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floor standing pillar drill

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Digizz

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I'm still on the lookout for a reasonable pillar drill (200-300 quid max). I'm not sure whether to go for one of the type that pulls out so you can get bigger work under it, or the fixed type?

I want it for general woodworking/cabinet making but also need one for light metal working / general / plastic drilling / PCB drilling etc.

Any thoughts?

Ta.
 

Bean

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I'm not sure about the advantages of the pull out ones, they look like they will become unstable quickly, if not bolted to the floor. Look out for an older model with a Drilling Head which clamps on to the column as this gives you the option of turning the head to drill tall items ie doors stood on the edge.
Some of the cheaper newer models do not have very good bearings in the quill and produce a fair bit of runout by the time you get to the tip of the drill.
Whatever you buy it would be worth swapping the chuck supplied with it for a quality keyless one from an engineering suppliers :) worth every penny !

Try a meddings they seem to be resonable quality and were british made.

Hope this helps

Bean
 

Adam

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I ended up buying a Scheppach Radial Arm Pillar drill - for exactly the reasons you state - I want it to "pull" forwards to maximise the range of jobs it can undertake. Axminster have a very similar version in their "Perform" range, which I also considered. Unfortunately, I don't have space for a floor standing version, which I would have preferred, instead, I've opted for a bench mounting one.

I think buying drills really "cheap" pillar drills is false economy - it's the one tool where the quality of it really shows up, when inserting dowels to "smooth" holes etc - a sign of good bearings, and a smooth action.

I'd looked at the Scheppach at my local store, and could find no particular positives or negatives for it over any other machine, other than it was a "radial" version, and seemed quite "beefy" - so decided to buy it. They will set it up, and deliver and install at the same time as they drop off my P/T, which means I don't put any strain on my back, which wasn't possible with the Axminster as I'd have had to carry it.

Adam
 

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