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Primer

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I got this from B&Q:

7833F927-912F-4272-9235-9DE87702DB15.jpeg


And turned it into this:

424F18CF-D0F0-46B1-9BE7-6EA5B452CFFE.jpeg


All I did was sand it down, which was hugely satisfying, and the routed the edges with a round over bit.

This is the first but of woodworking I’ve done since high school some 25 years ago.

.... it’s a chopping board lol
 

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Nelsun

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Chopping boards never look quite the same after a few days... never mind weeks, months and beyond. Welcome to your tool aquesition habbit ;)
 

Primer

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Haha yeah tell me about it. Spent more on tools in the past 3 weeks than I have in the past 40 years.
 

Trainee neophyte

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Primer":wbzmy27g said:
Haha yeah tell me about it. Spent more on tools in the past 3 weeks than I have in the past 40 years.
Well, it's a good start, and now you can get serious. You also need to explain to the kids that their inheritance has been redirected, and that the Christmas presents will be more practical from now on. Who doesn't like salad forks?
And just remember: "Safety is our number one priority!"


A very happy new year to all.
 

AJB Temple

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My advice to anyone new to woodworking, is to get some basic hand tools. I know your wife bought you a bench, which hopefully is sturdy (if not, make it as rigid as possible).

You probably already have these but you need a tenon saw, set square, a few chisels, marking gauge, steel rule, tape measure, pencil and knife, mallet, a plane (very difficult to do high quality work with an electric plane) ....and get cracking learning to dimension, smooth and square wood; make simple joints and make simple things like boxes.

Accurate marking and cutting dead square is key right from the outset.

PS: I am not anti power tools: I use them constantly, but they just assist what we do and we need the basic skills. Sometimes power tools, if we use the wrong ones or in in the wrong way, are a short cut to wrecking wood.
 

Primer

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That’s a great list! I have all of that except hand planes and chisels. I’m away to amazon.co.uk right now!

I’ve heard a number 5 plane is “the only plane you’ll need”. Would you agree that’s where I should start?
 

Mcdemon

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2nd hand on Ebay for tools particularly planes. Look at Paul Sellars vids on you tube and his websites for tool buying guides.
Older tools are much better than the poor offerings today unless you are willing to buy veritas, lie nielsen etc.
I was trained many years ago using hand tools and although I have power tools I now only use hand tools as my former profession is now a hobby.
Much more enjoyable, easier and probably just as quick for one off builds.
 

woodbloke66

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Primer":2u8nbdfq said:
That’s a great list! I have all of that except hand planes and chisels. I’m away to amazon.co.uk right now!

I’ve heard a number 5 plane is “the only plane you’ll need”. Would you agree that’s where I should start?
Don't go to Amazon...fine if you want to buy tat tools (generally) but not recommended. Have a look at Workshop Heaven, Peter Sefton's shop (Woodworker's Workshop) as well as Axminster though there are plenty of others - Rob
 

thetyreman

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the no5 and no4 feels puny to me, I don't like them as much as 4 1/2 and 5 1/2 which are wider and slightly heavier. Definitely go with a vintage one, toolique do a good job if you want one that requires no work, the prices are reasonable.
 

profchris

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thetyreman":3f0k97lq said:
the no5 and no4 feels puny to me, I don't like them as much as 4 1/2 and 5 1/2 which are wider and slightly heavier. Definitely go with a vintage one, toolique do a good job if you want one that requires no work, the prices are reasonable.
But do think about what you plan to make next - you'll end up with several planes over time, so your first should suit what your immediate plans are. I, for example, have no need for a 4 1/2, 5 1/2 or even a 5 because I mainly make ukuleles. OTOH my Quangsheng no 1 gets quite a lot of use. If I were planning a tabletop I'd definitely buy a 5 1/2.

Another thing to consider is your physical strength. Smaller planes need more planing strokes to do a set amount of work, but if you're a wimp like me you might prefer the lighter plane.

For smallish pieces I'd start with a no 4, which will always be useful. Or a 4 1/2 if you have muscles.

Don't buy a no 3 unless you make ukuleles or jewellery boxes. And no one seems to have a good word for the no 6, so (in the years to come) go to boot sales and find a no 7 or 8 to restore. But only if you're planing long things dead flat, of course.
 

thetyreman

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profchris":13600hae said:
thetyreman":13600hae said:
the no5 and no4 feels puny to me, I don't like them as much as 4 1/2 and 5 1/2 which are wider and slightly heavier. Definitely go with a vintage one, toolique do a good job if you want one that requires no work, the prices are reasonable.
But do think about what you plan to make next - you'll end up with several planes over time, so your first should suit what your immediate plans are. I, for example, have no need for a 4 1/2, 5 1/2 or even a 5 because I mainly make ukuleles. OTOH my Quangsheng no 1 gets quite a lot of use. If I were planning a tabletop I'd definitely buy a 5 1/2.

Another thing to consider is your physical strength. Smaller planes need more planing strokes to do a set amount of work, but if you're a wimp like me you might prefer the lighter plane.

For smallish pieces I'd start with a no 4, which will always be useful. Or a 4 1/2 if you have muscles.

Don't buy a no 3 unless you make ukuleles or jewellery boxes. And no one seems to have a good word for the no 6, so (in the years to come) go to boot sales and find a no 7 or 8 to restore. But only if you're planing long things dead flat, of course.
well yes I agree, entirely dependent on what you make, can't argue with that.
 

Primer

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Great advice thanks! I’m 6’5” and twenty stone so not worried about the weight of the plane :)



profchris":3dfxir3y said:
thetyreman":3dfxir3y said:
the no5 and no4 feels puny to me, I don't like them as much as 4 1/2 and 5 1/2 which are wider and slightly heavier. Definitely go with a vintage one, toolique do a good job if you want one that requires no work, the prices are reasonable.
But do think about what you plan to make next - you'll end up with several planes over time, so your first should suit what your immediate plans are. I, for example, have no need for a 4 1/2, 5 1/2 or even a 5 because I mainly make ukuleles. OTOH my Quangsheng no 1 gets quite a lot of use. If I were planning a tabletop I'd definitely buy a 5 1/2.

Another thing to consider is your physical strength. Smaller planes need more planing strokes to do a set amount of work, but if you're a wimp like me you might prefer the lighter plane.

For smallish pieces I'd start with a no 4, which will always be useful. Or a 4 1/2 if you have muscles.

Don't buy a no 3 unless you make ukuleles or jewellery boxes. And no one seems to have a good word for the no 6, so (in the years to come) go to boot sales and find a no 7 or 8 to restore. But only if you're planing long things dead flat, of course.
 

AJB Temple

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Well that is useful information. I am a big fella too and what you will very quickly find out as a big bloke is your bench needs to be heavy and substantial. Otherwise, pretty much whatever you do, you will find yourself pushing the bench around when you least want it - especially when planing.
 

Andy Kev.

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Primer":1kvapwtb said:
That’s a great list! I have all of that except hand planes and chisels. I’m away to amazon.co.uk right now!

I’ve heard a number 5 plane is “the only plane you’ll need”. Would you agree that’s where I should start?
In my opinion it depends on your build. If you’re 6 foot and broad shouldered, then a No 6 might be your ideal dogsbody plane, otherwise a 5 1/2 is a good idea. The Veritas low angle jack plane is also a fantastic bit of kit. Add to that a block plane and a 7 or 8 and you‘ll be ready to go.

It would be a very good idea to try them first if you can.
 

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