• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Dado Saw

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

Osvaldd

Established Member
Joined
29 Sep 2018
Messages
449
Reaction score
0
Location
NI
I was wondering if there's a specific kind of saw for cutting the sides of long dado's. I remember a while ago watching some Japanese woodworking show where the guy had a small saw the size of a chisel. He'd clamp a piece of wood to use as a fence and cut the sides of dado's effortlessly in seconds. Any ideas?

Edit, found it: its called Japanese Azebiki Panel Saw. Are there any European saws like that?
 

Attachments

AndyT

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2007
Messages
12,027
Reaction score
495
Location
Bristol
Afaik, the only similar saws in the western tradition are both specialist and rare. There's a stair saw, used for cutting the sides of housings in stair strings (ie where the ends of the treads and risers go). Obsolete since the introduction of the powered router and probably more widespread in mainland Europe than the UK.

There's also a thin saw with a handle on one side, to run against a straight edge, but made for cutting veneer.

Neither of those will help you make a long housing. An ordinary tenon saw is fine, in my experience.

However, if you want to try the Japanese saw, they are easy enough to find. Derek Cohen has done some very impressive work with his.
 

Osvaldd

Established Member
Joined
29 Sep 2018
Messages
449
Reaction score
0
Location
NI
I’m not into oriental woodworking, if Europeans didn’t use something similar to Azebiki saw there must be a reason. I reckon I should master tenon saw technique first. I noticed the very first tooth of my tenon saw is very dull, rounded almost, I reckon this is interfering with the cutting.
 

marcros

Established Member
Joined
11 Feb 2011
Messages
11,274
Reaction score
717
Location
Leeds
have you tried to make a slight "wall" with a chisel when starting with the tenon saw? This helps to guide it.
 

Hornbeam

Established Member
Joined
21 Mar 2017
Messages
576
Reaction score
121
Location
Cheshire
You can do the same thing with a tenon saw by clamping a guide batten and then sawing up against it
Ian
 

Osvaldd

Established Member
Joined
29 Sep 2018
Messages
449
Reaction score
0
Location
NI
I just find it awkward and the saw doesn't cut well when not angled, it's especially difficult with stopped dados.
 

Trevanion

Greatest Of All Time
Joined
29 Jul 2018
Messages
3,764
Reaction score
555
Location
Pembrokeshire
Not 100% sure if it's what you're looking for but I imagine a good old floorboard saw is what you're after. The older ones tended to have a gentle curve along the whole length of the saw or a curved nose with teeth for crosscutting a board that's in situ on the floor.

Irwin still make one:


I personally would just chop out the dados (Trenches or Housings if you want to be proper English :wink:) with a chisel and mallet if I had only a few to do.
 

Trevanion

Greatest Of All Time
Joined
29 Jul 2018
Messages
3,764
Reaction score
555
Location
Pembrokeshire
I could do a whole paragraph about the technique but I really can't beat what Paul Sellers shows here:

[youtube]n3e6Ba6IfhM[/youtube]

Also, Richard Mcguire shows the same method here:

[youtube]vqnhG5d7vX4[/youtube]

I find Americans can over-complicate things, as well as trying to sell you things :lol:
 

Just4Fun

Established Member
Joined
21 Sep 2017
Messages
815
Reaction score
206
Location
Finland
I usually chisel them. I have tried using a saw. It does work and produces a good result but I find it more enjoyable and satisfying to use a chisel.

I have one of those Irwin floorboard saws but I rarely use it and have never used it on fine woodwork. To me it is, as its name suggests, for cutting up floorboards and similar rough tasks.
 
Top