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Economy Router Lifter and Fine Height Adjuster.

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CHJ

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Objectives:
1. To make an Router Table height adjuster for heavy ½” router.
2. To make it from ‘scrap box’ material where possible without compromising on effectiveness.

Design criteria:
1. To give easy fine height adjustment over expected working range of cutters.
2. To provide means of rapid disengagement for rapid lowering of router if needed.

Observations:
1. The budget router being used suffers from a limited guide rod/bush system that jambs if attempts are made to produce a fine height adjustment from one side of machine (in inverted mode) .
2. The fitted springs exert far to much pressure for comfort when inverted and compound problem1. .
3. The fitted guide rod clamp is fitted with automatic locking spring which means two hands are required to enable height adjustment.

Solutions to the above have to date been the removal of the biggest (most powerful) of the two springs fitted, and the disengagement of the pressure spring from the clamp lever.
This later does of course mean that the clamp will have to be ‘remembered’

Materials used:
1. 35 X 17mm Beech stock. salvaged from old furniture.
2. Aluminium strip salvaged from old computer hardware.
3. 8 mm threaded rod from DIY store.
4. Coach bolts, screws, some nuts, wing nut and washers from stock bins.
5. 8mm Rod from existing Router Fence assembly.

DSC00376.jpg

Component parts of Lifter.

Top fixing for 8mm adjuster rod would ideally be a suitable barrel nut, as none were to hand for prototype a nylock nut and a ‘bent’ washer for location serves the purpose for now. The hole for the 8mm rod in top anchor bracket is drilled oversize to allow enough ‘swing’ of rod for disengagement etc.
The Nuts for the 6mm pivot bolts in front stringer could once again be barrel nuts for improved aesthetics. Current solution is to use standard nuts Force Fitted into suitable sized holes. Locking of the Bolts is achieved by drilling the pilot/clearance holes undersize causing the end of the bolts to cut their own threads and provide locking.
The wing Nut assembly is held in situ under load by a 22 mm flat bottomed recess for the washer and disengagement for rapid lowering of router is achieved by lifting the front stringer and swinging threaded rod forward through slot.

The finished design will allow for a Top Adjustment alternative threaded rod assembly to be fitted if needed for new Router table, although thoughts to date do not see any advantage to this as underside access is currently needed for guide clamp and Collet shaft locking anyway. This router has a long shaft extension so access to Collet nut should be available from above table.

I have not given any dimensions as these will be determined by individual router handle dimensions. Just to give some idea for a starting point the overall lengths of the components are: Aluminium Strips 120 mm, Fore-Aft members 270 mm. Width across Front stringer assembly 220 mm. Threaded rod 220 mm.

DSC00377.jpg

The assembled components.

DSC00378.jpg

DSC00379.jpg

The finished Lifter assembly fitted to mock-up Stand used to determine dimensions and operational effectiveness.

A rough check of Fine Height Adjustment capabilities indicates something in the order of 0.1 mm per 360 turn of the Wing nut. This of course is determined by the length of the Fore-Aft members and will be well within the parameters of the router itself or the stability of the finished table.

EDIT: See also Mailee's variation on the system
 

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johnelliott

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Chas, yes, I like that, especially the quick disconnect aspect. Next router table I make will probably use that idea. Very cunning. Only thing that would worry me is the router arms digging into the wooden frame and resisting small height adjustments. I presume, though, that this isn't happening?

John
 

tim

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Really smart thinking - and just when I'm building a router table as well :D

T
 

radicalwood

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Hi Chas,

Really like the idea I have the same router, I now know what my next job in the shop is going to be. Hope you don't mind me borrowing the idea. I agree with you it is a pain when under the table.
Going to rush home have some tea and start the mod this eve.

All the best

Neil
 

CHJ

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johnelliott":2lhlzw9o said:
Only thing that would worry me is the router arms digging into the wooden frame and resisting small height adjustments. I presume, though, that this isn't happening?

John
Edit: forgot to answer the basic question dohh!!....
No problem it runs smoothly with no sign of sticking.

Not had time to do 'in-use' trial of any significance yet. but as I used Beech (very dry and hard at that) I think the plastic handles are more likely to give if anything. There is obviously a certain amount of 'spring' resulting from the rod and linkage but it is not measurable with the 'normal' tools available in a woodshop. I wood say no more than if using a plastic table insert.

A few trials I have done in mock-up jig re: loading have not shown any measurable deflection, I don't think that for the sort of home made table setup that it was intended there is going to be anything more significant than would be shown by the inability to consistently hold workpiece hard down on table etc. I don't envisage it as a companion for those who have an Incra fence, and repeatability of setting is only achieved by gaging the cutter itself, but it is certainly capable of more than matching the 1mm per turn adjustment of some of the commercial units.
 

Bean

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Very Good Chas, an interesting adaptation of the plungebar principle. :D

I wonder what Tony will come back with to try to regain his title.


Bean
 

CHJ

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radicalwood":3n5ec9x3 said:
Hi Chas,
Hope you don't mind me borrowing the idea.
Neil
Not at all, been copying other people since I started to walk and talk, makes for a much easier life experience. I'm sure this has been done before, I just have this drive to adapt what is to hand when a problem bugs me into finding a fix.
 

tim

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Chas,

I've got a question about the height adjusting rod. As you say a barrel nut maybe the answer (rather than the solution you have for the mockup) but won't that also mean that the rod could spin out over time.

I'm wondering about two nuts or a lock nut recessed in the top side of the table top and then covered with a flush cap to keep debris out

I hope I've interpreted correctly and also been clear enough in my explanation (which as usual is crystal in my head but reads like gibberish :shock: :lol: )

Cheers

Tim
 

CHJ

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tim":12w00vo4 said:
Chas,

I've got a question about the height adjusting rod. As you say a barrel nut maybe the answer (rather than the solution you have for the mockup) but won't that also mean that the rod could spin out over time.
Sorry, being in engineering all my life I forget to pass on tips.

Several options here;

1. Solder the barrel nut to the threaded rod. (soft solder is adequate)
2. Drill small diameter hole through side of barrel nut and rod when assembled and insert a hard pin (end of broken drill shank for instance)
3. If 'channel' used for fixing is deep enough then a slim locking nut behind top of barrel nut.

Edit as an afterthought; if thread and nut grease free.
4. Epoxy, cyanoacrylate(Super glue) or Loctite would all be alternates as rotational torque on thread is low.


tim":12w00vo4 said:
I'm wondering about two nuts or a lock nut recessed in the top side of the table top and then covered with a flush cap to keep debris out .
Only time that something this elaborate (flush cap) would be needed I feel is if table was not sound enough to take wood screw fixing underneath. I would then bolt through table and cap recessed bolts in top.

The prime requirement is to have enough play in fixing to allow swing of rod for disengagement, a barrel nut would still be my first choice


Hope this helps.
 

CHJ

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Thanks TTT.

Anyone thinking of doing this do not be tempted to make the distance between Router and Adjusting rod too short, By reducing the radius of the cross member swing it causes an increase in the tightness of the arc that the adjusting rod has to cope with and removes some of the smoothness.
 

bob38s

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CHJ,
Came across your idea on our Aussie forum - great idea - you approached it from a slightly different angle to my own. I would like you to have a look at my idea as it solves the problem of lifting a heavy [Hitachi TR 12] router in a fairly easy manner using an "el cheapo" vice. Let me know what you think.
All the best for the new year to you and yours.
Regards,
Bob

http://www.woodworkforums.ubeaut.com.au/showthread.php?t=23893
 
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