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Tanglefoot20

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Hello all

I have in my possession a few elm logs of various sizes and I’m wondering if turning as spindles along centre would be ok.... I have read about splitting at the pith but if turned offset from this it is sometimes acceptable.
I would like to try and turn some candle holders and quake type items... has anyone got ideas on this as I am new to turning wood... but grateful for ideas

Steve
 

marcros

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how big are the logs? you can certainly spindle turn elm, but I would advise splitting each long in half, and producing blanks from that if the size allows.
 

Tanglefoot20

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Thanks for reply... one is about 6” Dias by 18” long. Another about 9” by 12 long and 8” by 9 long.
I have a source for some more around this size but didn’t take too many just n case

Steve
 

Tanglefoot20

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I haven’t decided yet but I was thinking of around 4 to 5 inch max diam.... but would also like to make some larger diameter short squat type for larger candles
 

marcros

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I think that you may struggle with splitting/cracking, but it wouldn't take much effort to turn one piece down and see how it goes over the coming weeks inside. Elm is one of my favourite native woods, but I have only used board or blanks cut avoiding the pith. If you can get hold of some more, do so, because it will come in for something, even if only pen blanks.

On the larger logs, I would split them into quarters and work within the size of blanks that that produces. I make pepper mills using 3" square blanks and that it quite a chunk of timber.
 

MusicMan

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The best (and classical) way for spindle turning is to quarter each log along its length and use the four quarters as separate candlesticks. Quartering gives almost as much width as halving but gives twice the number of pieces.

You can turn a log as a whole if you want a more squat or thicker piece. Nothing wrong with it, you just have to be careful the pith is sound, or if not sound, is not prominent (nor used as the primary mode of attachment).

Watch out for splits, but it is presumably fairly old so is likely to have done its splitting by now. But inspect them carefully, as a split can translate into a flying splinter! Face mask recommended.

It's nice wood, I'd grab some more!
 

Tanglefoot20

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Thanks for that info... the tree itself was cut two weeks ago..I should of got it quartered with the chainsaw... duhhh.
Will try and get that done .. will also get hold of more for bowls n future projects
 

Tanglefoot20

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marcros":1r72f78s said:
I think that you may struggle with splitting/cracking, but it wouldn't take much effort to turn one piece down and see how it goes over the coming weeks inside. Elm is one of my favourite native woods, but I have only used board or blanks cut avoiding the pith. If you can get hold of some more, do so, because it will come in for something, even if only pen blanks.

On the larger logs, I would split them into quarters and work within the size of blanks that that produces. I make pepper mills using 3" square blanks and that it quite a chunk of timber.
Thanks for info...I should of got it split I suppose... but will try to turn some offset to pith...
 

MusicMan

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oh it's new? best quarter it before seasoning, and wax the ends. The best musical instrument makers, rough turn it to a cylinder when green, drill out the middle if it will end up hollow, then store it horizontally, rotating by 90 degrees every few months.

And if it is decent quality, you should be able to cleave it in quarters, with an axe and a heavy hammer.
 

Tanglefoot20

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Will see if I can get it quartered ... if not I will get some more sorted and prepped ... what wax do you use?

Steve
 

CHJ

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All the hedgerow Elm I've had in recent years I have planked to dry to avoid splitting, It suits my turning methods which are predominantly segmented or layered.

Does mean I waste less and maximise the pieces completed.

I'd be tempted to at least quarter your logs* to make up your candlestick stems.
If one of the logs is wide enough planking it into 40-50mm thick planks/slabs would be ideal for the bases.

*Quartering the logs would maximise the grain figuring on your candlesticks.
 

MusicMan

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Tanglefoot20":15ywricv said:
Will see if I can get it quartered ... if not I will get some more sorted and prepped ... what wax do you use?

Steve
A hardish wax, a paraffin wax such as candles is fine - melt it in a saucepan (don't overheat, it can catch fire!) and dip the ends in.

You can also store the pieces vertically, probably better if you can't turn them regularly.
 

Tanglefoot20

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Cheers music man.

It looks as though I may have to quarter Logs to best effect...I should of asked to have it done a the time...
I will certainly ask for more and get it quartered ...and some pieces with pith slabbed out for bowls

Steve
 

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