gas oven can be used if you first pre-heat the empty oven, then turn off the heat while the plane heats up. Turn the gas back on after the plane has gotten hot. (moisture in the gas combustion)

Do the above, or, send it to me! :)


PlaneWood by Mike_in_Katy
PlaneWood "

but as he states knowing what is japanning is not the same as being able to do it - just like hand cut dovetails huh?

Anyway thanks for getting back to me and let's hope this BB takes off I get a bit fed up of always using the ones at Fine Woodworking:
http://forums.taunton.com/tp-knots/ with talks of Dado heads, 110v , table saws with no guards or splitters and an NVR switch being a novelty, never mind feet and inches, I'm 37 and have never been taught feet and inches!

Greetz

Andy
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
And he gloats again! Aaarrgggghhhh...... You're killing me here, Andy. BTW, a search on the OldTools List Archive with "japanning" threw up alot of info.

Anyway, there is an alternative forum called #cough# UK Woodworking which you might like. There are a couple of members based in the Netherlands too, although I don't we've heard from one of them for a while. There's a regular chat on Sunday evenings at 8pm, and you'll be very welcome. If you mention the bedrocks though, you'll need to include <gloat> tags :wink:

Sorry Charley, but you've been coughing all over UK Woodworking and now it's my turn :p

Cheers, Jester
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
What are you lot going on about
Jappaning. electreoofhiw...........................................?
About three years ago I renovated a couple of planes. All the black bits were cleaned up with a wire brush, and then painted with smooth black hammerite, and they still look cock on.

Hope this helps
Doughnut

PS as it goes, I'm with jester on this one all my plane have most of their original japanning missing, but they can still take tissue fine shavings and leave a polished surface on most timbers. (Gloat intended)
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Not to get picky or anything but, before everyone rushes out and attacks old tools with a wire brush - Please Don't. I've seen more tools buggered up by some over-enthusiastic twit with a drill and a wire brush than I can spare time to feel sad about (no offence Doughnut. I assume you knew what you were doing). You're better off with a fine grade of wet'n'dry, some meths and patient application of elbow grease. A cabinet or card scraper is often very effective in removing what I call "crusty" rust, and some wet'n'dry wrapped round a block of wood will bring up a saw blade very nicely (go lengthways though).

For an example of what a little TLC can accomplish, take a look here.

Cheers, Jester
Who bought a nice crispy wooden smoother off a guy one week. The next week he'd covered the remaining ones in poly varnish. Aaaaaarrrrrggggghhhhhh :cry:
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I know what you mean about the wire brush assasination Jester. The bloke on the local flea market is obsessed with using one for cleaning everything, 'cos they make exerything nice and shiney. Useless, but shiney. :?
When i did my job, i used a small hand held brush for the awkward bits, and fine alu oxide paper for the rest

Cheers
Doughnut
 

AndyBoyd

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Thanks all, rest assured my 3 planes that need rennovation are extremely rusty, and I am looking to clean them via electolysyis and then having the Japanning done professionally.

The rest of my bedrocks are have the usual little spots of the japanning missing and I will probably leave them alone.

On my next trip th the US I'll probably take them with me and have them done, but a restorer nearer to home would be much more handy.

I'll keep you posted on the progress

Andy
 

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