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Hacksaw which to buy

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Dave Moore

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Eclipse/Stanley or Bahco.....
probably others but they would be my go to for replacements......
there's always plenty at car boot sales.....
Have they started up yet.....???

I bought a really heavy antique hack saw a few years ago.....bit of a faff to change blades but what a nice saw to use.....
I only buy Bi-metal blades now from prom manufacturers.....

sure miss them.....nothing quite like that here.....
Best blades I’ve ever used are Sandvik. About twice the price of others but well worth it. If one buys the Sandflex they don’t break easily. We used some on a job years ago for cutting dairy stainless steel pipe which is thin wall and plays havoc with saw blade teeth. Not a problem, we used them for about two weeks before they got blunt and we used them on carbon steel handrailing.
 

AES

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Best blades I’ve ever used are Sandvik. About twice the price of others but well worth it. If one buys the Sandflex they don’t break easily. We used some on a job years ago for cutting dairy stainless steel pipe which is thin wall and plays havoc with saw blade teeth. Not a problem, we used them for about two weeks before they got blunt and we used them on carbon steel handrailing.

+1 re Sandflex. I still have some left from some stock I "acquired". The only down-side to them is that they are bi-metal which means they need to be tensioned VERY firmly in the frame otherwise they tend to wander off line. For "easy" straight cuts I prefer either Eclipse or Sandvik's own hard steel blades. But that's just me. And such blades tend to break easily if the user doesn't really know how to saw metal (actually they can shatter).
 

stuart little

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I don't know if this helps or not, but I have (had?) a little Lidl electric screwdriver with a "rubberised" grip. Unfortunately I accidentally knocked over an almost full open tin of Acetone all over it. It "melted" the grip (and a lot of the rest of the plastic casing) to the extent that it's now unusable (but I've kept the internals and the battery as spares).

I've never had a hacksaw with a "rubberised" handle but suggest that, based on the above, if you do try Acetone to cure a sticky handle then you go VERY sparingly indeed. Though I guess that like lots of other plastics, that rubbery stuff comes in differing compositions, but even so "you have been warned".
I tell myself: "ALWAYS replace the cap", after several 'knock-overs'. :cautious:
 
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AES

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I tell myself: "ALWAYS replace the cap", after several 'knock-overs'. :cautious:
+1 Yeah, so do I - also after SEVERAL knock-overs!

(Perhaps my most disastrous was a tin of light oil, all over a water-type sharpening stone. I bought a cheapo, just to try. I asked several people what to do with an oil-soaked water stone, but the answer was always "bin it". Some people (me for example) just NEVER learn)!
 

Bale

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I have a measuring tape and a Canon SLR, both of which became horribly sticky in the 'soft grip' areas. I rubbed one with meths, the other with isopropyl alcohol, and the stickiness went completely, and hasn't returned.
That sounds promising, I'll give it a try. I've had the same problem on some guitar stands and synthesizer knobs. I now avoid anything with a rubbery feel to it (ooh-er missus).

Pete
 

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