Quantcast
  • We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Dado cutters..

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

A

Anonymous

Guest
I watch the New Yankee workshop avidly, and dream of having a workshop the size of Norm Abrams with similar tools.

One tool he uses with startling regularity is the Dado saw mounted in either his table saw, or radial arm saw.

Now I can't find one of these for love nor money in the UK, I've heard a rumour that they are illegal in Germany, but if thats the case, is that the situation here as well?

I guess once I get my router table built, it won't be such an issue as I can do similar cuts in that when it comes to cutting tenons and lap joints, but now I need to have my curiosity sated.

Regards

Paul.
 

johnelliott

Established Member
Joined
16 Apr 2003
Messages
1,105
Reaction score
0
Location
Near Swindon, Wiltshire
I'm virtually certain that no power saw that CAN be fitted with a dado blade would qualify for an 'E' mark, and as such could not be sold in the UK or anywhere else in the EU.
Americans are very fond of their dado blades but it seems like a daft idea to me. A half inch router can be bought for less than £100, and is far more versatile. For instance, stopped housings which are impossible using the saw/dado blade method
John
 

Newbie_Neil

Established Member
Joined
27 Jul 2003
Messages
6,537
Reaction score
0
Location
Nottingham, England
Hi Paul

I too was dazzled by Norm and his Dado cutters. I spent a lot of time trying to find a way to cut dadoes without buying a radial arm saw. The cuts that Norm makes with the dado cutter in his table saw cannot be made with the safety guards in place.

All new UK table saws must meet EU legislation and a dado cutter can only be physically attached to a few NEW tablesaws in the UK. Because of the European braking systems using dado cutters become a big safety issue and it is not recommended.

You can buy a radial arm saw to use with a dado cutter. Fitting the Freud dado set to the DeWalt RAS DW720 requires modifactions to the saw. (Courtesy of the Freud technical department)

A dado set will cost the best part of 100 pounds and I think the DeWalt set is nearer 200. For no more money, and probably a lot less, you can buy a cheap router and have it set up just to use in a jig to cut your dadoes.

If you type in "router dado jig" on Google you will get pages of jigs. They are basically very simple to make. There are two types of jigs, one which requires a guide fitted to the router and, my favourite, is the one that has the router tight between two pieces of hardwood. You must ALWAYS remember to use the same router and the same bit.

I didn't use exactly this jig but I found them on Google.

Look at this one to get an idea of how the jig works.

Now look at this one to make it.

The only difference is that I used a 6mm mdf base so that I lose very little in terms of depth of plunge. The first cut you make will take out the 1/2" width of your cutter from the mdf, from then on setting the width is very simple.

I think Jester started me off on this route. I had a quick look at her site but couldn't find anything about the jig.

Cheers
Neil

Edited 25/7/11 in the light of further information.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Cimares,

You can buy a dado cutter set, from Machine Mart, for around £80, I think.
As long as your table saw or RAS has a long enough shaft you can fit them, but it is as John has mentioned, TS's made now will not take them, and if fitted with a brake, they say you should not use them at all, with the large revolving mass stopping in a hurry!.
If your saw will take them, like everything else, they can be very useful, when used properly, I use mine regularly on my TS and RAS, great for ploughing out a lot of grooves and wide rebates.
Check you machine/s to see if you have a long enough shaft, as the dado set when used to maximum width is over 3/4" wide.
Hope this helps.
 

Newbie_Neil

Established Member
Joined
27 Jul 2003
Messages
6,537
Reaction score
0
Location
Nottingham, England
Hi Paul

I should make clear that I was referring to new saws bought today.

Woodtek is quite correct in saying that older table saws might well have the facility of adding a dado cutter.

Cheers
Neil
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Newbie_Neil":3rutbkqq said:
I think Jester started me off on this route. I had a quick look at her site but couldn't find anything about the jig.
Sorry Neil, I was going to put up a page on the site, but you know how these things slip down the "Tuit" list... :oops: There's this thread which has some details if that helps anyone.

Cheers, Jester
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Many thanks all for the replies.. My table saw is only about 6 months old so I imagine its not going to be suitable for the Dado head.

I've been using a router for dado's and stopped dado's but the key thing that Norm is always using them for is the fast cutting of tenons and half-lap joints.

I'll take a look at the jigs and see if I can develop an adjustable jig that lets me cut tenons and half-laps quickly too.

Cheers. Paul.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Cimares,

Having read your last posting, as you say your saw is only 6 months old, it will not take a dado set, which is a pity, as they can be very useful, as you noticed on the NYW. Yes I too like watching Norm, I know he's not everyone's cup of tea, but each to their own, I have learnt a lot for him, I have to say and his show is better than any UK show that I have seen!.
Right back to dado cutters and making tennons, as your saw will not take the cutters, it might take the 2 outside cutters, but no chippers, so its not worth spending £80 odd just for that. There is another way of cutting tennons on your saw with a very simple jig and as long as you have a decent fence and a good blade of 60 teeth, it works a treat. I have been using my jig that I thought up, today as I don't always want to set the dado set up and I can't fit the entire set any way.
I will put some photos up so you can see how I done it, it will be easier than trying to explain it. All you need is a few scrap bits of plywood a toggle clamp and a little time to make it, you can then cut tennons to your hearts content.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Cimares,

I have as promised put some photos up for the jig I made to make tennons, in the Gallery section under workshop jigs. The photos should show you how I did it, no doubt someone else has done something similar, but it works and you can cut equal tennons and off set ones as well.

To make the jig, you will see that it fits over the fence and as long as your fence is sturdy you will get straight tennons and that the fence is parallel with the blade. When making it to fit over the fence, make sure it is a snug fit with no side play, if its a bit tight, try putting some wax polish on it first before trying to ease it and then having it to loose.
As Norm says, make the shoulder cut first, then using the jig which must have an up right piece at the back, I am not sure if this shows in the photos. This will support the piece as you push it through the blade and it must be square with the table of the saw. When you have the piece of wood to be cut up against the support/stop, clamp it with the toggle clamp, this will make sure it will not move as you make the cut. If your fence has fine adjustment, this will make it easier to fine tune how much of the tennon is removed. When the first cut is done, turn the piece of wood around and make the second cut, if an equal tennon is required. Try the tennon in the mortice, if to tight, move the fence nearer the blade a fraction and use the jig to re-cut the tennon and then try it again in the mortice and so on. Once you have it just right, you can run all the wood through that you need and bobs your uncle. If anything is not quite clear let me know.
I have used this jig many times, making about 20 new kitchen cupboard doors and its worked a treat, but the tennons I cut were all off set, but it worked just the same. Just make sure you put a toggle or similar clamp on the jig, it will not only hold the wood to be cut OK, but also keep you fingers out the way of the blade. One final point, when pushing the jig to cut the tennon, make sure it is pushed up against the fence all the time and not allowed to move away, at the bottom of the fence at table height, as this will mess up the tennon and cut it undersize.
Hope this helps.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Many thanks woodtek, those pictures are nice and clear and a good example for me to work from.

I'll have a play next weekend and see how they work for me.
 

paultnl

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2011
Messages
356
Reaction score
0
Location
Ely, Cambridgeshire
I know this is an old thread but it came to the top of Google when searching for dado cutters UK. Although I understand the comments about the legality of using these, the Health and Safty page of greatbritishwoodshop would suggest that they
are wrong. Sorry I cant post a direct link.
 

9fingers

Established Member
Joined
26 Jul 2005
Messages
5,000
Reaction score
1
Location
Romsey, Hampshire
It is also incorrect to say that all saws sold in the UK will not take a dado blade.
There are several members here who have a modern table saw which is still available today which can take a dado blade.
And yes is comes to a halt in less than 10 seconds with a fully loaded 8" set. However, in order to avoid the wrath of the anti dado faction - I will not mention where to get one of these saws.

Bob
 

Karl

Established Member
Joined
2 Jul 2007
Messages
3,481
Reaction score
0
Location
Workshop
Or you could use a grooving cutter in place of a dado blade - safer as the sections of the cutter are "pinned" together



Cheers

Karl

(with the same brand of saw as Bob.....)
 

paultnl

Established Member
Joined
24 Jul 2011
Messages
356
Reaction score
0
Location
Ely, Cambridgeshire
9fingers":276q8hus said:
However, in order to avoid the wrath of the anti dado faction - I will not mention where to get one of these saws.

Bob
I don't need to worry about the saw, I got mine in the States and the manual even tells me how to fit them. What I am looking for is a source of a good dado set without breaking the bank.
 

Karl

Established Member
Joined
2 Jul 2007
Messages
3,481
Reaction score
0
Location
Workshop
I've got a set which is surplus (because i've got the cutter photo'd above) - i've sent you a PM.

Cheers

Karl
 

9fingers

Established Member
Joined
26 Jul 2005
Messages
5,000
Reaction score
1
Location
Romsey, Hampshire
Does that mean you need a 5/8" bore dado set?

Machine Mart part no 060620495 does not appear on their website at the moment
It is in my catalogue 2009/10 but may have been dropped. It is made by Freud so try their agents

http://woodfordwm.co.uk/ stock their own brand 8" set with either bore.

I can't link to the product but look under new semi pro machinery and then accessories under the table saw section. £50 plus vat

I have one of these set as well as a freud and am happy with both.

hth

Bob
 

Tusses

Established Member
Joined
21 May 2008
Messages
1,007
Reaction score
0
Location
coventry
I had my set from the states (maybe canada) of thier ebay site.

Shipping to here is cheap and fast compared to the UK !

For the record, the Wadkin AGS 10 will take Dado sets and cutter blocks.

IMHO they are nicer and quicker to use than noisy dusty routers ! :mrgreen:
 

brianhabby

Established Member
Joined
24 Sep 2006
Messages
1,957
Reaction score
2
Location
Colwyn Bay, North Wales
Always seems a hot topic, dado sets. I don't know about the law - I'm not a lawyer - but if a saw can be sold in the UK together with a dado set, then surely they cannot be illegal as some have indicated above, the firm would not be allowed to continue trading.

If anyone wants to know where to buy a saw that can take a dado set in the UK then look no further than the xcaliber saws under the semi-professional range at Woodford Woodworking Machines

regards

Brian
 

Latest posts

Top