Gazebo: Bracing / Joining Post to Beam

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DanGLA

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Hi all, my first post here, so please go easy.. I will preface this by saying that this is my first foray in to any type of woodwork, but due to a lack of time to get someone in to do it properly i need to give this a bash myself.

I want to build a simple gable roofed gazebo using douglas fir. I've drawn up my plans in sketchup. The total dimensions are 340*260 plus roof overhang. I am using 150*150 for the posts and 200*150 for the beams. Due to my complete lack of skill, i wanted to do lap joints on both beams and then screw them down that joint flat on to the posts using countersunk 300mm timberlok (for example) stainless screws.. how many, 2, 3, 4 per post? I appreciate this is not the preferred method, and i should probably incorporate some sort of pegging or tenon or something, but I think that's pushing the boundary of what is achievable for me in the time i have. I am more confident with forstner bits and expensive screws. The posts will be anchored to a 6" concrete pad using stainless t-blade style anchors.

I really really didn't want to use knee braces. This is a low structure (<2.5m total) and is shielded on both sides by a 6 foot fence, and more generally by houses as we're quite overlooked. It'll make access more irritating, and I'd seen similar designs to my own using lap joints and without bracing. I hoped that would be enough and was about to buy my wood this morning, but something has made me pause and think that i'm pushing the limits on my corner joints and lack of roof tie to also then try and do the whole lot without bracing.

This morning i've added 125x125 braces. I won't rely on mortice and tenon, but will instead probably go with two 200-250mm screws side by side on a horizontal (and then vertical) plane through the brace and in to the post. Alternatively, i could do 45 degrees through the post and in to the brace, or vice versa, 45 degrees on the brace in to the post. Is any one better than the other?

I'd like to hear your thoughts, as i intend to order the wood today/tomorrow AM latest. I need to keep this simple. The roof will be 18mm ply or OSB3 (probably OSB with membrane and shingles.

Braced and unbraced shown below:

braced.jpg
gazebo_200x150unbraced.jpg
 

Darrenp

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Hi all, my first post here, so please go easy.. I will preface this by saying that this is my first foray in to any type of woodwork, but due to a lack of time to get someone in to do it properly i need to give this a bash myself.

I want to build a simple gable roofed gazebo using douglas fir. I've drawn up my plans in sketchup. The total dimensions are 340*260 plus roof overhang. I am using 150*150 for the posts and 200*150 for the beams. Due to my complete lack of skill, i wanted to do lap joints on both beams and then screw them down that joint flat on to the posts using countersunk 300mm timberlok (for example) stainless screws.. how many, 2, 3, 4 per post? I appreciate this is not the preferred method, and i should probably incorporate some sort of pegging or tenon or something, but I think that's pushing the boundary of what is achievable for me in the time i have. I am more confident with forstner bits and expensive screws. The posts will be anchored to a 6" concrete pad using stainless t-blade style anchors.

I really really didn't want to use knee braces. This is a low structure (<2.5m total) and is shielded on both sides by a 6 foot fence, and more generally by houses as we're quite overlooked. It'll make access more irritating, and I'd seen similar designs to my own using lap joints and without bracing. I hoped that would be enough and was about to buy my wood this morning, but something has made me pause and think that i'm pushing the limits on my corner joints and lack of roof tie to also then try and do the whole lot without bracing.

This morning i've added 125x125 braces. I won't rely on mortice and tenon, but will instead probably go with two 200-250mm screws side by side on a horizontal (and then vertical) plane through the brace and in to the post. Alternatively, i could do 45 degrees through the post and in to the brace, or vice versa, 45 degrees on the brace in to the post. Is any one better than the other?

I'd like to hear your thoughts, as i intend to order the wood today/tomorrow AM latest. I need to keep this simple. The roof will be 18mm ply or OSB3 (probably OSB with membrane and shingles.

Braced and unbraced shown below:

View attachment 103136 View attachment 103137
I would definitely brace it !!!
 

DanGLA

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Joined
8 Feb 2021
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Location
Glasgow
i thought as much.. that's why I have paused my wood order. I think i'll add the wood for the bracing and get on with it. I've seen plenty of examples of braces being screwed to posts or using lag bolts, so i'm not too concerned about that.

My approach of screwing down the two laps on to the beam to secure there - i appreciate it's not elegant or ideal, but is it acceptable, especially with the additional bracing? How many screws? 2, 4?
 

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