Quantcast

Danish Oil for Food Finish

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

andrewm

Established Member
Joined
30 Oct 2003
Messages
609
Reaction score
0
Location
Cambridge, UK
I got the old barbeque out for the first time last weekend and notice that the wooden side shelf is looking a bit the worse for wear. I was considering sanding it down and refinishing it. Would Danish Oil be suitable for this? Thinking about it it is unlikely that it will have food placed directly on it but I wouldn't like to use anything toxic.

Andrew
 

Gower

Established Member
Joined
28 Nov 2004
Messages
366
Reaction score
0
Location
Cardiff
Hello Andrew,
I've just gone on line to ask a similar question. I've just finished a chopping board in laminated beech (an off cut of a kitchen worktop) and was wondering wether to use a coat of sanding sealer prior to several coats of olive oil. I think you can buy a dedicated food finish but I can't remember the maker - probably Rustins. I don't think it's a good idea to use teak or tung oil.

Cheers

Jim
 

Keith Smith

Established Member
Joined
1 Mar 2004
Messages
511
Reaction score
0
Location
Out in the sticks in rural Shropshire
Andrew, Danish oil, finishing oil and tung oil should all be marked "Toy Safe" on the can and are fine for worktops, the only exception I know of is Organoil Danish style oil which is not recommended for worktops.

Tung oil is OK for outside but I don't find it dries as well or gives as good a finish as Danish/Finishing oil.

Lemon oil and the ones recommended for food surfaces are not up to protecting exterior woodwork.

Keith
 

trevtheturner

Established Member
Joined
26 Feb 2003
Messages
1,144
Reaction score
0
Location
Herefordshire, UK.
Jim,

Whichever oil you decide to use, do not use a sanding sealer first. As its name implies, it will seal the wood and merely set up a barrier between the wood and the oil.

Cheers,

Trev.
 

Gower

Established Member
Joined
28 Nov 2004
Messages
366
Reaction score
0
Location
Cardiff
Thanks Trev.
I've used 4 coats of olive oil (Extra Virgin of course!) and I'm very pleased with the finish. Time will tell as to durability.

Regards,

Jim
 

Frank D.

Established Member
Joined
2 Dec 2004
Messages
446
Reaction score
0
Location
Montreal, Canada
Hi Gower, the olive oil probably won't hold up too long but it does look good and it's easy to apply. You should also keep an eye out becaue it can turn rancid since it doesn't cure; this is the biggest drawback of using food oils for finishing. Usually they aren't recommended but I'd say now that it's on just see how it goes, you may not have any problems.
Most finish deterioration comes from the sun. If your barbecue is covered you don't have to worry. Otherwise a finish with UV inhibitors is a good idea (all finishes are non-toxic when cured and safe for indirect, non-intensive food contact) but then again if you really want to play it safe go with an edible finish. Two solutions are pure tung oil or pure boiled linseed oil. Here in North america if the container says "100% pure" there are no chemical dryers or additives. We also have "Tried and True" varnish which is made from pure linseed oil.
Just a few thoughts,
Frank
 

Latest posts

Top