Groundfloor sole plate cutting

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Mutley Racers

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Hi all. A bit of advice needed here please.

I am wanting to run a waste pipe for kitchen island and I want to know if it is possible or not.

So 1930's property with suspended timber floor on sleeper walls with joists skew nailed into the sole plate which is bedded on mortar and probably bitcherman. Would it be possible to cut a section of this out between the joists or would it make the sole plate twist? I cannot think of a structural reason why not apart from the above.

Thanks.
 

Mutley Racers

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Hi, thanks for your prompt response. I don't believe I would make it to the drain on the side of the house.

By asking this, are you saying the sole plate should not be cut then?

Regards Lee
 

Alasdair

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No I am not sure re soleplate cutting I just thought as they are sleepers it might be an easier option but if you don't have the fall to the outside then that idea won't work.
 

Jones

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If the sole plate is just a nailing member and is fully supported I can't see a problem, you could put a noggin or some strutting above if you want.
 

Mutley Racers

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Just spoke to an old carpenter, firm manager and he said no problem. I have thought about what you said as well so will do. These sleeper walls are solid and not honeycomb construction so not sure if that helps or not. Thanks for your help
 

Mutley Racers

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Just spoke to an old carpenter, firm manager and he said no problem. I have thought about what you said as well so will do. These sleeper walls are solid and not honeycomb construction so not sure if that helps or not. Thanks for your help
 

Alasdair

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You probably already know but use glue fitting waste pipe not the push fit. I had them push apart as some were used in my house when plunging the sink at later date. Luckily they were easily accessible. You dont want any leaks etc under the floor
 

MikeJhn

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The sleeper walls being solid does not help in any way, the reason for honeycomb construction was to provide ventilation and prevent rot in the floor joists, ensure air bricks are clear of debris.

Sole plates are generally only in compression so cutting a notch or similar should not be a problem, if you are going to take out an area from top too bottom I would recommend a strapping across the gap to bring back some integrity to the plate.
 
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Jonm

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If this is standard situation, wall plate on top of sleeper wall (as attached) then cutting it between the joists should be no problem at all, as others have said.
0C45E42E-FDBA-427D-91D8-0A1FDF7E93C4.gif
rs have
 

Mutley Racers

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Hi. I hope you are all well.

After a bit more advice if you may.

My client has decidedto replace the floorboards with some p5 chipboard. When removing the old floorboards the joists and the sole plates lift up off the mortar around 5mm. I have read that once the new floor will be down then this will add weight to it to seat it back on the mortar on the walls. I don't want it to move at all really. Would it be possible to tie the sole plate down with a strap going over the top of the sole plate and fixed into the wall below? Or, this won't be allowed due to it bridging the dpc under the sole plate?

Thank you
 

Jonm

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Hi. I hope you are all well.

After a bit more advice if you may.

My client has decidedto replace the floorboards with some p5 chipboard. When removing the old floorboards the joists and the sole plates lift up off the mortar around 5mm. I have read that once the new floor will be down then this will add weight to it to seat it back on the mortar on the walls. I don't want it to move at all really. Would it be possible to tie the sole plate down with a strap going over the top of the sole plate and fixed into the wall below? Or, this won't be allowed due to it bridging the dpc under the sole plate?

Thank you
I think strapping down would be fine, moisture will not travel along the steel and get to the wood. Use galvanised strapping. Alternatively you could fill the gap with plastic (or wood) packers but mechanically fix them to the sole plate so they do not work loose.

Edit - second thoughts, strapping down is better than packing.
 

Mutley Racers

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Hi. Thanks for the reply and advice. If I can use galvanised strapping then that is great. I don't want to pack the gap as that then takes the joists out of level. Want to keep them and the sole plate down!
 

Jonm

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Hi. Thanks for the reply and advice. If I can use galvanised strapping then that is great. I don't want to pack the gap as that then takes the joists out of level. Want to keep them and the sole plate down!
Just a thought, if it is a completely new chipboard floor then you may want to glue it down, it is the modern way. The idea is that the mechanical fixings just hold the floor in place and a minimum is used, prevents squeaks in the future. I have a new build house and the timber floors are all glued down. Four years and no squeaks yet. Not sure about gluing to old joists though. Absolute pain if they have to come up in the future.
 
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