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Anonymous

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Ok folks, these are really daft questions, I'm sure, but anyway...

Just took delivery of my first ever compressor (reasonable sized Axminster one), and having had a quick play, got a couple of questions...

First off, the compressor manual says to drain the compressor when finished with it (or at least before leaving it overnight). Now, I've fitted a female type PCL fitting to it, so when I disconnect the tool and hose, the valve's shut...so, what's the recommended way to decompress it? I used a spare male PCL fitting to do it (plugged it in, turned on the compressor valve, let the air out), but I only had the spare fitting cos I bought one not knowing the air-nailer I got came with one anyway. Without it, I couldn't see an easy way of releasing the air pressure.

Next off - the air-nailer says to make sure the air-line is deflated before disconnecting from the hose - how do you do that? Just turn off the valve at the compressor end and nailing until there's nothing left? Sounds like that'd likely cause a jam? As it was, cos I have the PCL fittings (female on the tool end of the hose), I just pulled the gun off the hose - a huge escape of air while the PCL valve closed, but seemed to work. Is there a better/proper way of doing this?

I'll do a review of both the compressor and the air-nailer (the Axminster masonry nailer) when I have the chance to use them in anger; first impressions are good, but the manuals leave a HUGE amount to be desired! Bought the pair with the intention of using them to insulate/dry-line the garage/workshop, but they'll no doubt get more use than that.

Cheers
~Esp
 

johnelliott

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When they say drain they mean to drain the water that form in the tank as a result of compressing the air (which contains water vapour). There should be a drain valve underneath the tank. Open it until all the water comes out and then shut it. No need to lose your compressed air
I wouldn't worry about the air in the hose
John
 

ike

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so, what's the recommended way to decompress it?
There's normally a small screw valve at or near the bottom of the tank.
make sure the air-line is deflated before disconnecting from the hose - how do you do that?
Just unplug it. Pssst schhh! - no big deal.

nailing until there's nothing left? Sounds like that'd likely cause a jam?
Yes, quickest way to pipper the firing pin.

cheers

Ike (c/w Axminster Extreme 2)
 
A

Anonymous

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LOL - I knew that terminology would cause confusion! (so why didn't I change it? cos I couldn't think of any other words). Yes, they say drain the water daily, but the manual also says to bleed the air out if you leave the compressor for a long time (over 24 hours) - decompress, if you like. That's the bit I'm asking about - how to decompress the air tank.

OK with the air hose - i'll just have to brace myself to stop jumping outta me skin when I pop the tool off the hose!

Thanks for answering John, and at least my second question was understandable enough!
 
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Anonymous

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ike":2yo02vnv said:
so, what's the recommended way to decompress it?
There's normally a small screw valve at or near the bottom of the tank.
Thanks Ike - that's the water drain valve, but you're saying I can use that to decompress the air too? OK, I'll try that :)

Pssst schhh? Lol - a bit more explosive than that, it was, but seemed to do the trick anyway.
 

ike

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but you're saying I can use that to decompress the air too?
Yup - it'll blow out the condensate then just leave it open. :wink:
 
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Anonymous

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I have an axminster AWC25HP oil lubed compressor. On the opposite side of the guages is a small keyring - pull it out to release the excess compressed air if you need to. Be careful though, if there is too much pressure in the tank, it can really come out violently. I only use it if there is less thn 50 PSI in the tank, otherwise I put on the air duster, and clean up some stuff.
 
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Anonymous

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Hey Kong - yup, that's the same compressor i just took delivery of - that keyring thing is the safety valve, for when (hopefully if, hopefully never) the compressor is over-pressured, isn't it? I didn't want to play with that (although i did reach for it at one point!), in case it was a one-time safety release! I was running at about 95 psi anyway, cos I was playing with knocking 13 gauge masonry nails through studwork into bricks!

Like I said - the manual leaves a LOT to be desired!

Cheers for the responses guys, I have a few things to try out.
~Esp
 

Travis Byrne

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You have gotten good advise on draining the water. (I only do mine about once a week).
I also disconnect the tool like the other said. ( just don't aim the hose toward your face)
Now about draining the air pressure. I have 3 compressor. One is hard wired to 220 V. The other 2 are just plug in type. I never drain the air off any of them. I turn off the electrical switch on them. This way they will not run themselves to death if they develope a leak. If you drain the air each time, your compressor will wear out sooner.

One compressor is a 1 hp and 5 years old. Still running good.
One compressor is a 3 hp and 15 years old. Still running good
One compressor is a 6 1/2 Hp and 8 years old. Still running good
I hope this helps
Travis

Travis
 
A

Anonymous

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Hi Travis,

I think my question would be: how often do you use the compressors? I don't see myself using mine too often, and there's the chance it'd just stand there for months on end with no use; at that rate of usage, I think decompressing it would probably be for the best. Mind you, I would think there'd be an amount of leakage anyway, and letting it stand for a long time would result in it slowly decompressing on its own. No idea as to what that'd do to the machinery or tank though

Thanks,
~Esp
 
A

Anonymous

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It is certainy food for thought, mine gets used 1 hour per week average and I have been draining it every time. Like you say, the manual is hardly worth having, if you know nothing about compressors!
 

Mcluma

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He Espedair,

I also bought my compressor and nailgun from Axminster
This is mine

the nailer

But i added this maintenance set on the compressor, this takes out all water and put a limited oil in, IMPORTANT for the nailer, otherwize you get jammers
 

ike

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It makes no difference whether left pressurized or not if only for occasional use. I don't know if it could act like a potential bomb in the event your workshop catches fire (but lead plugs/ safety valves spring to mind) - definitely not ........ if you leave the drain valve open.

uh...end of ramble :roll:

Mcluma wrote
This is mine
Ditto - noisy pipper ennit?
 

Mcluma

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He Ike,

But it is a whole lot better then those 1 cylinder machines, :wink: I needed the pressure for the workshop, and for the airwrench and other air operated tools. Euuh that is what i told the wife :lol:
 
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Anonymous

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ike":3ph9u7pq said:
Ditto - noisy pipper ennit?
The noise was why I got the oil-lubed one - not only cheaper, but quieter, and should be longer lasting.

Didn't get the full mainenance set Mcluma, but got an 'on the gun' oiler...just need to work out how to transfer air-tool oil from a litre bottle into an ikkle-diddy screw hole into the oiler! Methinx I'll be buying some oil can type things in the near future - heck, even getting the lube into the compressor was messy enough!
 

Travis Byrne

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Ike wrote
I don't know if it could act like a potential bomb in the event your workshop catches fire (but lead plugs/ safety valves spring to mind)
If my shop catches on fire, its time to run for the hills anyway. Thinking of paint thinner, lacquer thinner, paints, stains. :D :D
Travis
 

Noel

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This may be an indictment on my tool care....I've a wee Sip 2 Hp 25 ltr thing. Bought it 2nd hand a few years ago. Used to drain it on a regular basis and discharge it (using the cleaning gun). These days I only use it for maybe an hour or so per month. I leave it charged and now never run it down. Drain the tank about once or twice per year, leaving a little air in it to blow out any moisture. As for emptying the hose? Never. Works fine for me.
 

Chris Knight

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I drain my compressor once in a while when I remember but never blow it down - on the contrary, I keep it topped up.

There is logic to this :lol:

1. The enemy is corrosion.
2. Corrosion is worst at an air/water interface and on a partially wetted surface so for example at the puddle of water surface level in the cylinder and on the wet walls of the cylinder after draining
3. Blowing the unit down all the time simply increases the number of times new damp air has to be compressed and therefore the amount of water thus introduced into the cylinder. Draining it all the time simply ensures a lot of the cylinder is damp

If I were using the compressor a lot, as in a commercial operation, I would drain every day I expect, simply because so much water would be produced. As it is I rarely get more than a pint out of it.
 
A

Anonymous

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Well, I use an Axminster Extreme two most days, and have done for five years now. Hands up, I've only ever drained it a couple of times (laziness, time, it's tucked in an awkward corner etc etc) and last time getting on for a gallon came out, so I certainly ought to do it more often.

I'd go along with what Chris said, drain it occasionally but certainly don't blow it down. Just use it and don't worry about it - they seem to be very robust and reliable whatever you do with them.
 

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