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Festool ts55 advice

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sometimewoodworker

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I’d ask where you intend using the tracksaw @kingkiki i have the 240v Festool ts55 in the workshop & it’s great when the power cable is suspended from the ceiling & not left to trail & snag on the track & anything else it can.
The power cable on my Festool tools are attached to the vacuum hose so there is no more snag risk than the vacuum hose creates.
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Doug71

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The only real difference between 240 and 110 is you can happily use 110 in the garden on a damp day and not risk being electrocuted.

Not sure if it's still the case but the 110v version didn't used to have a brake, also some people report the 110v stuff is underpowered compared to the 240v.

Edit to say yes looks like the new model now has a brake :rolleyes:
 

Distinterior

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A mate of mine had a 110v TS55 which I used on a couple of occasions but I've only ever had a 240v TS55 myself.
The 240v version definitely has more grunt..!

Regarding the Festool hose, ...I have mine attached via a boom arm along with the power cable above my cutting bench position.
The cable is held in place with Velcro as can be seen below.

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sometimewoodworker

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Why would using a 240V tool on a damp day risk electrocution?
It rather depends on the setup supplying the 110V equipment as to the electrocution risk.

Many/all commercial site supplies have centre tapped 110volt transformer so the voltage to ground is 55v so the chance of death while not zero is low.

So if you are using a centre tapped 110volt transformer (most likely as site transformers are common) your risk is low.

if you are using a different transformer (common for inexpensive 240v -> 110v step down ones) the chances are higher As you get the full 110v to ground.

If using a 240v supply your chances are higher still.

Add damp to the mix and that elevates the risks by a lot. You can increase it again by using one hand on the tool and the other on the item, this gives a hand to hand path transiting the heart a few milliamps (at 240v) usually over 30 can stop your heart or put it into fibrillation so providing a death opportunity
 

sometimewoodworker

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The cable is held in place with Velcro as can be seen below.
The Velcro is ok ish, I did try that but it catches too easily, so the sleeve I posted avoids most snagging.

My hose also usually attaches to a boom arm which I made from plumbing PVC pipe. It gives me a 3 meter arc extension from the wall
 
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sometimewoodworker

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That sounds familiar...! Mine swings out about 120 degrees.

View attachment 123221
A little similar, but, I’ve used the plumbing plastic to route the airflow so this gives an extra 3 metres reach and have a cyclone incorporated as well. This means that I can almost reach the other side of the workshop or a 180 degree radius of about 6.5 metres, though it doesn’t quite cover the complete workshop as I installed it only 4 meters from the front.
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Distinterior

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When I was planning & building my boom arm, I did consider using the PVC pipe as a means of extraction, but I do machine a lot of manmade boards and material and these do generate quite a lot of static when cutting/machining....The PVC pipe doesn't give me the Anti Static advantage that I get with the Festool 36mm hose running directly to the extractor from the tool.
Overall length of that hose is 7mtrs and it reaches far enough into my workshop for 99% of my projects.
 

Nelsun

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I don't have the height (or space!) for an arm but a number of bicycle hooks dotted around the place (into rafters) gets my 5M hose where I need it quickly, easily and up and out of the way. Definitely a poor man's boom arm though.
 

Bojam

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That's versus a 1 year on I think all of the competition apart from I think Triton who also offer a 3 year guarantee.

3 year warranty on all Bosch Pro tools as long as you register the purchase within the set time limit.

Blades - yeah the standard supplied Bosch blade was decent - certainly good enough for sheet goods. But the dedicated rip and crosscut blades from Freud work a treat with the dense tropical hardwoods I work with. Likewise, people recommend upgrading the standard Festool supplied blade with the TS55 to the Panther range when working with "real" wood.
 

TRITON

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Why would using a 240V tool on a damp day risk electrocution?
Er...water..doesnt like or mix well with mains electricity.
Mainly its the powercord, which would be in use if youre working outside and the electrical socket is inside. If the cord is sitting on a damp surface or across a puddle or such, you can be(to my knowledge) electrocuted, which is why site tools are 110v
 

Sporky McGuffin

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If the cord is sitting on a damp surface or across a puddle or such, you can be(to my knowledge) electrocuted, which is why site tools are 110v

The power cord is insulated. It could run through a swimming pool and cause no problem. Transformers are safer because the output floats - it is not referenced to ground, so there's no potential difference even if you're barefoot in a puddle.
 

TRITON

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The power cord is insulated. It could run through a swimming pool and cause no problem. Transformers are safer because the output floats - it is not referenced to ground, so there's no potential difference even if you're barefoot in a puddle.
Well i was advised not to do such, so as a result i dont. Cables can have cracks or tiny splits in them, into which moisture could seep causing a short, which is the reason HSE strongly recommends 110v only on site.
Given it's electrocution, which can result in death, it's not something I'll ever want to try

If its a practice you want to pursue, and feel happy about using 240v in damp or wet condition, I say go for it, it's you're own lookout.

I ask you. When was the last time you checked the length of any of your cables and looked closely for damage. I'll guess thats a never right ?
 

Sporky McGuffin

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I ask you. When was the last time you checked the length of any of your cables and looked closely for damage. I'll guess thats a never right ?

Nope - it was on Saturday, which was the last time I used a power tool in the workshop.

I'm not advocating running mains cables through puddles, but that's not the primary risk.
 

TRITON

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Nope - it was on Saturday, which was the last time I used a power tool in the workshop.

I'm not advocating running mains cables through puddles, but that's not the primary risk.
Right well enough said then. You do what you feel happy with and i'll do what Im happy with.
 

Steve_Scott

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Er...water..doesnt like or mix well with mains electricity.
Mainly its the powercord, which would be in use if youre working outside and the electrical socket is inside. If the cord is sitting on a damp surface or across a puddle or such, you can be(to my knowledge) electrocuted, which is why site tools are 110v
I feel there is a general misconception of the risk using any electrical item with damp or even wet conditions. For an electric shock to occur you need a fault to first develop and then come into contact with that fault. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not advocating for people to go out in the rain, but that’s mostly because it’s miserable and the work gets wet! An extreme example perhaps, but I’d certainly have no concern using my pressure washer in the rain.

Another factor to consider in the 110/240V debate is the likelihood of coming into contact with a fault… which is higher on a site where generally speaking tools are worked a whole lot harder than my 240V kit at home. Where there is more kit, and a higher likelihood of a fault being present, the risk is higher so the mitigation is to reduce the severity of the hazard by dropping the voltage to change electrocution (which is death) into electrical shock.
 

Sporky McGuffin

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Most of the sites we attend for work don't allow any mains tools at all - they're all battery at the stages when we attend. I think that's partly for safety (trip hazard as much as electrocution), and mostly because the sparkies never get their stuff done on schedule. ;)
 

BucksDad

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I won't use tools when it's raining but I'll happily trail a cable on damp ground - however any extension leads I do use are H07RN-F cable which is flexible rubber and heavy duty
 

porker

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I would add that if you are using mains outside I would make sure you have a protective RCD on your supply to the tool. You may have this as part of your electrical installation anyway, but if you have an older system it is worth having an extension or socket with a built in RCD. Vastly improves the chances of you NOT getting a shock.
 
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