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Got me lathe. Now what?

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Anonymous

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Can't thank everyone enough for all the helpful advice. In the end, I went to Ally Pally last week and got sold on the Perform CCBL. Seemed OK, but what do I know. I have been introduced to a chap who was a professional turner for 12 years. He's coming over on saturday to show me what's what. I've got no wood. Any ideas? What's a good wood to start with?
 

Alf

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Eric,

Cool 8) Lucky you to have someone who knows what they're doing to show you the ropes too.

As for wood, I always find unseasoned stuff is the most fun and best confidence builder. Nothing like those long streaming ribbons shooting over your shoulder :D But then I have a stack of firewood I can raid, and maybe you don't. I think probably beech would be my choice; nice tight grain and reasonably inexpensive. Pine is a good test of technique though :roll: I'll be interested to hear what the more acomplished turners suggest.

Cheers, Alf
 

Signal

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Eric,

where abouts are you?

I have some sycamore logs your welcome to if you
can pick them up.

Cheers

Signal
 

trevtheturner

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Hi, Eric,

I would suggest you start with some knot free pine to learn how to use your turning tools - you won't blunt them with that. But, if your tools are new they will no doubt want sharpening first - and that's an art in itself! Starting out in turning you will, I'm sure, find your tutor invaluable and I would supplement that with a copy of Keith Rowley's book "A Foundation Course in Woodturning" for when your tutor's not around.

Best of luck - buying a lathe your spending has only just started - look forward to chucks, jaws, grinder, additional tools, etc. etc. :lol: :lol:

Cheers, Trev.
 

Cutting Crew

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Hi, Eric,

I'll go with Trev on this one, get some knot free pine from a salvage yard, the bits they throw away or burn, check for nails and other stuff that shouldn't be there, get it on the lathe and practice your cutting skills. Keep cutting coves and beads, some with shoulders some without just to get the feel of the tools and what they can do.

Soft wood is less forgiving than hardwood, so it will teach you to be gentler with the tools and it is also harder to get a fine finish, then, when you can get a decent finish on the softwood look for some sycamore to start making things with.

Keith Rowley's book is excellent, there is also a video that goes with it, well worth the money. Look on EBAY AUCTIONS type in woodturning and there's usually one of his books on there.

Trev also mentioned that buying a lathe is only the tip of the iceberg, it is, but, before you rush out and buy all manner of different tools stick to the basic ones and get used to them. I have a David Ellesworth signature gouge on test from Crown Tools, with this I can turn a large bowl or platter from start to finish, you will often see turners workshops with lots of different tools, most of them used once then put in a rack to be forgotten. Buying lots of expensive tools often turns them into someone else's bargains when you come to sell them.

Most of all, enjoy what you do.

CC
 
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