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D_W

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SammyQ":2wmgxhpp said:
but that sign was a bit of a ruse.
:D

I assure you D_W, that was - by far - not the only piece of flummery we encountered from the Indian populace. I quite concur with you.

Sam
=D> :D :D
 

D_W

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Yeah, spokane is toasty compared to where you are. That makes it hard to see those numbers. I looked up the average daily humidity for spokane (65) and the average during the day (which is warmer, thus the lower RH) - 51%.

It's unusual in the lower 48 here to have somewhere in the summer where a typical temperature might be 68 degrees F midday.

I'd imagine the dewpoint in some places may be similar, but if their average daily temperature is 10 or 15 degrees F higher, the RH will be significantly lower.

Of course, as I was typing earlier today that we don't see humidity that high very often, it was 34 degrees F here and 90% RH (but it rained last night and is intermittently dribbling snow).

RH itself isn't as good of a gauge for feel as dewpoint and temperature. Dewpoint 70+ and temperature of 80F with some sun can feel horrible. Same dewpoint and 95 degrees feels absolutely horrible. "Sweat doesn't work" is kind of how it feels, though the RH number isn't very impressive with that combination.

Cloudy and 70 dewpoint with 75 degree temperature doesn't feel great, but it's not that bad. Paper gets soft with that combination, though.

(it's common for people around here to claim the same thing "it's 95 degrees and the humidity is also 95!!")
 

MikeG.

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D_W":3bykhlue said:
........I'd imagine that india is terrible as far as dewpoint and humidity.........)
You are generalising far too much. India is huge, and includes the Himalayas and the Thar desert. It has some of the wettest places on the planet, and some of the hottest, and some of the driest.

New Zealand, too, varies in climate enormously.
 

D_W

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I'm not publishing a scientific journal. I looked up auckland - avg. humidity about 80% (due to low temperature). I looked up a desert area in india up in the north - the average dewpoint is much higher than auckland.

There's no disclaimer that it's the entire country.
 

John Brown

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Maybe "toasty " means something else to you. Over here it means warm.
Spokane is not currently warmer than the Cotswolds. Unless it's a Celsius/Fahrenheit mix-up...
 

D_W

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Spokane in the summer would be toasty to the average person from England. 83F or just above 28C typical, with records close to 110. RH average in July and august is about 45 percent.

Yes, I"m sure it's colder there in the winter than most places in England. My point about RH was in reference to summer. It's unusual for us to have places where it's cool enough in summer to get high RH numbers. Not uncommon for it to be cool in winter since much of the country is landlocked.

I made a bad assumption -which is that people here only complain about humidity in the summer, even though the RH is higher in the winter in most places than the summer.
 

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MikeG.":3cuhmr5x said:
New Zealand, too, varies in climate enormously.
Varied by the hour Mike at least during our visits. :lol:
The locals said if I didn't like the weather to go and have a coffee by which time it would have changed.
 

Lons

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MikeG.":24tcsdof said:
Lons":24tcsdof said:
.......The locals said........
How did you know> Did you have a translator? :D
:lol: :lol: Yeah the lingo is a bit weird, they have an odd sense of humour as well. Spent quite a lot of time in Oz as well so I guess half way there.

Maybe a Geordie accent is a bit closer to theirs?
 

Phil Pascoe

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My b.i.l. Mike said after living in NZ for 11 years he could finally tell for certain the difference between an Australian accent and a Kiwi one, some of which are quite similar. His mate, a Maori said he must have been kidding, as any fool could tell. I asked him if he could tell the difference between Mike's accent and mine and he said no, they were identical. Mine is not particularly broad Cornish and Mike's is a very broad Plymouth. It depends what you are used to.
 

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AndyT":3s18n7y6 said:
Phil's in Cornwall.
Which is a bit like England, only moist.

Mizzle is a real word. It's a real thing, too. Just ask Phil.
 

MikeG.

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phil.p":2ikqkxhp said:
........ the difference between an Australian accent and a Kiwi one... which are quite similar.......
Just get them to say "fish 'n chips". The Kiwis say "fush 'n chups".

Thank goodness this thread has got onto a sensible topic after about 18 pages of drivel.
 

Phil Pascoe

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My nephew (aged six) asked my wife if she wanted to see his big dick.
Remember the old joke about the Kiwi farmer who had fifty tons of potatoes but couldn't get any sex?
The children got a good laugh, anyway, they weren't used to people pronouncing "R"s. - at which of course the Cornish excel. :lol:
 

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It was explained to me by a New Zealander that Australians and Kiwis are the same; the only difference is that Aussies are more rowdy.
 

Phil Pascoe

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I liked the Canadian asked the difference beween Canadians and Americans - Canadians get upset when someone slaughters dozens of kids in schoolyards and Americans get upset when someone says "f**k". :D
 

D_W

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Still 82% humidity, but at minus 5c with a brisk wind, it still feels crisp! I learned from this thread just how high the humidity is when the temps are cooler...never thought about it before, but it hasn't improved my sharpening to know that.
 

Ttrees

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David, one question about your tests I have.
Were you doing these tests planing with timber supported, or did you achieve your findings by swapping cutters often?
Tom
 

D_W

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Board in vise, rigid. Plane irons rotated every 50 strokes, or 200 feet to limit differences and get photos of the edges. Shortest planing iron still got rotated 4 times.

The boards that I have are half sap. Once most of the heart was planed, the remaining heart and sap was set aside and not used, so no board was allowed to get any appreciable spring relative to the weight of the plane and down force made when pushing from the rear only.
 
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