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Frame section query

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LyNx

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I received a quote a while back for a set of bi-fold doors and frame for the rear of the house. This came out very expensive in my opinion so i'm going to add this to the list of "things to do" for myself.

When they supplied the quote, i also received a drawing showing dimensions and frame sections etc. One thing that struck me was the for the door stiles the timbers were laminated from 3 pieces of timber. I have since lost the drawings but was wondering why it was laminated and not one solid piece. Would it increase the over-all strength that much laminating or do you think it had something to do with the ironmongery for the bi-fold??

Must try and find the drawings so i can post.

Andy
 

trevtheturner

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Hi Andy,

My first view of this!

It does occur to me that the reason for laminating might be to reduce/eliminate the risk of distortion in the frames, and to provide extra strength - particularly if the firm had the tendency to use a cheap/inferior quality of timber. No experience of this type of work, so just a thought FWIW.

Cheers,

Trev.
 

DaveL

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I would go with Trev's comment about being able to use cheaper timber by laminating it. Some of the doors sold in the DIY sheds are made from all of the odds and ends with a thick veneer on the face to make it look like solid timber. :shock: Just look at the top to see what I mean. :evil:
 

tim

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Andy

The drawings will help. Could be that the joinery requires laminations (or separate sections) for machining. Could also be just the way its drawn? Have you had a look at the Hafele website in their sliding door gear section? Lots of drawings there - may be come clearer then.

Cheers

Tim
 

LyNx

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Thanks for the replies :wink:

I have found the section drawings again, and they do laminate the frame sections. It states that it's to increase strength etc, but for all the external windows and doors i've made it's always been 1 piece of solid.

Don't really want to post a link as the company may not appreciate this.

Andy
 

Chris Knight

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Andy,

Did it save on machining the stiles with rebates etc? I wouldn't have thought strength was much of an issue either way.
 

LyNx

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chris, it didn't, this is why i don't understand the logic. Must cost more in the long run for material and processing.

andy
 

Mcluma

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Well actually, laminating is costing extra, but the overall strength achieved is phenomenal. When I build my cabin I made laminated roof trusses, by doing so I could expand the span and made the trusses lighter, but still hold and increase the stability of the trusses

Laminating also counteract all forces happening within the wood, giving it a more stable piece of wood.

That your quote was so high has something to do with the high professionalism of the company and quality of wood used. I wouldn’t be surprised if they also used very high quality of ironmongery on the doors


McLuma
 

wizer

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Stupid Question Time:

Could someone explain.. Laminating? :oops:
 

DaveL

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WiZeR,

Think of ply wood, to glue up thin sections to make the size required. Used a lot for sheet stuff, used less to bigger sections.
I have seen roof timbers in some halls where thin (1/2"~1") timber is laminated to give the required (12"~18") size of beam, as McLuma mentioned for his cabin. Gives a very strong beam that usually looks good as well.
 

trevtheturner

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Sticking bits of wood together to make the whole stronger and more stable, like plywood. Or to bend thin pieces, stuck together, to achieve a desired shape. :wink:

Cheers,

Trev.
 
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