Finally built a fold-down MFT

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PerryGunn

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Hi There, Just joined up. Love your folding table. My workshop size is very similar to yours so I can relate to your issue regarding space.
Fortunately I have a single garage which I intend to kit out with a fold down MFT and yours seems ideal. Really impressed with your design, however I have a couple of questions which I hope you can answer. Could you possibly advise a little more detail of the hinge arrangement showing how any additional timber you added to the main 4 x 2 frame. Also I was a little concerned if the fold up leg needed any additional diagonal bracing. I noticed some marks on the top of the legs together with some possible indication of a fastener or bracket that may help to steady the legs when in the down position. Thankyou in advance.
For the hinges there is a 4x2 fixed through the plywood walls to the 4x2s that make up the workshop wall framing - I removed the plywood and added a couple of additional horizontal noggins between the verticals to ensure support across the whole width . The L & R sides of the framework are longer than the MDF top so there is a rebated cross member at the back of the MDF with a gap of ~25mm to the rear 2x4 (there is an additional infill block in the centre that makes the rear look like a very elongated 'H'. You can see the infill block at the bottom of the first photo below the mini systainer.

The marks at the top of the legs are small dimples from a couple of plastic capped facia nails that the legs sit against when they're in the correct position, the leg ends are cut at a slight angle so they're flat on the floor when the legs are folded out just past vertical - being past vertical, plus the weight of the table, means they won't slip backwards when the table is down (I nearly broke a toe giving them a few hefty kicks to test this)

The legs don't need diagonal bracing to stop side-to-side movement as there is a backboard of 9mm ply screwed to the rear of the legs and horizontals - it's obvious in the photos with the legs down - this keeps the legs rigid and also stops anything falling out the back. It doesn't go all the way to the top of the legs as I need to get my arm under the table if I want to screw a grip into a dog or clamp.
 
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Felipe

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I am mindblown! The leg/wall shelf reuse was just so neat! as everything else.
Very inspiring design there :)
 

Tezza1

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For the hinges there is a 4x2 fixed through the plywood walls to the 4x2s that make up the workshop wall framing - I removed the plywood and added a couple of additional horizontal noggins between the verticals to ensure support across the whole width . The L & R sides of the framework are longer than the MDF top so there is a rebated cross member at the back of the MDF with a gap of ~25mm to the rear 2x4 (there is an additional infill block in the centre that makes the rear look like a very elongated 'H'. You can see the infill block at the bottom of the first photo below the mini systainer.

The marks at the top of the legs are small dimples from a couple of plastic capped facia nails that the legs sit against when they're in the correct position, the leg ends are cut at a slight angle so they're flat on the floor when the legs are folded out just past vertical - being past vertical, plus the weight of the table, means they won't slip backwards when the table is down (I nearly broke a toe giving them a few hefty kicks to test this)

The legs don't need diagonal bracing to stop side-to-side movement as there is a backboard of 9mm ply screwed to the rear of the legs and horizontals - it's obvious in the photos with the legs down - this keeps the legs rigid and also stops anything falling out the back. It doesn't go all the way to the top of the legs as I need to get my arm under the table if I want to screw a grip into a dog or clamp.
Thankyou, Can't quite see exactly how the hinge side is made up, but I guess when I give it some time it will all become clear. Just need to sort out a supplier for the 22mm top. Thankyou once again.
 

PerryGunn

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Thankyou, Can't quite see exactly how the hinge side is made up, but I guess when I give it some time it will all become clear. Just need to sort out a supplier for the 22mm top. Thankyou once again.
If I have time tomorrow, I'll see if I can grab a couple of photos that will make it clearer
 

PerryGunn

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Thankyou, Can't quite see exactly how the hinge side is made up, but I guess when I give it some time it will all become clear. Just need to sort out a supplier for the 22mm top. Thankyou once again.

I tried taking photos but it was difficult to show the arrangement so I knocked up a quick diagram of the framework that holds the MDF top, I've ignored the 19mm trim as that would make it too messy.

The hinges are rebated into the framework and the 4x2 attached to the wall. The infill piece is just to add rigidity - it could have been full width but, by that point, I realised how heavy it was going to be and thought I'd save a little bit of weight.

The grey is the wall and the brown is where the MDF overlaps the 4x2.

MFT Layout.jpg
 

Tezza1

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That brilliant. thankyou so much - I get it now. In a former life I used to be a draughtsman so I am into drawings a lot. Yours is top notch.
I have a sheet of 2.25mm thick laminate which I was considering for the top of the MDF. However I only have sufficient for the top. Do you think that would be ok or would it cause the top to bow to stress if the underneath was left uncovered. Welcome your thoughts.
 

PerryGunn

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That brilliant. thankyou so much - I get it now. In a former life I used to be a draughtsman so I am into drawings a lot. Yours is top notch.
I have a sheet of 2.25mm thick laminate which I was considering for the top of the MDF. However I only have sufficient for the top. Do you think that would be ok or would it cause the top to bow to stress if the underneath was left uncovered. Welcome your thoughts.
MRMDF is water-resistant anyway and doesn't tend to swell/bend as much as the normal stuff - I'd think that, if you seal all sides of the MDF and fix it securely to the framework, you should be fine.

The 22mm that I used is about as thick as I'd want to go as anything thicker would make getting clamps through the holes very awkward - if you're going to laminate the top, you might want to think about using 18mm

That said, I'm not sure I'd want a laminated top on an MFT if it was too smooth/slippery - unless you're going to clamp for every cut, you need a certain amount of friction between the piece you're cutting and the work surface to help keep it in place.
 
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Tezza1

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MRMDF is water-resistant anyway and doesn't tend to swell/bend as much as the normal stuff - I'd think that, if you seal all sides of the MDF and fix it securely to the framework, you should be fine.

The 22mm that I used is about as thick as I'd want to go as anything thicker would make getting clamps through the holes very awkward - if you're going to laminate the top, you might want to think about using 18mm

That said, I'm not sure I'd want a laminated top on an MFT if it was too smooth/slippery - unless you're going to clamp for every cut, you need a certain amount of friction between the piece you're cutting and the work surface to help keep it in place.
đź‘Ťthanks for your reply
 
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