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Great British Woodshop - What do you think now?

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Newbie_Neil

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Hi all

I have now had a chance to see nine episodes of GBW and I must say that it is the best UK woodworking show that H & L have shown. Of course, special thanks must go to his NormNess for making it all possible by setting the standard.

For me, the big pluses have been recognising all of the tools (forget the tablesaw) and the way that he explains why he has used a particular joint. He is also not afraid to admit that he made a bad choice with his prototype and uses this as a positive to show how he has improved the final piece.

The minuses have been the lack of a saw available in the uk (I was expecting the Jet SS) and the way he will talk about something and then only show you the finished result. Oh, and his penchant for making cuts that are impossible without the guards being removed.

On balance, a very good show. Well done H & L.

Cheers
Neil

PS I didn't mention that four letter word once!!!

PPS I never did receive a reply from H & L or GBW about ***o b****s!!!!

PPPS Oops, sorry. :oops:
 

CYC

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You couldn't have written a closer description of my view Neil :wink:
I agree on every point. A very good show, best british woodworking show I have ever seen. I hope it stays on for as long as the NYW.
 
A

Anonymous

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In agreement here too. Easy to follow, makeable projects, quite impressed really.

Aidan
 
A

Anonymous

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I finally watched an episode this afternoon. Daughter (6) is off school and I'm (cough) working from home so that wifey can go to work herself. Not bad and well explained so ditto the comments above. Norm was on straight after and the fact that both use a table saw where most of us would go for a router (or band saw) does make me smile.

I was unlucky enough to see an episode of Cutting Edge Woodworker last night and found the presenting style utter pants. With H+L being invaded by house hunting tosh and ever increasing volumes of fishing programmes this was a waste of a DIY show as far as I was concerned.
 

Midnight

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Neil...

On the whole, I'd agree with you. I haven't done an episode count but being off work these past 2 weeks has given me the chance to catch some of them. Leaving aside the technique issues (they've been thoroughly thrashed out in other posts), overall I was left with the impression that this was another opportunity missed. Granted the program is well enough presented, the bacis joinery used is done in such a way that I feel confident that I could do that myself with minimal tooling or jig purchases.
The issue I have with each new project is the visits to the stately homes. OK, I'm all in favour of a little bit of history, but what's the point of showing you places like this, filled woth some of the best examples of THE best craftsmanship this country has produced, and then build something that's.... well.....not even close to the pieces discussed.
If our wealth of fine craftsmanship isn't to be used as the core idea behind each project, why devote all that air time to plugging the National Trust....

As for Cutting Edge... Trevor... I'm with you...

If this is the best we have to offer, Norm wont need to loose any sleep over maintaining his reputation of setting the bench mark.

Damn shame really.....
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Mike

Midnight":3q2u4tyn said:
The issue I have with each new project is the visits to the stately homes. OK, I'm all in favour of a little bit of history, but what's the point of showing you places like this, filled woth some of the best examples of THE best craftsmanship this country has produced, and then build something that's.... well.....not even close to the pieces discussed.
If our wealth of fine craftsmanship isn't to be used as the core idea behind each project, why devote all that air time to plugging the National Trust....
I remember reading somewhere that he used the visits to find a piece of furniture that inspired him and he would then produce the modern equivalent as opposed to copying the piece.

Cheers
Neil
 

sawdustalley

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I have watched most, if not all of the episodes so far - I must admit after first enjoying it, I am now getting bored of it, sure the presenting is good, but some of the "not so good programs" have so much more interesting projects such as Smith and Sweetman and Cutting edge woodworker.

I totally agree, I think its pointless looking at these fantastic examples, today he looked at an extremly clever library table that unfolded into a ladder. His version was a dull simple stool, which was dead looking made out of boring coloured oak with some silly flop down step, why bother?. Yeah, then he varnished it :shock:

I'm also getting FED UP with seeing the Trend Mortise and tennon jig being explained for about 2-5mins per episode (Use the bandsaw for once!) I think its been used in almost every project, and its just getting boring now "use this silly looking set-up bar blah blah blah"
 

Gill

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How I agree with you, James!

I never want to see a Trend Mortice & Tenon Jig again. I enjoyed the first few episodes but that jig seems to have insidiously taken over the whole series. Tonight I had to be awakened from my slumbers whilst David Free was buzzing around the jig with his router - not even "Boyz In The Wood" ever had that effect on me!

Tonight, Mr Free even talked about 'milling' some wood. Surely woodwork shouldn't be as mechanical as this?

Opinionatedly yours

Gill
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Gill

As you only come out of your bunker intermittently for fresh air, you couldn't possibly know that the Trend Mortice and Tenon jig has started on the road to world domination.

It is all a secret marketing plot by Trend to replace the Rat. All you do is start to use the same terminology as the "Ratters" and by association everyone will believe that the Trend Mortice and Tenon jig can do everything as least as well as the Rat.

My services have been secured by Trend to find out all of the weaknesses of the Rat in relation to the Trend Mortice and Tenon jig. To this end I am now in possession of most of the weak points of the Rat.

I fully expect the Trend Mortice and Tenon jig to achieve world domination by the 14th May. :wink:

Oh no, I think I've given the game away!!! :roll: :roll:

Cheers
Neil
 
G

Guest

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I agree that it can become boring watching David Free set up and operate the Trend jig but compared to trying to set up my Record morticer makes it look very attractive to me. I make my tenons on the radial arm saw,not
as tricky to set up as the record but the results certainly don't look as clean and effective as on the Trend. I don't think I will buy one but if I had seen it before buying the morticer I would have been more than interested.You must remember that these programs are not just aimed at dedicated woodworkers like the members of this site.
 

Philly

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Jaymar,
I have a "dedicated" mortiser in my shop-probably the worst tool I have bought! The fence/hold down is useless and constantly moves out of alignment and it is very hard work withdrawing the chisel. I have done all the tweaks, made a new seperate fence, new table, new clamping system and finally, an engineering x-y rolling table. Still this thing annoys and slows me down.
So when I saw the Trend jig being demo'd at Yandles show last year, I couldn't believe how simple and fast it was. Bought it straight away and haven't regreted it since. So I do understand why Mr Free uses his so much (as well as Trend being a sponser!!!).
Regards,
Philly

P.S. Does anyone want to buy a Mortising machine? 1 careful, half balding owner? No, oh well.
 
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Anonymous

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Trend jig, Trend jig............I must resist, I must resist..........I'm losing the battle.

Aidan.
 

frank

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neil i must get a trend jig , what dovetail bits should i get will it take up less room than the rat :D

frank :twisted:
 

Dewy

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With all the various comments about using a table saw that isn't freely availible in UK wouldn't it be nice if they made a series using only tools easily obtained.
Another idea would be for all the tools to be aquired from one source.
Not Sheppach etc but a DIY shed or similar.
Screwfix used to sponsor woodworking on Discovery H&L.
Being owned by the same group who own B&Q they could sponsor a series with a garage workshop only using tools from these 2 easy to obtain sources.
OK. it may not show high quality work but would show novices the limitations from using such kit.
No dado cutters, no rodents & all jigs would have to be made with the tooling availible.
This would be ideal for those interested in woodworking and they could see the 'minimum' cost of setting up.
 

Bean

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YES YES what a good Idea.................They could even cut a few joints using Hand Tools :shock: Just to show that when you start you dont need all those fancy power tools..............(Pushes cardboard in front of new jointer) :oops:

Bean
 

Pete W

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I'd strongly agree with that, too.

It would also be nice to see a long-term woodworking series that wasn't project-based. Which is to say, it could cover some projects but I'd like to see much more emphasis on techniques - joint-cutting and assembly, tool selection, use, care and sharpening, a discussion on dust-collection etc.

Most of all, I'd like one programme maker to credit us the viewers with some intelligence and not assume we have the attention span of a gnat. Do away with the 'creative' camera angles and ceaseless changes of viewpoint, and actually show us something interesting.

New Yankee Workshop is far from perfect but still, I think, the best. Great British Woodshop had some good aspects but ended up a pale imitation of NYW.
 
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It would also be nice to see a long-term woodworking series that wasn't project-based. Which is to say, it could cover some projects but I'd like to see much more emphasis on techniques - joint-cutting and assembly, tool selection, use, care and sharpening, a discussion on dust-collection etc.
Absolutely, I couldn't agree more Pete
 

Dewy

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Unfortunately Pete, TV programme schedulers don't like such programmes. They want to see a project because they have a much wider viewing audience than woodworkers. I started watching NYW because I found it entertaining & used to pull holes in it for using power tools for everything. Eventually I bought a table saw & built up til my garage is almost full. Now I need a shed to store all the garden tools that used to have pride of place in there. Making the most of a small space instead of having a 40'x40' workshop would be ideal.
The Workshop John Built had a good idea but was aimed at those with ten thousand pounds or so to throw around. Most people haven't got that kind of money. It was made even worse by the follow up series making most furniture from MDF (yuck)
I'd like to see a series staring with a blank canvas (an empty shed or garage) then building up the tools in the space availible. Making the benches then building simple projects as more tools are added. OK. This may cram many years for a normal person into one series but it would give some idea of what's needed.
I remember the great satisfaction I felt on completing my 1st coffee table, that was soon followed by small side tables to go by armchairs.
No more bending down but everything at the same height as the arms.
Once you know you can make one thing others soon follow.
 

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