Dovetail cutting saws

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Craig22

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...The critical thing is to file every other one from one side and then turn it and do the others.

That is true for crosscut saws. For dovetailing, you are going with the grain, so rip cut is the better choice - and it is easier to file.
 

Jacob

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That is true for crosscut saws. For dovetailing, you are going with the grain, so rip cut is the better choice - and it is easier to file.
Yes to rip cut but you need to alternate sides to give the saw a trace of a set equal both ways, even if it's just a burr from the file. You can't otherwise set a 14tpi saw very easily
 

Craig22

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Yes to rip cut but you need to alternate sides to give the saw a trace of a set equal both ways, even if it's just a burr from the file. You can't otherwise set a 14tpi saw very easily

Yes - I accept that. A dovetail saw needs very little set to cut a narrow kerf.
 

D_W

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Some triangular files have rounded corners? I understood that saw files should have rounded corners as if they have sharp corners it can lead to cracks in the plate developing from the bottom of teeth.

They're all somewhat rounded, it's just a matter of how much. If they came to a crisp point on the corner, they would break off on the tip instantly and once one or two teeth chip, those behind it will follow very soon as they have no support on one side of the cut.

Bahco files are more rounded, which is great for file longevity, but not so great for really small teeth as you can actually have the teeth clog. I've never had it happen on anything else other than a kerf saw and a dovetail saw that had gullets a bit shallow and round. But if you cheat and try to use too big of a file on a small saw, you can end up making the teeth pack with dust every couple of strokes.

It may sound dumb, but I try to mark which files I've used for saws or match the gullet profile to the file first, otherwise if you pick a smaller corner, you'll waste time cutting the gullets out of the teeth before you can even file the teeth properly.
 

Argus

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Brilliant!

A sharpening thread by the back door............ this one slipped past my Radar!

 

chris watford

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update.

I have 2 dovetails and 2 tenons, fortunately one of each is relatively sharp, good enough for my trial cuts. I have cleaned them up and applied a machine wax. The handles need some future works, one of them the handle is loose.
I also found some old saw files, including a couple of small triangular ones which would suit the dovetails, so as Jacob suggests will have a go at the blunter saws first, if I fail I can send to a saw doctors.
 
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