Dangerous Pallets?

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

whatknot

Established Member
Joined
29 Jul 2017
Messages
939
Reaction score
41
Location
Cornwall UK
Mmmm quality papers, soft strong and absorbent ;-)

Best use for any newspaper

As to the Guardian or any newspaper giving a balanced view? there is no such thing they are all biased with their own agenda

I am an ex newsagent and gave up reading any newspaper years ago, and more recently gave up watching or listening to the news at the start of covid, I get fed the odd story by my wife and a couple of friends or the odd post on facebook, otherwise I don't miss it one bit you can't rust any news source

As to the original post re pallets and safety, having looked into it a few years back I would agree there are some dangerous to use pallets, so why take the risk when there is no need?
 

TBay-Paul

Member
Joined
14 Mar 2022
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Location
Anglesey
Just to throw the cat amongst the pigeons and also to make others aware what are the views on burning pallets either in a log burner or in a open fire pit? Thinking about chemical fumes and smoke, tar etc.
 

Doug71

Established Member
Joined
28 Aug 2016
Messages
2,522
Reaction score
1,250
Location
Yorkshire
I'm always bemused why people would want things made of pallets in their house when you really don't know the history of them. It's not just what they are treated with but what they have carried. I always picture some barrels of dodgy chemicals leaking or splashing over them as they make their way across the ocean from who knows where then eventually someone uses the wood to make something for their kitchen.

Just to throw the cat amongst the pigeons and also to make others aware what are the views on burning pallets either in a log burner or in a open fire pit? Thinking about chemical fumes and smoke, tar etc.

All I know is the blue pallets turn the flames a green colour which looks nice but probably isn't good for the environment :dunno:
 

Julie

Member
Joined
28 Mar 2022
Messages
6
Reaction score
10
Location
Outwell, Norfolk
Ok so what about the treated wood we already buy, ie the stuff that has been pressure treated with:

Chromate Copper Arsenate: Chromate Copper Arsenate (CCA) is a pesticide containing chromium, copper and arsenic that protects wood against termites, fungi and other pests that can degrade or threaten the integrity of wood products. It has been used as a wood preservative pesticide since the 1940s
I have worked with timber and cut tons of it over more than 25 years, I always wear a mask, particularly when working with exotic hardwoods, as the tree's themselves contain a strong cocktail of chemicals in their sap and resins, this is how they survive whilst being attacked from all sides by wood munching fawna!.

As to CCA, speaking for the UK this was banned back in the 1970's, wood is fumigated to kill off parasites, but it all disperses while standing, so there is no measurable residue, as to pressure treated timber, it might still be blue green, but you won't find CCA even in trace amounts because it's not treated with that, it's dyed to look the same, but Arsenic, Copper Sulphate, and Chromium are not used, and have not since my apprenticeship, I won't speak for the States, as I have no knowledge of the approved practices across the pond, but the OSHA have some very different ideas about Health & Safety to our various governing bodies

I hope this is helpful

Julie x
 

Julie

Member
Joined
28 Mar 2022
Messages
6
Reaction score
10
Location
Outwell, Norfolk
I have worked with timber and cut tons of it over more than 25 years, I always wear a mask, particularly when working with exotic hardwoods, as the tree's themselves contain a strong cocktail of chemicals in their sap and resins, this is how they survive whilst being attacked from all sides by wood munching fawna!.

As to CCA, speaking for the UK this was banned back in the 1970's, wood is fumigated to kill off parasites, but it all disperses while standing, so there is no measurable residue, as to pressure treated timber, it might still be blue green, but you won't find CCA even in trace amounts because it's not treated with that, it's dyed to look the same, but Arsenic, Copper Sulphate, and Chromium are not used, and have not since my apprenticeship, I won't speak for the States, as I have no knowledge of the approved practices across the pond, but the OSHA have some very different ideas about Health & Safety to our various governing bodies

I hope this is helpful

Julie x
Before anyone corrects me, yes I am aware CCA or similar preservatives were approved for the use existing pre treated material, but it's approved uses were so few as to be minimal in their impact,, and none of this material remains in the supply chain even as reclaimed timber as it was not approved for use in buildings, DIY supply wood was never CCA treated to my knowledge, I worked for a large chain and none of our timber contained this substance or similar or it would have had to be included in our COSH information, once again none of what I am stating relates to anything to do with the regulations or practices in The United States, I know very little of this since I have never worked there
 

stuart little

Established Member
Joined
17 Apr 2021
Messages
551
Reaction score
258
Location
Herefordshire
Mmmm quality papers, soft strong and absorbent ;-)

Best use for any newspaper

As to the Guardian or any newspaper giving a balanced view? there is no such thing they are all biased with their own agenda

I am an ex newsagent and gave up reading any newspaper years ago, and more recently gave up watching or listening to the news at the start of covid, I get fed the odd story by my wife and a couple of friends or the odd post on facebook, otherwise I don't miss it one bit you can't rust any news source

As to the original post re pallets and safety, having looked into it a few years back I would agree there are some dangerous to use pallets, so why take the risk when there is no need?
Hi Whatknot, I'm in total agreement with you - glad I'm not the only one with that op[inion.
Stuart
 

stuart little

Established Member
Joined
17 Apr 2021
Messages
551
Reaction score
258
Location
Herefordshire
I'm always bemused why people would want things made of pallets in their house when you really don't know the history of them. It's not just what they are treated with but what they have carried. I always picture some barrels of dodgy chemicals leaking or splashing over them as they make their way across the ocean from who knows where then eventually someone uses the wood to make something for their kitchen.



All I know is the blue pallets turn the flames a green colour which looks nice but probably isn't good for the environment :dunno:
Blue pallets are supposed to be returned to the origin, & not re-used unofficialy, so I've was informed by 'Pallet Men' I knew.
 
Joined
5 Nov 2020
Messages
552
Reaction score
502
Location
Ireland
I think scientifically soaking the risk associated with using MB marked pallet wood is likely to be insignificant.

However given that there are plenty of risks in wood working already, using MB pallets is a risk I can, and do, avoid. So only HT- marked pallet wood for me, thanks.
 

wallace

Established Member
Joined
13 Feb 2011
Messages
2,117
Reaction score
227
Location
county durham
Blue pallets are supposed to be returned to the origin, & not re-used unofficialy, so I've was informed by 'Pallet Men' I knew.
I worked at chep (blue pallets) for 20 years, they do not treat any of their pallets, all they do is paint with water based paint. I've seen some blue pallets with HT, heat treated on them.
The timber they use comes from latvia.
Chep dont sell pallets, they just hire them so when you see stray pallets some poor company will be getting a bill of £12 per lost pallet.
They also do tiny pallets for aldi, lidl, they are made with some weird hardwood that is treated.
 
Top