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Grip-tite featherboard

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woodman-46

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Hi ,

I am in the process of buying an anti kickback device called a Grip-tite. It is a block with a powerful magnet that has flexible"wings" sticking out of it. These wings are pressed lightly against the wood to be ripped on the tablesaw and the magnet holds the block itself securely to the fence or the table. Steel fence covers can be bought as a kit to provide the magnet.I was once a victim of kickback and although it caused no injury it really shook me up. If anyone likewise is a little cautious this could be just the thing. There is a website called Grip-Tite on the internet and they have a video of it working. It can also be used for just holding timber tight against a fence for instance in resawing.
James
 

Noel

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James, I have shop made versions of these as well as using the real McCoy. But I'd never rely on them (or the Grip Tite) to prevent kick backs. They are great for acting as feather boards and do so very well. On a TS in a kick back situation they may go some way to preventing the stock being launched back horizontally but in alot of cases the stock is lifted off the table and flung backwards. OK, when placed above the stock they may help but will not prevent kickback, especially on larger items of timber, this is assuming that there is enough room left on the fence to place them (and the steel plate). The anti-kickback claim is more marketing than reality. For me anti-kickback is a properly tuned TS and proper technique. Kickback cannot be prevented but you can minimize the chances of it happening.
As I said, as feather boards they're great.
JMHO.

Noel
 

Noel

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Just had a look at the Grip-Tite site http://www.grip-tite.com/
The 3 pictures that illustrate the product leave me with 2 comments -
In the 2nd picture the guy is ripping a sheet of ply with 2 grip-tites placed at the edge against the fence - very limited advantage but might help a little.

In the 1st and 3rd picture will somebody please tell me how you are supposed to finish the rip cut safely? How would you get a push stick past the handles without laying it near flat on the table? As for a pusher, forget it.

James, I'm not rubbishing the product (used as a featherboard on the TS top) just the company's site

Noel
 

Travis Byrne

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woodman-46
I have to agree with Noel on this. Maybe a good feather board.
The best thing I have is a splitter on my table saw to prevent kickbacks. If the wood being cut pinches the blade, be ready for a kick back.!!!!!!!!!!
I don't have the grip-tite, so this just my thinking on the subject.

I sure understanding about kickbacks and the need for safety. :D

Trais
 

Brent

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I bought a couple of Grip-tites a few months ago.I'm not overly impressed by them.For small stock they do an OK job,but on anything of any size they didn't meet expectations.The magnets,while hard to lift from the table,tend to slide fairly easily.This is in part due to the Top-Coat I use on my table,but we have to use something to protect and make the wood move easily over the surface.After using the Grip-tites a few times,I found it easier and safer to go back to more tried and true methods.
Just my opinion,but I wouldn't buy them again.
Brent
 

Chris Knight

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My saw is all aluminium surfaces and unsuited to the Grip-Tites - short of kludging a metal fence etc.

I did however buy a GRR-Ripper and find that this performs pretty much as advertised. For pieces of any length one really needs two of them so as to be able to "hand over hand" down the board. I don't use mine a heck of a lot but there are some cuts where I find it a definite help.
 

woodman-46

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Hi again,

I am really interested in these opinions. If there are any more experiences keep them comming!

James
 
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