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Good options for fixing to masonry fixing

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azk404

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Not exactly a woodworking question but everyone’s pretty handy here so thought I’d ask.

I need to fix some mild steel tube into different wall, floor and ceiling materials to use as cloths hangers so they need to be fairly heavy duty.

Two walls are old masonry walls which seems to crumble a fair bit before we re-plastered them and as these will be holding the horizontal tubes so I would like them to be solid.

Anyone know of some good solutions and products that would work well? I’ve heard maybe drilling a hole, filling with no more nails (for example) and inserting a fixing. After the filler had set i would then screw into the fixing.

Any other suggestions would be great :)
 

gregmcateer

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I'm not sure no more nails would suffice, but a thick, strong fixative, eg those supplied in a gun-application tube. Eg Sikabond.

One way is to spread the load using a piece of wood as a wall plate, then screw the tube holders onto the plate. Not to everyone's taste, but effective.

Another way could be to use resin setting bolts, (screwfix or tool station). This method can seem pricey, but is strong - often used for eg balustrades into concrete or stone steps, etc.

Or, if want to keep cost down, go old school - drill a hole a little larger than required, then insert a wooden dowel, (or just pare down a piece of scrap wood to TIGHTLY fit into the hole, then drill smaller hole in the wood plug, ready for your bracket fixings.

Hope that helps.
 

mr rusty

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Are the fixings in shear or tension (i.e. are they downwards or trying to pull out?) If shear, just screw and plug. If they are in tension and the wall is crumbly then resin is a good option. Use gunned resin (drill a tapered hole) and a piece of thread bar. Once set, fix to the thread bar and trim.
 

Phil Pascoe

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No more nails etc. being water based tend to work a bit better than heavier adhesives if the substrate is dusty - inject the stuff. work it around a little to pick up loose dust then stick the plug in and leave to dry.

As above, resin is excellent, or mount a wall plate on the best fixings - the best fixings won't be were you want them for the tube.
 

azk404

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I looked into the resin and threaded bolt option so I will probably go with that as it looks the safest, strongest and will give me that piece of mind... I think :)

The old school method sounds interesting, might give that a go somewhere else.

Its shear but I just want to be sure the weight can be supported so even so I think the resin option will be good. Its good to think about where the force applies though in the future.

Cheers all
 

hunter27

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Having spent most of my life fixing heavy things to walls (central heating boilers and radiators) :) I have found that very long screws usually work for well in plastic plugs unless you end up in a poor mortar joint. It is not unknown to have to use 3 or 4" 10s screws in red plugs to keep the hole tight, knock the plug well into the hole/ brick not just in the plaster. it is usually the surface of the brick that is crumbly. but as has been mentioned above fitting a piece of wood behind will give you more surface area and you could bond it to the wall with a building adhesive and also screw that back.
 

Phil Pascoe

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Spectric

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Chemical fixings, you can now get them that will fit a std goo gun so a special gun not required.
 

JobandKnock

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Another vote for resin anchors. I have used hundreds of them in recent years to hold steel angle plates (up to 225 x 225 x 10mm), large timber ledgers, commercial premises handrails, etc into at times very ropey masonry. Concrete screws are another option that can work well
 
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