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Flush cutting dowels/plugs

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Anonymous

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I expect this only happens to me but I found when flush cutting dowels or plugs with a fine toothed saw I was scratching the surface of the wood. To overcome this problem I bought some very thin brass sheet from a modelling surplier, drilled the most frequently used hole sizes in it, 6mm, 8mm & 10mm in my case and simply place it over the dowel/plug and then flush cut without damage to the wood surface, ready for sanding. The brass sheet has not blunted the saw either, I'm happy to say.

Having said all that I expect you guys flush cut without any need for brass sheets and the like :)
 

Dewy

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Yes. You can get a saw specially for cutting dowels. It only cuts on one side. Or you could use a Japanese pull saw. They have no set to the teeth.
 

Waka

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Lee Valley do the flush cut saw for plugs & dowels.

Waka.
 

Alf

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Chaz,

Well I rather like your solution. :D I've never had much joy with flush cutting saws, so I tend to cut well shy of the surface and pare down with a chisel. It's one of those processes I really enjoy, dunno why. Maybe I should get one of those Miller Dowel things and make nothing that doesn't require paring dowels flat to the surface - woodworking nivarna. :lol:

Cheers, Alf
 

Chris Knight

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Chaz,
Like Alf, I haven't got a very good record with flush cutting saws - I guess I am a bit careless or something, they never seem to cut very well and when I put any pressure on I bend the blade enough to mark the work anyway.

I use an index card in the same way you use brass and then just pare the slight excess that leaves.
 
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Anonymous

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I'm with Chris and Alf. I cut down to about 1-2mm above the surface with a japanese saw and then pare the rest away with a chisel - which I really enjoy too :)

Cheers

Tony
 
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Anonymous

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Hmmm, interesting.

I've just received a flush cut saw from Axminster, I'm making the Adirondack chair that bilzee posted. This has 68 (at last count) plugs to cut flush, so by the 67th I should have the hang of it :D

Testing the saw - or rather testing me using it - I have noticed it's important to keep the blade very flat and level to the work surface, I've seen his Normness using a finger on the blade (applying pressure downwards) to achieve this - does seem to help.

Now off to practise plug cutting :D
 
A

Anonymous

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I was interested to see that Miller Dowel 'review' at the back of Axminster's Review magazine (having already said I don't read reviews, forgot about this one :D ) and for 'close to the edge' work I suppose they are very good but I prefer to know that under a plug there's a screw holding everything together and that's why I'll still use my favourite drill bits to date, 'Multi-Mate' here's the Screwfix link: http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro ... 1&ts=22237 I love these bits (that sounds sad I know) but they do it all and all I've got to do is screw, drop of glue and plug and, finally, flush cut :wink:
 

Bean

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I'm with Alf and Tony here, theres somthing nice about paring a dowel with a chisel :D , I have a Japanese Saw which will cut flush but its not the same :(

Bean
 
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