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Foam Brushes And Gloss Paint

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Woodythepecker

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If there is any diy job i hate its decorating. But as SWMBO has spoken i have no choice but to get the tools out and get on with it.

I have to gloss the internal doors, but in the past i have found that i cannot get all the brush strokes out (to my satisfaction anyway), and i was wondering if i could use a foam brush, and if so would it give a better finish then the normal hair type brush?
The reasoning behind this is that one brush has hundreds of hairs to leave lines, where as the other one can only leave two lines, one on either side of the foam edge.

On the other hand the problem could be down to my technic.

Any advice would be welcome.

Regards

Woody
 

wizer

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try thinning down the gloss
 

Woodythepecker

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Wizer, thanks. What ratio of white sprit and paint would you use, and would you thin down the primer/undercoat too?

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Woody
 

Argee

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Woodythepecker":36wru0yu said:
I have to gloss the internal doors, but in the past i have found that i cannot get all the brush strokes out (to my satisfaction anyway), and i was wondering if i could use a foam brush, and if so would it give a better finish then the normal hair type brush?
The reasoning behind this is that one brush has hundreds of hairs to leave lines, where as the other one can only leave two lines, one on either side of the foam edge. Regards Woody
That's what I thought, until I tried it! Foam brushes have two disadvantages, in my view. The first is that they're very flimsy in comparison to a "real" brush and will flex so much that the small internal (usually plastic) strengthener rubs, wearing the foam and sometimes leaving granules of foam behind.

The second disadvantage is that they can leave air bubbles in the finish. As you may guess, I've reverted to a good-quality bristle brush. The thinning advice may also be applicable to foam brushes, but I can't say that I've bothered to try it.

What you might also consider is to slap the gloss on with a foam roller - they're quite effective and leave a sort of eggshell finish. If you want a gloss finish, smooth it out with a brush.

Ray.
 

Woodythepecker

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Ray, thanks a lot, i appreciate your help. Is it easy to get a good finish with a roller as opposed to a brush?

Can anyone give me any tips on getting a good gloss finish? How much white sprit should i mix with the paint? How many top coats should i put on?
Now guys i really do need help here. We are talking about the happiness of SWMBO and how much damage my ear drums will take if i don't get it right.

Regards

Woody
 

seaco

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I have just painted my 14 doors they are six panel doors and I've found the best way is to use small gloss rollers and a good 2" brush put the paint on first with the roller then finish in the moulding with the brush it has left a lovely finish!

The gloss I've used is a one coat Coverplus from Woolworths £7.49 for half a gallon and it's left a really good gloss finish...
 

Argee

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Woodythepecker":3vt3bkh2 said:
Ray, thanks a lot, i appreciate your help. Is it easy to get a good finish with a roller as opposed to a brush? Regards Woody
Woody,

Look for the small (about 100mm) foam rollers that the large sheds (Payless, Homebase, etc.) sell. They fit those long behind-the-radiator rollers, but you can also get a short-handled version with a little tray - comes in an all-in-one kit for about four quid.

The trick is to try to keep a wet edge, so you've got to be fairly swift when you put it on with the roller. Don't press too hard near the edges, or you'll get runs. A light touch is what I've found to be the most successful, once you've got a cover of paint laid down.

My method for panelled doors is to do the top and middle rails, then whizz down the stiles, just past the middle rail. Next, the bottom rail, then carry on down the stiles, finishing off with the brush.

Next, I do the moulded edges of each panel, overpainting onto the panel by about 25mm. The roller does the fields of the panels next, then smooth out with a good brush. Hope that makes sense?

Try an inside cupboard door first! :)

Ray.
 
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Woody

I have to agree with Ray. Foam brushes will disapoint when used with gloss paint for the reasons he gave. If you buy a very good quality paint brush or a small roller, then you will be pleased with the results.
 

Woodythepecker

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Ray, Tony, thanks to you both. I will give the roller/brush combination a go.

Regards

Woody
 

frank

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woody first off you must prepare the surface rub down then under coat, lightly rub down, then use the foam roller and lightly draw the paint brush over the surface of the paint this will remove the orange peel look and flatten the paint to let it dry to a high gloss . as the man said practice my son practice :wink:
 
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Anonymous

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what i use and you get excellent results is a gloss roller you have to use a brush on the beading but the flat bits use a roller you won't be dissapopinted.

cheers,
Derek.
 

Woodythepecker

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Once again thanks to you all. I will nip out today and buy them both.

Regards

Woody
 

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