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Faceplate use.

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Democritus

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Am I right in thinking that a faceplate should never be used to secure end grain spindles, I.e screwed into the end grain of the spindle blank and then mounted on the lathe?
The reason I ask is that I came across a YouTube video made by someone called Roger Webb who was demonstrating how to turn a hollow vase from a spindle blank by mounting it on the lathe in this way. Isn’t it dangerous to do this?
 

J-G

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Basically YES you should NEVER screw into end-grain ---- the screw-thread simply cuts through the wood fibers
 

Sandyn

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I'm guilty of doing that. I must have been really lucky, so far I have never had a problem, except when screw tip became exposed. I also use a screw chuck all the time with only one screw into the end grain. I have never had any problems. On my faceplate I will use the outer screw holes to reduce the load on them. On a big bit of wood I might use all six screw holes. I just make sure it's secured firmly and the screw/s aren't overhauled. Surely others do it?


Screw chuck.JPG
 

Paul Hannaby

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Screwing in to end grain won't give as much grip as in side grain but whether it's good enough depends on the wood and the type of screw. A denser wood could probably still be mounted with screws in the end grain but if any doubt, you can always add tailstock support - ideally with a ring centre rather than a conical centre.
 

Robbo3

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Lots of variables.
If you have a chuck probably best to mount between centres, shape & cut a mounting tenon.
The longer & heavier the piece the more screws needed & tailstock support until it gets in the way.

These small ducks are held in a recess by 3 screws. As they are turned off centre the forces can be greater but I've not had one come off yet.
Duck (off centre) & Sanding Disc.jpg
 

Blister

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Best avoided , However it has been done, as long as you don't over tighten the screws and use ALL the screw holes , Also you are more likely to rip off the work if you have a catch / dig in
 

Doug B

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I don’t think I’d want to try hollowing on a face plate but all the fruit I’ve turn has been done on a screw chuck which is into end grain with only one screw, I’ve never had a problem & I’ve turn a lot of apples & pears.
That said as with many things it depends on your experience level, personally a chuck would be my method of holding when hollowing.
 

Phil Pascoe

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It's the length that matters - a few inches, a piece of fruit a knob or something on a screw chuck is fine, but to try to turn something a foot or more long screwed onto a faceplate is asking for trouble. Incidentally, a proper screw chuck and four woodscrews through a faceplate are different things.
 
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