Finish for end grain slices

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alex robinson

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I have some end grain slices (about 40cm across and 5cm thick) that I would like advice about finishing please. Completely dry and been flattening them with a router. They are a bit punky, so I am considering soaking them in epoxy to stabilise them.

What would people suggest finishing them with? I would prefer a more natural look than a flood coat of table top epoxy or polyurethane. In the past I have had problems with tung oil not taking when pores are filled like this. Is it worth trying again with oil, or will it have to be a film finish?

Thanks in advance!
 

Wood4me

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Try flood coating with really low viscosity CA glue , ( I have found it really cheap in Properjob ) but readily available on Ebay etc.
Probably best to apply outside as the fumes are not pleasant. It leaches deep into the wood really well and will cure quite rapidly depending on MC. Wipe 'pooling' around after a min or so. TAKE CARE to keep it off yourself!! When completely cured sand off the surface glazing and oil finish to achieve the natural look. I say "sand" but I never use the stuff since realizing the superior cutting of Abranet .
I also always use CA glue as a filler using very finely sieved wood dust, fill the void with dust and drip on the low vis CA ,
if it sinks; re apply until proud , then sand.
 

sawtooth-9

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Marine suppliers have a Norglass or Epidure product, which is a "water thin " epoxy.
It's perfect for sealing end grain.
I usually use two coats to seal timber and three coats for the end grain ( with a light sand between coats )
 

alex robinson

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Try flood coating with really low viscosity CA glue , ( I have found it really cheap in Properjob ) but readily available on Ebay etc.
Probably best to apply outside as the fumes are not pleasant. It leaches deep into the wood really well and will cure quite rapidly depending on MC. Wipe 'pooling' around after a min or so. TAKE CARE to keep it off yourself!! When completely cured sand off the surface glazing and oil finish to achieve the natural look. I say "sand" but I never use the stuff since realizing the superior cutting of Abranet .
I also always use CA glue as a filler using very finely sieved wood dust, fill the void with dust and drip on the low vis CA ,
if it sinks; re apply until proud , then sand.
Thant sounds as if you are completely filling the grain (as with the epoxy). What oil so you use over the top? As it is sealed, do you get problems if it is too smooth? I sanded up to 600 with the last one and the tung oil flaked straight off
 

Wood4me

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The oil I used was the type often supplied for turned bowls. 600 May be a little too fine for the “natural” look you are after. The other option to oil, is to just wax them with furniture wax, but won’t be as tolerant if they get wet. Renaissance wax works well.
Another option to CA glue is Rustins 2 pack plastic coating but thinned with their thinners. Then sand off as previous post . Try samples until you get the finish you are aiming for.
The large cheese board was the Rustins + oil.
826B717D-7038-45DA-9351-DD8EF654BBC5.jpeg


464C843E-ADAF-469B-9477-1C1260D25DF2.jpeg
 

alex robinson

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The oil I used was the type often supplied for turned bowls. 600 May be a little too fine for the “natural” look you are after. The other option to oil, is to just wax them with furniture wax, but won’t be as tolerant if they get wet. Renaissance wax works well.
Another option to CA glue is Rustins 2 pack plastic coating but thinned with their thinners. Then sand off as previous post . Try samples until you get the finish you are aiming for.
The large cheese board was the Rustins + oil.
View attachment 138066

View attachment 138067
Beautiful cheeseboard! Did you have any gaps to fill round those knots? In which case, that oil certainly works on completely filled surfaces. I will try again - perhaps it was bad luck with the tung oil.

The alternative is a thin layer of table top epoxy, and just to embrace the artificial surface coating look and make the most of the durability I suppose.
 
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