Drill press restoration ( again ! )

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sawtooth-9

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About 30 years ago, I came across a Swedish geared head drill press.
I re - built it and it has been great. I replaced all bearings and replaced all the wiring. She has worked beautifully ever since.
The last place we lived had a serious rust environment, so I ( foolishly ) covered her in grease
Now, the grease has solidified ( polymerised ) and the machine is almost "frozen"

Today, I started to strip her down. The grease on the column had turned into "glue" so I took the first layer of "varnish" off with a razor blade.
Took as much as possible off the machine to reduce weight ready to "lay her down" so I can slide off the head.
Having dropped a Multico mortiser on my foot, I will use the tractor to lay down and remove the geared head and then polish the column.

If there is interest, I will follow up and post pics.
 

sawtooth-9

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I don't know how old this machine is, but it was no spring chicken when I first restored it in about 1990. It's a HEAVY cast iron job and have had to lay the press on the ground to remove the head.
I don't have any lifting gear here, so I carefully roped up the "beast" and attached a sling to the top of the column - the other end attached to the bucket on the tractor.
Great theory, which almost worked !
When the head was about 18 inches from the ground, it swung just enough to bash against the DOL starter for the rip saw. Ouch ! Tomorrow I will source a new DOL starter - a bit of an expensive mistake !
Have started the clean up of the column and the base, and will post a couple of pics in the next few days.
At this stage, I have no idea how I will lift the newly painted head onto the column - any suggestions welcome
 

sawtooth-9

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Before I lowered the Beast, I split the gearbox.
I rebuilt this in the 1990's and it is still in perfect condition. The bearings and gears look good - just re-pack a little fresh grease. I am a little surprised because she has done quite a bit of heavy work over the years.
Have checked out the two speed motor, and the winding resistances and mega is good.
Looks like the Swedes built good machines !
 

TFrench

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Sounds like an arboga or strands? I got the head back on my grimston (english design very similar to an arboga) with an engine crane, but it was on its limit for height. If you've got a stout beam you can get the column under, I would get a small chain block rigged up to lift the head, then move the column under it.
 

sawtooth-9

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Sounds like an arboga or strands? I got the head back on my grimston (english design very similar to an arboga) with an engine crane, but it was on its limit for height. If you've got a stout beam you can get the column under, I would get a small chain block rigged up to lift the head, then move the column under it.
It's a Strands
No suitable beams, I will check the lifting height of my engine crane - but I doubt it.
Might have to resort to a couple of local farmers and ladders ! Oh yes, and a couple of cases of beer !
 

sawtooth-9

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This is a pic of the "smashed" DOL motor starter !
7A.jpg
 

sawtooth-9

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Have started to clean the pillar and base - but interrupted by having to cut down a very heavy dead tree which was ready to fall across the driveway entrance !
We have had some bad weather, so have had to do a fair bit of clearing up after gale force winds and MONTHS of rain
Hopefully, will get back to the workshop soon.
Below are some "bits" ready to strip and re-paint
8A.jpg
8B.jpg
8C.jpg
8D.jpg
8E.jpg
8F.jpg
 

sawtooth-9

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Have chipped off the old paint and painted the base.
Then chipped off all the old paint from the gear head.
The de- rusting was a bit of a challenge - but finally done.
My biggest concern was lifting the head onto the column, but the old engine crane had enough lift to do the job. The trick was placing the lifting ropes to get the balance of the head right to lower onto the column. Wasn't perfect but a little "giggling" and the job was done - easier than I expected.
Tomorrow, the head gets two coats of paint.
 

Sandyn

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My biggest concern was lifting the head onto the column, but the old engine crane had enough lift to do the job
It's fun, isn't it. and scary. I didn't have a hoist, so the way I did it on my Meddings was to lay the body on the floor and fit the column to it, then slide the column all the way into the head. Use the column to lift the drill vertical, then get the head up the column. The reverse of how you got your head off.
The Strands looks looks like a superb quality drill. Look forward to seeing more pictures.
 

sawtooth-9

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So, I have finally managed to get the "beast" together - all painted and looking good.
This is a Strands model S68 serial number 31653 and the year of manufacture is 1965.
I am amazed at how this machine has maintained a concentricity of less than 0.4 thou ! ( after a little adjustment )
However, the two speed switch has become VERY sticky and I suspected I may have to replace the switch. The problem is, after so many years, the mechanical lubrication of the switch is "gone". A careful spray of WD40 along the switch shaft ( taking care not to spray the electrical components ), and the switch lives again.
A test run - and she is running better than ever - quiet and smooth. I am happy with the result.
This was never an attempt to make the machine new again, but rather to get her back to a perfect running condition - warts and all !
I have no idea of the original colour of these drills, but I had some "left over" paint from the Colchester restoration - and it has ended up looking good.
 

Sandyn

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That is a handsome looking drill. It has a look of precision and beautifully restored. It will be a pleasure to use. The old machines are great. When I measured the runout inside the MT2 of my ~1950's Meddings, I couldn't understand why the DTI wasn't making contact. I checked a couple of times. It was making contact, but there was just the tiniest flutter of the needle.

With a new keyless chuck, it's a different story, about 0.18mm, or about 0.5thou at the jaws.
 

Sideways

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Can you say anything about the motor ? I assume it's not a standard motor inside the top "box" but rather something bespoke built into the very solid head.
I like the look of these but the idea of a problem with the motor windings being v costly to repair makes me nervous about them.
Thanks for the write up - v interesting :)
 

sawtooth-9

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Can you say anything about the motor ? I assume it's not a standard motor inside the top "box" but rather something bespoke built into the very solid head.
I like the look of these but the idea of a problem with the motor windings being v costly to repair makes me nervous about them.
Thanks for the write up - v interesting :)
The motor is original and built into the bottom "box" of the head.
The windings are easily removed, if necessary, by removing four locating grub screws that go through the casting ( two on each side ). It's no more difficult than removing the windings from any motor. The whole gearbox assembly ( top "box" is easily taken apart giving free access for the removal of the windings.
These days, the cost of re-winding motors is eye-watering !
The quality of these motors is really quite remarkable, having checked the winding insulation - I expect it will outlive me.
 
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