Faceplate for axminster m900

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alex robinson

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Hello,

I am looking to get a large (6") faceplate to take some of the risk out of turning large wet pieces on my elderly amxinster m900. It is a 1" x 8tpi thread which is not a problem to find, but most faceplates are too "short". Due to where the motor is placed on this most faceplates hold the work too close to the headstock, so it catches on the motor housing. Axminster does not sell anything bigger than 3", so I wondered if anyone had any suggestions for where to get one from?
Many thanks,

Alex
 

Tris

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Others will know more about this but I think it will be hard to get a longer 'stem' on a faceplate as a short stem reduces the load that an out of balance piece puts on the headstock bearings compared to being further out.
I had a similar problem fitting a Longworth chuck on a Jet lathe and fitted a 2" spacer on the faceplate.
I expect someone with a metal lathe could turn you a threaded adapter or exsert
 

alex robinson

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Thanks for that. Do you think the added stress to the due to the piece being further away from the headstock will be much of a problem? Would I be better off drilling out the holes in the small faceplate so I can use heavier screws? I don't know what the maximum safe ratio of faceplate to workpiece is. I have had some 18" x 4" pieces of green sweet chestnut on it without anything breaking, but it did not feel particularly wise
 

Phil Pascoe

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So long as you don't go mad you should be OK. I use Reisser screws for faceplates/faceplate rings as the threads are sharp and well formed - Spax and others are good - I wouldn't use cheap screws, especially if you're trying to keep them short - which on occasion you need to. I don't think there's much to be gained in normal usage from using larger gauge screws.
 

Richard_C

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I too use reisser, self cutting and always give nice tight fit. I keep a tin of them in my 'chuck box' and use the longest ones consistent with the job I am doing. Screws are not a big part o fmy woodworking expenses (I'm diy/hobby) so I use reisser for most things now, they are so good.

Assuming you have no serious metalworking kit, might this help: how about a 150x150 or similar piece of good quality ply maybe 12 or 18mm, drill to match faceplate holes, countersink from the tailstock side and fit to current faceplate with CSK head machine screws with washers and nylon insert nuts on the headstock side. Then turn your plywood to a 150 circle, drill and countersink various holes to suit the blanks you might use and in use screw through as you would a normal faceplate. You are not limited to 4 holes around the perimeter, you could have 6, 8, more even and in 2 concentric rows which might be good for irregular jobs. There are probabaly many other ways to achieve a wooden faceplate extension.

Not tried it but I might, can't see why it wouldn't work. I always bring the tailstock up and leave it up as long as I possibly can - certainly until its all round and balanced - so the risk of a total failure must be remote.

Wiser heads might have different views.
 

Sachakins

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or a spindle extender
 

alex robinson

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Alex, I can let you have a few 5mm x 60mm Reisser screws if you need them, no point in buying a box of 200 if you only need a dozen.
dave

That is really kind of you. It sounds as if they are the sort to get though, so I might treat myself to a late Christmas present. Decent screws always come in handy. I try and keep the mounting screws pretty long as I am only holding items to turn the outside, before holding with a chuck for the rest. It was when I sheared the heads of the mounting screws (5mm Turbo 2, so not budget) taking a piece off recently that made me think the number of mounting screws might be a bit unsafe.

I like the idea of the wood faceplate to try and get a greater area for supporting over, and more screws the better. Unfortunately it a little hobby lathe, so only manages a 12" bowl over the bed. It has a rotating headstock, so it is possible to make bigger outboard, but it means that the big pieces that most need support from the tailstock don't get it.

or a spindle extender

I had wondered about something like this, but was a bit worried about adding too much extra flex to the system. I am using an a bowl turning outrigger to support the tool rest, and it makes everything irritatingly springy, especially combined with the shaking from an off balance piece. Would having the extra piece supporting the faceplate make this worse?

Thanks for all the helpful responses to a new member (long time lurker)- the forum seems a really welcoming place!
 

Terry - Somerset

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I used to have a similar lathe - albeit with 14" over the bed.

As suggested with large out of balance blanks I would bring up the tailstock for safety. But the real problem was that minimum lathe speed was too fast for an unbalanced blank. It is a fairly light weight machine - vibration + violent shaking (resonant frequency problem I think) made me very nervous.
 

alex robinson

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I used to have a similar lathe - albeit with 14" over the bed.

As suggested with large out of balance blanks I would bring up the tailstock for safety. But the real problem was that minimum lathe speed was too fast for an unbalanced blank. It is a fairly light weight machine - vibration + violent shaking (resonant frequency problem I think) made me very nervous.

I know, being able to use the tailstock is great, but for bowls larger than the swing over the bed I guess you just have to stand well back and start on the lowest speed. I have found that I can get a speed below the bottom fixed gear by turning the speed handle as far as it goes past the lowest setting, and tying it in place with some cord. Has anyone tried upgrading the motor on one of these old lathes to something with true variable speed?

The resonance with small machines is definitely a problem, and I think the flex from the outrigger makes it worse. One of these days I will be able to justify getting something big and heavy with a bit more power. I guess working within limitations promotes careful tool use and plenty of sharpening
 

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