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Engineering Tools Maybe ?

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AdrianUK

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Can anyone identify these items, both boxes were stored together, so and assuming they are related to engineering, lathe, guides tools.

Are they useful today, do they have any value or should I just recycle them at my local refuse centre.

056CF1CF-2BF7-49F5-9E2D-7BAC8DEA8BCD.jpeg
3A855ACC-64E7-49CD-A392-81E3EB5B8937.jpeg
50DF919C-6420-4EF2-99AF-3B473AB5938C.jpeg
3D2D2674-4B16-4DBA-9694-5D7DEA2B78B6.jpeg
5916DEC7-9BCF-4F42-AA4F-92B72BF4D679.jpeg
 

porker

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They look like engineering parallels. Think of them as very accurately machined spacers. They are used on milling machines and lathes for various applications where a piece needs to be packed accurately and flat for maching. Not sure what the thing with the points is but probably something along the same lines.
 

AdrianUK

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Thanks Porker, I was on the right lines, sort of ….. Are they still useful to machinists?
These are some of the items I’ve sorted from my g/f’s and fathers tool chests, that I don’t recognise, lots of unusual things.
 

novocaine

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as said, parallels and good ones at that, like testicles they are more use in pairs. no you shouldn't recycle them at your local. they are typically tool steel.
the bottom one looks like a transfer tool of some description.
 

Inspector

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I believe the pieces marked with Cyclone 70 are High Speed Steel tool blanks for the lathe. The rest are parallels with the possibile exception of the ones with the countersunk holes. They might be for vice jaws of some kind. The other tool is interesting and I don't recall any similar machining/inspection tools but my knowledge is not all encompassing.

Pete
 

clogs

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surely if u dont want them some home engineer would love to have them.....
If u were close to me we'd treat u to homemade Sunday lunch with tea and cake in the afternoon...

Over the years I collected lots of hand tools of all kinds......
there was a nice young family struggling at diy home repairs near wher ewe lived in France, gave the whole lot to him with a huge amount of new screws n nails....
chucked in a couple of old but working batt drills.....I know it made his day.....
I just could not take everything with me.....better to give it to someone who can make use of it all....
 

AdrianUK

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I believe the pieces marked with Cyclone 70 are High Speed Steel tool blanks for the lathe. The rest are parallels with the possibile exception of the ones with the countersunk holes. They might be for vice jaws of some kind. The other tool is interesting and I don't recall any similar machining/inspection tools but my knowledge is not all encompassing.

Pete
Thanks Pete, I think your spot on, I’ve just seen a few tool steel blanks on bay marked exactly the same :)
 

AdrianUK

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as said, parallels and good ones at that, like testicles they are more use in pairs. no you shouldn't recycle them at your local. they are typically tool steel.
the bottom one looks like a transfer tool of some description.
Thx Novocaine, useful, they are all either pairs or fours.
Not sure how easy they’d be to shift, near 9kgs in weight.
You may be on to something with a transfer tool, removing the screws underneath allows the steel bar to slide, and the pins on the removable bar are designed to match the top of the steel bar.
 

AES

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I agree with the comments about tool steel blanks (useful to a hobby metal machinist, MAYBE a small jobbing shop too). The parallels are DEFINITELY worth it to anyone doing any machining - turning, milling, even some types of centre-less grinding - CNC or "manual".

I could well be wrong, but is the last black bar item perhaps a trammel (for marking out)? In which case I don't what what the black rectangle accompanying the bar is. Don't see it as a transfer tool myself but could well be wrong on that.
 

MARK.B.

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Could those pins on the bar locate someway in a couple of those bits with countersunk holes in them ? then a light tap with a hammer to mark out evenly spaced drilling points :unsure::)
 

mcgranag

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The two bars are part of a strain gauge extensometer setup. I can’t remember the manufacturer of this system but I have used these to measure strains in concrete beams or slabs when loaded/tested. You will see bith male and female standards. The female standard is used to “zero” a dial gauge on a gauge tool having two metal points like the male bar. Any deflection in the sample causes the dial gauge to move and the reading corresponds to a certain micro strain. The male bar is used to precisely locate the divots which can often be bonded on to the sample. Once bonded and at the known spacing, the sample can be loaded. These gauges came in two lengths, one around 2-3 inches in length, the other about 8-9 in length as you seem to have. If I remember the manufacturer I can google and probably send on a pic.
 

dizjasta

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The Demec Gauge is used to provide measurement of masonry and concrete defects in the form of cracking.
It can also be used as a student teaching aid to explain strain variations in loaded reinforced concrete. It is usual to position Demec points on the side of a beam. The gauge reflects contraction close to the top surface and extension close to the bottom. Additional demec points can be attached at the beam's neutral axis and gauge reading do not vary throughout elastic range loading. You have a valuable item and to make it function Demec points as shown in the image are required. These stainless steel discs can be attached using material similar to Plastic Padding. The discs are positioned using the black gauge bar.
SAM_1592.JPG
SAM_1592.JPG
 

AdrianUK

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The Demec Gauge is used to provide measurement of masonry and concrete defects in the form of cracking.
It can also be used as a student teaching aid to explain strain variations in loaded reinforced concrete. It is usual to position Demec points on the side of a beam. The gauge reflects contraction close to the top surface and extension close to the bottom. Additional demec points can be attached at the beam's neutral axis and gauge reading do not vary throughout elastic range loading. You have a valuable
Thankyou Dizjasta, so, without the gauge, these are still useful, desirable?
I’ve just read the following, from dr google thanks to yourself and Macgranag’s info:

‘DEMEC strain gauges are supplied in a wooden case and come complete with an invar reference bar, for control measurements, and a setting out bar to enable accurate positioning of locating discs’

Am I correct to assume am what I have are the setting out bar?
 

dizjasta

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Hi AdrianUK. The parts you have are the silver coloured reference bar which is use to check the Demec gauge for faults or calibration problems. The other black bar is used for positioning the Demec points at the correct gauge distance for subsequent gauge measurements. It is unfortunate you do not have the measuring gauge to hand. Is there a chance it has been put somewhere safe?
 

AdrianUK

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Hi Dizjasta,
Unfortunately not, was amongst items in one of my fathers tool chests, and unlikely that the gauge has been missed. One of those thing, but at least I know what it is for, mystery solved, thanks.
May leave it on a shelf and let people try and work it out, although it’s specialist knowledge I think, is this your line ?
 

dizjasta

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Hi AdrianUK. My interest with Demec gauge equipment involves setting up gauge point arrays and ensuring accurate and reliable results can be obtained for reinforced concrete structures requiring assessment.
 
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