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ever made a design error?

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Phil Pascoe

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From today's I -
Unclogging blocked toilets on the U.S. Navy's two newest aircraft carriers costs $400,000 a time. Sewage pipes on the USS Gerald R Ford and the USS George H W Bush are too narrow to cope with the waste produced by their crews of more than 10,000. Repairs are likely to require costly, and potentially regular, acid flushes.
 

Cheshirechappie

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Phil Pascoe":3izw0exf said:
From today's I -
Unclogging blocked toilets on the U.S. Navy's two newest aircraft carriers costs $400,000 a time. Sewage pipes on the USS Gerald R Ford and the USS George H W Bush are too narrow to cope with the waste produced by their crews of more than 10,000. Repairs are likely to require costly, and potentially regular, acid flushes.
You'd have thought they'd have checked the size of the discharging orifices before sizing the pipes, wouldn't you?
 

Trainee neophyte

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Cheshirechappie":2u86tqzs said:
Phil Pascoe":2u86tqzs said:
From today's I -
Unclogging blocked toilets on the U.S. Navy's two newest aircraft carriers costs $400,000 a time. Sewage pipes on the USS Gerald R Ford and the USS George H W Bush are too narrow to cope with the waste produced by their crews of more than 10,000. Repairs are likely to require costly, and potentially regular, acid flushes.
You'd have thought they'd have checked the size of the discharging orifices before sizing the pipes, wouldn't you?
I believe in the navy it is a requirement.
 

Aquachiefofficer

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When I was on the Kursk recovery project in 2001 I was told by the brilliant engineer who designed the lifting equipment, Malcolm Daley, that the submarine was lost due to a design flaw. In order to launch a torpedo the blast doors which separated the torpedo room from the rest of the sub had to be open to equalise the pressure. When they tried to launch a dummy torpedo on naval exercises the cheap WW2 detonator went off causing a small explosion and fire in the torpedo room which probably burnt all the oxygen as far back as the reactor room bulkhead and killing everybody in the forward part of the sub. The heat detonated a live torpedo and sent it to the bottom. A very unfortunate group of 11 men aft of the reactor bulkhead were left to endure a miserable death in the stern.
It cost the Russians billions for the sake of a 20p detonator.
 
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