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Dangerous oak, beech dust particles

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Darren D

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Sadly, I've been reading the Festool catoglue recently. They have a CT range of dust extractors for normal duty and a CTM range for toxic particles. According to the catalogue, under German law oak and beech dust falls into the toxic category - I assume because of the particle size (didn't mention MDF though).
The warnings next to the CTM extractors are quite scary - make sure the filters are changed by qualified service people, make sure the seals are serviced regularly, etc.
I quite fancy making oak furniture especially but this is worrying. Does anyone know if what I'm saying is true, and if so do you take extra care when working with oak and beech? Would MDF falll into this toxic category too?
Darren
 

Woodythepecker

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Hi Darren, Yes the fine dust from both oak and beech (especially spalted beech) are pretty nasty, but there again so is most hardwoods, and as you have already mentioned mdf is another culprit.

Although i have no knowledge of the particular Festool extractor you are talking about, i very much doubt that the filter within it really needs to be changed by a qualified service person. If it is just like the cartridge or bag type that other extractors use i cannot see why the user cannot drop a replacement in him or herself. But as i have said i do not know this model so i maybe wrong.

You ask if you have to take care when using oak and beech. Yes you certainly should, but this is the same for all hardwoods and man made boards. I have a ducted dust extractor system in my workshop and to back this up i have a air filter hanging from the joists, but even with all this i still wear a powered Trend Airshield mask. You cannot be to careful where fine dust and your lungs are concerned.

Do not let any of the articles you read let you stop using any wood, just be careful and use your common sense.

Good luck

Woody
 

Philly

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Darren
As far as I'm aware, ANY fine dust is a serious health risk. And the Government agrees! :shock:
I wouldn't freak out too much-using proper precautions such as a dust mask and extraction should be enough.
Hope this helps
Philly :D
 

jonny boy

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Darren,

I think this may be due to German standards being especially keen. In most instruction manuals, the dust and noise levels are usually alway's referring to German levels of health and safety.

cheers,
jonny.
 

CHJ

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Darren D":crq4tvbb said:
..snip..The warnings next to the CTM extractors are quite scary - make sure the filters are changed by qualified service people, make sure the seals are serviced regularly, etc.
...snip...Darren
Darren, Festool are probably covering themselves for an industrial situation where the equivalent of the "Health and Safety at Work Act" would apply to any employee. Any person handling the toxic/hazardous waste from the filters must have received adequate instruction and be provided with adequate respiratory protection for themselves.

Remember when you change or clean out any filter system you need to ensure you do not expose yourself to the very hazard the filter was there to protect you from.

I once caught a guy cleaning a dust filter in a confined space with an airline :!:
 

cambournepete

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CHJ":1idmwf78 said:
Remember when you change or clean out any filter system you need to ensure you do not expose yourself to the very hazard the filter was there to protect you from.
Which is why Festool put caps on their bags so you can seal the dust in before removing the bags from the vacuum.

Also they have rebranded their vacuums from CT to CTL to reflect a higher accredited rating of filtration.
 

CHJ

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cambournepete":2w7nbup1 said:
Which is why Festool put caps on their bags so you can seal the dust in before removing the bags from the vacuum..
You get what you pay for I guess, I only have the luxury of using Festool equipment when in Bavaria where the household income can support its purchase for DIY use.
 

edmund

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If you think the ill effects of oak and beech are bad - dermatitis and nasal cancer (although rare for beech but does cause some decrease in lung function) - check out the health risks for the following:
Ceylon Satinwood - dermatitis, nasal irritation, headaches and swelling of the scrotum! Same for Teak which also causes nausea and oversensitivity to light.
Yew is also highly toxic - intestinal irritation, visual disturbances, lung congestion and reduced blood pressure.
Mansonia - as well as the usual respiratory problems and skin irritation it can also cause cardiac disorders; the bark contains a cardiac poison.
And I just used to be worried about chopping my fingers off :lol:
 

Matt1245

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So how do you go about protecting yourself when using darkside methods?

I always wear a mask, but you still end up with it all over the bench, floor etc.

Matt.
 

Gill

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Matt1245":2bifxget said:
So how do you go about protecting yourself when using darkside methods?

I always wear a mask, but you still end up with it all over the bench, floor etc.

Matt.
Darth Vader also wore a mask and favoured the Dark Side. Perhaps that's why he chose to wear a long flowing robe; to diguise the debris falling all around him.

Gill (Wheeee! It's been a long time since I had to make a break for the bunker
:D )




PS I believe that's suitable for family viewing. You've no idea how tempted I was to go beyond the boundaries of acceptability :twisted: :) .
 

Taffy Turner

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edmund":2jo6w8xd said:
Ceylon Satinwood - dermatitis, nasal irritation, headaches and swelling of the scrotum!
I have just spent a very stressful 10 minutes trying to work out under what circumstances you could possibly get sawdust on that particular area :shock: :shock: :shock: - are there any naturist woodworkers out there? :?

If so, then I can only point out that it is your own fault!! [-( [-X 8-[
 

CHJ

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Taffy, Physical contact with a particular area is not necessary if the poison/irritant enters the blood stream through another avenue.

My own experience with IROKO taught me that whole body reaction can be very violent and rapid despite wearing maximum clothing cover, air fed face mask and high volume dust extraction.

The allergic reaction inducing chemical/substance within the IROKO got to me either in the filtered air or via skin contact on my hands/wrists/head/neck but the reaction got to places best left without a description and far to uncomfortable to risk even touching the stuff whenever I'm in a wood yard.
 

Taffy Turner

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Hmmm - makes you think that!

I have never been a fan of Iroko as I am mildy allergic to it - itchy rash on exposed skin, runny nose and eyes, wheezing etc, but having read this topic I am never going near the stuff again!

(Well, at least not until the two huge gates I have made from it need sanding down and staining again). :evil:
 

GCR

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I have to agree with others on this thread, any dust is potentially dangerous and I believe you get more sensitive as you get older/expose yourself to dust. I try to sand outside, but even then the dust blows around. I do wear a mask and judging by the state of my workshop after a heavy sanding session its just as well.

One thing that does occur to me however is that if the exhaust from any extractor is vented outside, then the fineness of filtration becomes academic. Although there is some heat loss. I notice that some folk put their extractors in an "outside" compartment. This must give a welcome gain in noise reduction as well.

Bob
 
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