Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Extending socket cable

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

disco_monkey79

Established Member
Joined
5 Oct 2009
Messages
606
Reaction score
21
Hi

I warned you there'd be repeated questions...

For various uninteresting reasons, I want/need to move a wall socket by about 2 feet, but there isn't sufficient slack in the existing cable to allow it. The concrete floors and cable being within the wall mean entirely re-routing will be a PITA.

I understand that regs require cable joints to be accessible. So, if I were to make the join in the existing wall box, and cover it with a plain blanking plate (instead of a socket), would this be acceptable as "accessible"?

If so, what product could I then use to connect the existing pair of flat cables to the new bits? I'd prefer something more than just choc blocks, which would be reliant solely on the screws to hold everything.

If all this is an awful idea, then I could just live with it, but now (i.e. prior to decorating) is the time to make changes...

Thanks
 

Vann

Established Member
Joined
15 Oct 2008
Messages
1,855
Reaction score
24
Location
Petone, New Zealand
Why not retain the existing socket and install/have installed a second socket? If you have to have a plate there, you may as well have a socket in it. And over here (NZ) you do have to have a blank plate or similar.

What's "part P"?

Cheers Vann.
 

novocaine

Established Member
Joined
21 Jul 2014
Messages
2,418
Reaction score
218
Location
Warrington
Part P is the section within building regulations related to electrical installation and safety rules.

it's an excuse for a 2 day course if you ask a sparky.
 

AJB Temple

Finely figured
Joined
13 Oct 2015
Messages
3,458
Reaction score
649
Location
Tunbridge Wells
Does Part P notification actually apply here though. If it is adding a socket to an existing ring or adding a spur? As long as it is not in a notifiable location such as a bathroom.

I have the current regs but they are in my office, otherwise I would check.
 

pcb1962

Established Member
Joined
28 Jan 2014
Messages
1,063
Reaction score
142
Location
Surrey
novocaine":195usc4r said:
be aware that you are falling within Part P. (just saying)
Adding a socket to an existing circuit is not covered by Part P unless it's in a 'special location'

What types of electrical work are notifiable?
The introduction of the latest version of Part P was introduced on 6 April 2013, the range of works requiring notification has been reduced.

Notifiable works
The installation of a new circuit
The replacement of a consumer unit
Any addition or alteration to an existing circuit in a special location

Non- notifiable works
All other work is considered non-notifiable, namely additions and alterations to existing installations outside special locations, maintenance, replacement and repair work.
 

novocaine

Established Member
Joined
21 Jul 2014
Messages
2,418
Reaction score
218
Location
Warrington
I stand corrected. I was positive that any extension to an existing circuit involving use of terminal connections fell under part P. No idea where that came from though and happy to be proven wrong.

Still wagos.
 

flying haggis

Established Member
Joined
7 Mar 2009
Messages
1,120
Reaction score
128
Location
norfolk
As vann says use the existing socket to connect to the new(unless the existing is already a spur) and +1 for wagos (222 series) if you remove the socket and fit a blanking plate)
 

sunnybob

wysiwyg
Joined
11 Oct 2014
Messages
8,399
Reaction score
160
Location
cyprus
2 ft?
Put a longer cable on the machine. Job done. :shock: 8)
 

disco_monkey79

Established Member
Joined
5 Oct 2009
Messages
606
Reaction score
21
Hi

Thanks all for the replies.

This is in a bedroom, so not bathroom etc etc.

The original socket will be behind a large (but not fixed) piece of furniture, so v unlikely to get used, which is why I was happy to do away with it. However, a spur from it sounds the simplest solution.

I like the left-field thinking of making the appliance leads longer! But it would be nice to be able to change what's plugged in as and when I want

There are 2 cables to the original socket, suggesting it's on the ring. Away mentioned, they disappear in to the wall so are difficult to trace. I will do a resistance test to confirm.

Thanks again
 

Rorschach

Living on borrowed time
Joined
6 Jan 2016
Messages
4,409
Reaction score
351
Location
Devon
If you used Wago's you don't need future access so you could plaster over it, but a blanking plate is still the best option as you never know when you might want to move the furniture and reinstate the socket.
 

sunnybob

wysiwyg
Joined
11 Oct 2014
Messages
8,399
Reaction score
160
Location
cyprus
In that case I dont see any problem in just extending the circuit and fitting a new socket.
provided you are confident to connect the correct wires to the correct terminals.
Or, if the furniture will allow it, just use a piece of cable as an extension lead with a socket on the other end and leave the original plug and socket where they are,
 

Marineboy

Established Member
Joined
11 Mar 2016
Messages
559
Reaction score
9
Location
Northumberland
disco_monkey79":23vdfv78 said:
Hi

Thanks all for the replies.

This is in a bedroom, so not bathroom etc etc.

The original socket will be behind a large (but not fixed) piece of furniture, so v unlikely to get used, which is why I was happy to do away with it. However, a spur from it sounds the simplest solution.

I like the left-field thinking of making the appliance leads longer! But it would be nice to be able to change what's plugged in as and when I want

There are 2 cables to the original socket, suggesting it's on the ring. Away mentioned, they disappear in to the wall so are difficult to trace. I will do a resistance test to confirm.

Thanks again
Two cables going to a socket does not necessarily indicate it’s on the ring. The second cable may be going to a spur.
 

novocaine

Established Member
Joined
21 Jul 2014
Messages
2,418
Reaction score
218
Location
Warrington
if it was going to a spur, there would be 3 sets of cables. 2 on the ring and 1 on the spur.

even on a radial circuit, unless it's the last socket it would have 3 sets of wires if it's a spur (a spur off the last socket isn't a spur, it's an extension of the radial circuit). A good clue would be the wire gauge, radial being a lot thicker. you can always check the consumer unit as well to see how the circuit is wired.
 

novocaine

Established Member
Joined
21 Jul 2014
Messages
2,418
Reaction score
218
Location
Warrington
Marineboy":23e86y6h said:
Exactly. Spurs off spurs off spurs are not unknown.
no they aren't, I agree, but when you hear hooves think horse not zebra. :D

doesn't make any difference to the problem though, you still need to extend both wires to the new socket location.
 

porker

Established Member
Joined
15 Oct 2009
Messages
667
Reaction score
50
Location
Butlers Cross, Buckinghamshire
novocaine":3vwqpgmi said:
A good clue would be the wire gauge, radial being a lot thicker. you can always check the consumer unit as well to see how the circuit is wired.
Radial cable should be thicker (usually 4mm) if the radial circuit is protected with a 32A breaker but could be 2.5mm cable (same as a normal ring) if fused at 20A. This helped me out recently when I found a circuit in my house which was radial and difficult to run a return back to the CU. My electrician neighbour recommended I just derated to 20A breaker.
 

Deejay

Established Member
Joined
15 Nov 2007
Messages
659
Reaction score
0
Location
Wiltshire
Morning all

when you hear hooves think horse

I'd be inclined to think cowboy :D

Two cables on a ring main. Turn off the breaker. Remove both line wires from the socket. Turn on the breaker. If you get 230v on both line wires it's most likely to be on a ring main.

If it's in a chain of spurs, on a broken ring or a chain on a radial circuit, you will lose one of the voltages.

Good luck.

cheers

Dave
 
Top