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Double Glazing or not?

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GregW

Greg W.
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My usual glass supplier won't do DG units with a furniture stamp on anymore, I guess it's to do with building regs and being able to see the stamp to prove it's toughened :dunno:

They will still supply single glazing with a furniture stamp on though, can't really see the logic of it.
CE registered manufacturing standards.
 

Jacob

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A friend years ago was taken to court for fitting uPVC windows in a conservation area. He was told they should have been oak frames. He said he'd been a professional decorator for thirty years and had never come across an oak framed window - they insisted he was wrong. I'm 67, I've never seen an oak framed window. They don't exist here.
Nor me. Except occasionally oak cills. This is a common mistake as oak rots much worse than pine if damp and doesn't hold paint too well. In fact I've taken out oak cill windows where the pine right down to the tenons is still in good order but the oak right next to it is rotting away.
Redwood is most common with pitch pine next.
 

Jacob

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Worked for a firm who used the Sylacryl backing and linseed oil for face putty, absolute rubbish way to do it in my experience. Sylacril takes ages to dry as does putty, the only advantage was the putty is easier to do neatly if you dust it off properly.
.....
Putty is very cheap, very easy to apply and given normal maintenance (paint) can last 100+ years.
I wouldn't have thought it would work well with DG as thermal movement in a large amount of glass would dislodge the putty, but I'm just guessing.
One odd detail with linseed oil paints is that you can paint it straight on to fresh putty. Not that surprising as it's more or less the same stuff but thinner.
 

Ollie78

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CE registered manufacturing standards.
If they provide a letter or certificate it is acceptable, also you can take a photo before glazing it.

A bit about the qualities of the stadip or other accoustic glass, it's all about the interlayer which is preventing the transfer of sound.
There is mention above of the spacing of panes relating to different frequencies etc. This is certainly correct but I think a bit different if you have normal glass vs accoustic. I wonder if there is a different resonance calculation for each type of glass ?
I would like to try a dgu with accoustic laminate in both panes.


Ollie
 
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Just4Fun

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The only upgrades that pays off economically when counting in time materials and energy costs are to install modern rubber seals on the inner casement.
OK, That is interesting. We have a lot of windows so whatever we do has to be economically viable

Proper rebates for inner casements became common around 1900 in Finland. The best way to create such a rebate to allow for properly complessed modern rubber seals is to nail a batten inside the jamb so a rebate is formed.
Also interesting. Our house has jambs which the casement closes against, but whether that is original or retrofit is difficult to say given the paint now covering them.

If you still want to upgrade I have seen a third casement added halfways between the inner and the outer.
hmmm .... I have considered that but it is not easy to add that and cope with the existing window stays etc. I will give that more thought.

Thanks for your comments. Your comments have put me off making new outer casements and pointed me to simpler solutions (battens and rubber seals). Simpler, easier and cheaper - what's not to like?
 

GregW

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If they provide a letter or certificate it is acceptable, also you can take a photo before glazing it.

A bit about the qualities of the stadip or other accoustic glass, it's all about the interlayer which is preventing the transfer of sound.
There is mention above of the spacing of panes relating to different frequencies etc. This is certainly correct but I think a bit different if you have normal glass vs accoustic. I wonder if there is a different resonance calculation for each type of glass ?
I would like to try a dgu with accoustic laminate in both panes.

Ollie
I do single glaze in 6.8mm acoustic laminate. In comparison to 4mm standard it a heaven to clients. Impossible for Grage1, and not ok without permit on significant Grate2.

Double glazing 4/16/4 is great price/quality standard.

Triple glaze 100mm frame, 64mm casements, 4/10/4/10/4 works miracles. It’s massive in comparison to 4mm glaze 80mm casement frame, and really rare due council control listings.
 

baldkev

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Nor me. Except occasionally oak cills. This is a common mistake as oak rots much worse than pine if damp and doesn't hold paint too well. In fact I've taken out oak cill windows where the pine right down to the tenons is still in good order but the oak right next to it is rotting away.
Redwood is most common with pitch pine next.
A few years ago i worked on a farmhouse with oak windows and doors. Looked great. Unfortunately one of the patio door sets never gets opened, so no-one noticed the bottom rails had swelled and were constantly wet. The doors were only about 4 years old and the bottom galf inch or so was basically mush.
I must admit, i was extremely suprised, ive always believed oak was supposed to be great outside.
 

sometimewoodworker

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I must admit, i was extremely suprised, ive always believed oak was supposed to be great outside.
There are very few wood speeches that will withstand that kind of condition. Sweet Chestnut is the only one that is likely to survive, that I know of. Many speeches will do OK if protected from standing in water few last with water and air contact.
 

KieranJW

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Worked for a firm who used the Sylacryl backing and linseed oil for face putty, absolute rubbish way to do it in my experience. Sylacril takes ages to dry as does putty, the only advantage was the putty is easier to do neatly if you dust it off properly.

Repair care Dryseal is good but silly money, Hodgesons heritage is a bit cheaper, I use mostly Timbaglaze from chemfix. I know a place that use Stixall which is only a fiver a tube. I did a test with it and it works pretty well, I guess they are all pretty similar chemically. I find them good if you need to spray finish top coat after glazing ( which I try to avoid).

Fensa is not concerned with repair or restoration work.

There is certainly not enough building inspectors to physically inspect every window that gets installed.
I think its a bit like electrical work, technically you are not even supposed to change a socket or light switch but there is a bit about being a "competent person" somewhere in there, which means you can do it as long as you aren`t a total halfwit.

Ollie
Same here I used repair care but now use timbaglaze. I never used silacryl as I used that in place of acrylic caulk.
 

Jacob

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Same here I used repair care but now use timbaglaze. I never used silacryl as I used that in place of acrylic caulk.
I don't see putty working on DG unless it is in a massive fillet proportional to the glass thickness. Georgian windows had very thin glass down to 2 or 3mm and very tiny rebates 5 x 14mm typical. The strength of the putty fillet being roughly in proportion to the glass thickness. Thicker glass, more putty required, mainly because of the power behind thermal movement.
 

KieranJW

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I don't see putty working on DG unless it is in a massive fillet proportional to the glass thickness. Georgian windows had very thin glass down to 2 or 3mm and very tiny rebates 5 x 14mm typical. The strength of the putty fillet being roughly in proportion to the glass thickness. Thicker glass, more putty required, mainly because of the power behind thermal movement.
Yeah sorry this is when single glazing and not using linseed paint. (Sorry I mentioned this in a previous post)
If using linseed paint I would use linseed putty if the customer is using something else I use he polymers (I do try to convince them to use linseed and explain the benefits)
 

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