• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Gold Paint

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Arnold9801

Established Member
Joined
26 Sep 2016
Messages
182
Reaction score
5
Location
Cornwall
Can anyone recommend a gold paint or spray even that gives a good metal finish?

I've used a number of different types/makes and have been disappointed with them not giving a very good "gold leaf/metallic" appearance.

They are about but with so many its difficult finding one I'm happy with.

Arnold9801
 

Cabinetman

Established Member
Joined
5 Jan 2017
Messages
2,103
Reaction score
1,074
Location
lincolnshire Wolds
I had the same problem, the paint I used to buy ( for lettering on signs) was changed to a water-based formula and it was rubbish. I buy little bottles in the US when I go there, they aren’t so up themselves about VOCs, the paint smells of chemicals, probably why it’s still really good to work with, luckily I don’t use it very often or very much. Ian
I’m sorry that probably wasn’t very helpful. I will find out the make of it, it’s possible you may be able to get it if you want to risk it!
 

Ollie78

Established Member
Joined
4 Aug 2011
Messages
837
Reaction score
310
Location
Wiltshire
Rustoleum do some special metallics. I don't know about gold but the chrome is super, well chrome. They have them in b and q. Expensive though.

Ollie
 

TheTiddles

Established Member
Joined
14 Oct 2007
Messages
2,683
Reaction score
600
Location
Wiltshire
Paint yellow and then Dutch metal, anything else is well, paint. It’s not hard to do and looks as close to gold without using gold
Aidan
 

Cabinetman

Established Member
Joined
5 Jan 2017
Messages
2,103
Reaction score
1,074
Location
lincolnshire Wolds
Paint yellow and then Dutch metal, anything else is well, paint. It’s not hard to do and looks as close to gold without using gold
Aidan
Hadn’t come across that, Dutch metal? Not doubting you at all, but they always used to say red was the undercoat for gold. Ian
 

TheTiddles

Established Member
Joined
14 Oct 2007
Messages
2,683
Reaction score
600
Location
Wiltshire
Hadn’t come across that, Dutch metal? Not doubting you at all, but they always used to say red was the undercoat for gold. Ian
Fake gold leaf, Dutch metal may well be the old fashioned name for it.
In the way that a blacksmith works iron, a whitesmith works silver, lead and pewter, a goldsmith used to be called a redsmith as very pure gold is quite red, but most don’t like that so they bias it to yellow with trace impurities for jewellery etc
There’s plenty of tutorials online now for how to do it
Aidan
 

Richard_C

Established Member
Joined
17 Oct 2019
Messages
573
Reaction score
247
Location
Cambridge
Duch metal is sold as "gold leaf" and works well. I use it on some turned sculptural pieces. You can use a proper seize as glue, I just use dilute pva. One coat, let it dry. Second coat leave a few minutes to go tacky then apply the leaf using forceps and dry artists brushes. There are various brands but fimo/staedlater is common, I get mine from a local art supplies shop because I would like them to stay in business, but amazon do it if there isn't a suitable place near you. About £7 or 8 for a pack of 10 sheets 15x15 cm. It goes a long way, you can cut or tear it and I always keep any small leftovers. You need to work in a dry clean still air place, I use my desk indoors rather than the bench in the workshop. For things that will be handled or maybe go outside I cover with a coat or two of acrylic varnish, it's not "proper gold". They do silver and copper as well, copper is nice and can be patinated with salt and ammonia fumes to get "mock bronze" effect.
 

J-G

Established Member
Joined
20 Jan 2014
Messages
882
Reaction score
201
Location
ATHERSTONE
In the way that a blacksmith works iron, a whitesmith works silver, lead and pewter, a goldsmith used to be called a redsmith as very pure gold is quite red, but most don’t like that so they bias it to yellow with trace impurities for jewellery etc
I have no idea how you came by that fake information Tiddles. - a Redsmith was someone who worked in Copper! 'Red Gold' is an alloy of Pure Gold with copper so will never be 'pure' ie. 24ct. Adding 6 parts copper to 18 parts 24ct 'pure' Gold will give you 18ct 'Red' Gold. So you must see that that is hardly 'trace' impurities.

Gold is alloyed with Silver, Nickel & Palladium as well as Copper to provide many different 'colours'.

The reason for using an 'alloy' at all is to improve the 'wear' since 24ct gold is too soft to stand up to everyday handling. Other than for 'bullion' ingots the only other time you will find 24ct Gold is in genuine Gold Leaf.
 
Last edited:

TheTiddles

Established Member
Joined
14 Oct 2007
Messages
2,683
Reaction score
600
Location
Wiltshire
From a jeweller, but I see very little to confirm she was anything but wrong!

Bullion does have quite a red tinge to it, especially under sodium lamps

Aidan
 

thetyreman

Established Member
Joined
4 Mar 2016
Messages
3,313
Reaction score
498
Location
North West
I got some cheap metallic spray paint from aldi a while ago, they did gold, silver and copper, it's one of the seasonal paints they only sell once a year, haven't actually used it yet but was planning on trying it out on some pine picture frames, I think they were about £3 each.
 

J-G

Established Member
Joined
20 Jan 2014
Messages
882
Reaction score
201
Location
ATHERSTONE
From a jeweller, but I see very little to confirm she was anything but wrong!
I'm also a jeweller, (or rather registered silversmith) seldom work in Gold but do know about alloying!

TheTiddles said:
Bullion does have quite a red tinge to it, especially under sodium lamps

Aidan
By 'Bullion' do you mean 999.99% Gold Ingots?

I'll concede that I've not looked at Ingots under Sodium Lamps :)

If you simply mean Gold sheet/wire from the likes of Cookson Gold - (Gold [any colour], Silver, Platinum & Paladium are all considered 'Bullion' when in the raw - unworked - state) then you will not be referring to 24ct Pure Gold but to 18, 14 or 9ct bullion which could be any variety of alloyed Gold depending upon what you asked for.
 
Last edited:

TheTiddles

Established Member
Joined
14 Oct 2007
Messages
2,683
Reaction score
600
Location
Wiltshire
Yep, literally bars of it, though even the platings we use on circuit boards appears a bit red to me
Aidan
 

J-G

Established Member
Joined
20 Jan 2014
Messages
882
Reaction score
201
Location
ATHERSTONE
appears a bit red to me
Ah... that's the key - - - each of us have different colour vision so what you consider 'red', I might not.

My father had no colour vision at all - everything to him was black/white/grey - whereas I have excellent colour vision such that when doing the Ishihara test, the doc could hardly believe that I got 100% in the shortest time he'd ever recorded.
 

envy77

New member
Joined
20 Aug 2020
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Location
Essex
Depending on what you're using it for you could try Rub 'n' Buff, which produces a very realistic metallic effect. It produces great results for things like picture frames, but is wax based so finishing may be an issue.
 

johnnyb

Established Member
Joined
13 Nov 2006
Messages
1,466
Reaction score
220
Location
Biddulph staffs
achieving a gold effect is an odd one. usually achieved with bronze powders and clear stuff.(lacquer) most gold paint use this method) gold im sure is available as a paint on powder product cant remember what its called! gold leafing is obviously a different and special set of techniques. you don't have to use gold leaf when gold leafing though. silver schlag etc. ps the size used can be oil based water based or traditional water gilding(which can be burnished to look like real gold!) ......all that glitters may or may not be gold!
 
Top