External Doors - Weatherbars?

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BrandonB

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Hi all,

I have a question about weather bars - Do you or don't you, fit them and why?

Being a qualified carpenter with just under 10 years experience, I often notice some external doors/front doors are missing weather bars, surely they're essential to prevent the water on the outside face of the door running down and tracking back into the underside of the door? I can't think why people don't fit them - my theory would be the people who make and fit the doors would include a weatherbar whereas a carpenter buying an off the shelf door may just miss the detail?

Are they important or is it just an old fashioned thing? - I personally always fit one.

*Photo only for reference - It isn't my door or work.
 

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deema

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I fit them always. I use Schlegal bars which also seal the door. However, I suspect that the need for an accurate rebate along the bottom of the door and a drip groove plus a groove in the cill isn’t easy on site when fitting a supplied door into an existing frame. A lot I’ve seen seem to just seal the door against wiper seal.

I don’t fit weather deflectors, as I run the bevel on the cill right up to the weather bar. I match the same chamfer on the bottom of the door to reduce the aesthetic gap.
 

baldkev

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I guess it depends on door setup and location etc. If its outward opening ( not common ) theres a step up which provides weathering, if its in a sheltered location ( porch ) no need.
Theres weather thresholds, drop down weather bars routed into the centre of the bottom rail and all sorts of options... Even the old metal bars on the threshold with the door rebated over it used to work ok.
Maybe they arent fashionable? I havent fitted one for years. Mostly its composite doors or upvc.... the oak front doors ive fitted over the last 10/ 12 years had the stormproof thresholds from the joinery shop
 

RobinBHM

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on an open in door, a door drip helps to get water away from beneath the door. But door drops are fitted in between the frame and there has to be a tolerance gap, so water still gets down the sides and a water bar is still vital.

on open out doors, the door drip restricts how much the door opens so it has to be cut back.

To be honest an aluminium door threshold like an exited seal, is better as they are wind and water tight plus they have drain vents to allow water to escape externally.
 

Doug71

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I always find it interesting how things get called different names in different places, round here they are weatherboards.

As said in theory the Exitex Macclex type thresholds don't need one but I generally put one on as it looks right and some people expect it.

The Exitex thresholds are very good, only problem is people often cut them short (between the front of frame instead of into rebate) or they go a bit mad with the silicone and fill the weep holes so the water can't get out.
 

BrandonB

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I would also ask, draft seals? Usually they're routed into the frame or stops as standard with any new door. It's very rare they're cut into the edge of doors nowadays. if you're refitting doors that don't have them fitted to the door lining or stops would you router some aquamac into the edge of the door? I'm probably overthinking it....I just want the best job.
 

Jones

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If you routed aquamac into the door it would probably fall out particularly on the corners. Stick on p strip is certainly the easiest way to upgrade an existing frame.
 

Jar944

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Interesting. I've seen drawings of them in old millwork books but never seen a door with one in person.
 

TRITON

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Last outdoor door i made was for my parents cellar, as the old one had rotted away at the bottom, probably because of just those reasons. I fitted one and now 15 years down the line its still in prefect condition.
Which reminds me, I've a couple of screw plugs to replace that have come out.
 

Ttrees

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Whatcha do if the rain is still coming in on doors which swing open internally?
Seems I might need replace the ones on the doors anyway, but a better idea might be putting a drain there first, as some water stands elsewhere round the corner.
Will have a better look at them when it gets warmer, as they need some attention anyway.
 

Jones

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I have seen weather seal factory fitted to a door but it was a continuous loop of a rubber seal so couldn't come out.
 

baldkev

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Whatcha do if the rain is still coming in on doors which swing open internally?
Seems I might need replace the ones on the doors anyway, but a better idea might be putting a drain there first, as some water stands elsewhere round the corner.
Will have a better look at them when it gets warmer, as they need some attention anyway.
If the fit of the door is still good, check the seals. They get compressed and often need replacing after 5 years plus. Our windows needed them after about 6 or 7 years. What cill or threshold detail do you have?
 

Ttrees

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Don't think there is any seals on the doors, and regarding the cill and threshold detail,
I had to look it up to give you a respectable answer, there is no overlap between them, and it is a good possibility that the wind is blowing it in through them, aswell as surface water when the rain is very bad.

Seems I need a belt and braces approach really, and address both issues.
Not sure how a strip would look, but now that I have some terminology I might just have a google to seek for some discreet examples, which might just look like they've always been there.

Thanks
Tom
 

LeeAkeroyd

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I always find it interesting how things get called different names in different places, round here they are weatherboards.

As said in theory the Exitex Macclex type thresholds don't need one but I generally put one on as it looks right and some people expect it.

The Exitex thresholds are very good, only problem is people often cut them short (between the front of frame instead of into rebate) or they go a bit mad with the silicone and fill the weep holes so the water can't get out.

Definitely, up North if you asked for weatherboard you'd end up with shiplap or any other cladding. 😀
 

Doug71

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I would also ask, draft seals? Usually they're routed into the frame or stops as standard with any new door. It's very rare they're cut into the edge of doors nowadays. if you're refitting doors that don't have them fitted to the door lining or stops would you router some aquamac into the edge of the door? I'm probably overthinking it....I just want the best job.

It's not something I would normally do but I did that on some windows and doors a couple of years ago.

It was a big barn conversion, maybe done in the 80's, no draught seals in any of the windows (inset style) or doors but there was a groove around the perimeter of them all for a brush type seal but there wasn't any in, maybe didn't work very well? I ended up regrooving them to take Aquamac 21 using it as a wiping seal, seemed to work okay. I did do the most used doors differently though, they had a lath on to form the rebate so I replaced it with one a bit narrower with the Aquamac 21 in the back used as a compression seal.
 

johnnyb

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I love the old Macclesfield steps and always save them and reuse them. they are cast iron or thick aluminium. the new ones are just flimsy rubbish( in comparison)
I like the plastic weatherbar(or a metal one)
I think a 9 degree angle on upward facing stuff is a bare minimum. also door and frame at the same angle tends to not allow drainage even at steeper angles. it's why stormproof was invented.
 

johnnyb

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here's mine.anyone know the history of Montague Jones?
 

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