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ScaredyCat

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I'm in need of some emergency assistance. I've made a penguin but something odd has happened with the finish. I sanded to 320, used Hampshire microcrystaline wax followed by Hampshire sheen and it looked great. I put it aside while I did the nose. It took me a while, I have to try a couple of noses as I've not done much 'fine' work. Before doing any of the wax stuff I wipe down with isopropyl alcohol to clear any debris and give me an idea of the final look and/or where I need to work more.

If you look at the pictures below you can see pitting and some white stuff. It wasn't there when I put it aside and I have no idea what to do to remove it. Any clues?

This is a gift and I don't really have time to remake it. Where has this come from? Is it from the Hampshire stuff?



 

CHJ

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I would say that your problems stem from not sealing the wood with a sanding sealer before applying wax or using a wax/grit based product.
This has resulted in surplus wax/grit being forced into the wood pores, this is showing up as white residue as the solvents disperse.


Try removing any wax coating with a solvent like cellulose thinners, then after de-nibing surface apply sanding sealed to seal the wood.

There is no point in applying abrasive/wax carrying finishes over the top of microcrystalline wax, it just needs buffing to a shine, but you must seal the wood and burnish the sealed surface if necessary before applying wax.
 

ScaredyCat

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Hmm. I did use cellulose sanding sealer. Perhaps not enough?

I'll get some thinners and start again .Thanks for the tip.


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Dalboy

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Also, something worth looking at is that because it is end grain any pulled grain will open the fibres it only takes a minute to cut the wrong way on the last cut and the grain is pulled and it may take quite a bit of sealer to fill if at all.
Make sure you take the final cuts the correct way and with freshly sharpened tools
 

CHJ

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Dalboy":3ksrpdrw said:
Also, something worth looking at is that because it is end grain any pulled grain will open the fibres it only takes a minute to cut the wrong way on the last cut and the grain is pulled and it may take quite a bit of sealer to fill if at all.
Make sure you take the final cuts the correct way and with freshly sharpened tools
+1 for Dayboy's comments, been mulling over methods of disguising the open pores to suggest that would not risk worsening the appearance of your 'finished' item.
Little tricks and fudges to fill open pores that can be got away with after some experience risk making things worse.
 

Paul Hannaby

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The problem appears to be torn end grain from either a blunt tool or incorrect technique. The concentric circles of damage are the indicator here. Ensure the tool is properly sharpened and cut from wider to narrower diameter to cut with the grain to get the best surface finish without tear.

If you achieve a good surface, the use of sanding sealer or not is academic, it just varies the level of shine.

There should be no reason to put one type of wax on top of another, just use the one you choose and leave it at that.
 

ScaredyCat

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Paul Hannaby":1whmw4f4 said:
The problem appears to be torn end grain from either a blunt tool or incorrect technique.
It's going to be me and poor technique. Tools are carbide tipped ones. I think I need a finer tip on one, perhaps some designed to pen work.

Paul Hannaby":1whmw4f4 said:
The concentric circles of damage are the indicator here. Ensure the tool is properly sharpened and cut from wider to narrower diameter to cut with the grain to get the best surface finish without tear.
Paul Hannaby":1whmw4f4 said:
There should be no reason to put one type of wax on top of another, just use the one you choose and leave it at that.
Ok, it was my understanding that the microcrystalline one was supposed to go on first to 'polish it up' and then the real finish went on top. Pretty sure that's how the Hampshire sheen bloke sells it. If there's no need I wont repeat. I've just got myself the Chestnut buffing system as an alternative process too.


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CHJ

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ScaredyCat":3km0ig3w said:
…...
It's going to be me and poor technique. Tools are carbide tipped ones.
.
As good as Carbide tipped tools are when used to their best advantage "horses for courses as it were". For cutting across end grain areas there is nothing like a sharp bevel rubbing gouge to shear cut (slice)the fibres without pulling them. In most instance a normally presented carbide tip is chopping not shearing albeit with a sharp edge. (approach angle can negate this)

Difficult areas of grain that have a propensity to 'pull' can be tamed by wetting the wood surface before final cuts to swell and increase the support of the fibres, try sanding sealer, finishing oil, or just water dependant on final finish intended.
 

KimG

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To make a repair you could use some sanding dust (always save your sanding dust when you can, keep it in polythene bank envelopes and have different types too) , put a little dust on the torn section and make it as flush as you can,then add a small drop of cyano acrylate (super glue) carefully wipe away any excess, repeat as required, then turn the item or sand it back to the surface proper and re-colour to match the existing work. Obviously this step is best done prior to any finishing, but with care you can rescue even complex items like your Penguin. I have used this technique on many occasions, today being the most recent!
 
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