Forza Segoni-Smith bandsaw

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disco_monkey79

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Hi, and merry Christmas to you all.

I just picked up a vintage Forza Segoni-Smith bandsaw. Not sure of its age - from the styling I'd guess anywhere from '50s to' 70s.

I've had a google, but can't find any info (although I did find Forza bandsaw blades for sale in rolls).

Can anyone share any info on it? Its age? Blade length? Anything really, as I'd never heard of this make. (I will measure the blade on it, but that's assuming I can do it accurately, and it has the right one fitted!) I'm guessing Smith and Co imported it and re-badged it.

Oh, and it is EXTREMELY heavy. I only just got it from truck to door.

Thanks, stay safe and healthy.
 

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disco_monkey79

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A quick update - the frame is cast iron (hence the crippling weight) and the door is some alloy.
The motor runs and sounds healthy, and there's no discernible play in the wheel bearings.
The bad news is some bolts are seized - I can't currently adjust the height of the blade guide. It may be drilled out and re tapped.
The thumb screws holding the blade guides were seized, but a soaking in white spirit has freed them.
However, I can't now budge the cylindrical guides. Perhaps the oil soaking has made them swell?

Can anyone tell me what material they are/should be? Vulcanite? I may need to drill them out and replace them.

Once they've been freed/replaced, I can give the machine a test, and see if it's worth buying an expensive rip fence for.

If you made it this far: thanks for reading, and happy new year
IMG_20211228_180612.jpg
 

Orraloon

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Cant say I have heard of them either. For the blocks use a bit of wood dowel and a hammer and tap them out. With the screws undone of course. Put the block in the vice to do it. As to blocks if those come out whole then just clean and square the faces and keep using them. Another option is a dense hard wood. I used jarrah blocks on a previous saw I had but any really hard wood will do.
For a fence a bit of wood and 2 clamps. Looking at that table it would be difficult to mount a front rail for a modern fence to run on.
Blade length is measured off that blade.
Anyhow hope things work out with it and have a happy new year.
Regards
John
 

disco_monkey79

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Hi

Thanks for your message. I managed to drift one guide out, but I destroyed the other in removing it. The alloy had furred up, holding it tight (ironically, the jammed thumb screws weren't even touching the blocks. But they needed freeing up anyway)..

Anywho, I have ordered some dowel which will hopefully arrive tomorrow so I can continue playing...
 

JobandKnock

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Looks like it may be a butcher's meat saw to me (thin table, no provision for fence from the look of it)
 

disco_monkey79

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Hi, quick further update.

As per JobandKnick's observation, I had also come to the conclusion that it was probably a butcher saw (design of the guide, and 78" blade length).

There was a fence on it once - a sturdy steel rod comes out of the frame at 90 degrees to the blade, but some helpful soul has sawn it off flush at some point. It had probably seized like everything else, so they hacked it off.

Anywho, the blade on it was horribly blunt (the sawdaust was blackened and stinky), and the drift was awful. But a new rip blade has just arrived, so I bunged it on, and it hooned through 35mm oak without hesitation.

The plan is to use this for rough ripping, and keep my Startrite 351 for finer work.

Thanks all
 

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