• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Cutting sheet material for the first time....

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

wizer

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2005
Messages
15,589
Reaction score
0
ok, following on from the other thread. The sheet stock has been delivered and with storage being a problem I was going to attempt to get all the parts cut tomorrow and maybe even begin assembly.

I have never cut sheet material before and would like a bit of advice. I have a Circular Saw (B&D) and a cheapy Ferm TS. I bought the TS last year intending to make something, but it scared me and has sat in the box ever since! I also have a perform straight edge guide for the CS.

When designing the cabinet I used a piece of software called Optimik This has given me a cutting plan for the sheets. Designs as follows:



http://www.wizer.co.uk/conscab4.skp

I don't really know where to start. Do I just convert the cutlist onto the board using a pencil and square, then use the straight edge and CS to cut out each part? When marking out should I leave a gap for the thickness of the saw? Should I dare to use the TS? If so, how?

I know i'm asking some very basic questions but I'm worried about messing it up! :oops:

Also if anyone out there has sketchup and a little time to cast their beady eye over my plans i'd apprecieate any constructive comments.
 

johnelliott

Established Member
Joined
16 Apr 2003
Messages
1,105
Reaction score
0
Location
Near Swindon, Wiltshire
Normally with sheet materials one is looking for the best fit with your sheet material. That's a mighty big sheet you've got there. I think you need to start again and make sure that your enter your sheet size in correctly

As far as the design goes, anyway you could explode it a little, so that we can see the actual construction?

With something like this I would make it from several smaller boxes on adjustable feet, then fit them, adjust the feet so they all line up correctly, screw them together, then place a top across the whole lot. Prety much the same way as in a row of kitchen base units.

You can get adjustable feet, also clips which allow plinth board to be clipped to them, from woodfit

John
 

jasonB

Established Member
Joined
26 Nov 2004
Messages
5,044
Reaction score
1
Location
Surrey
If I have a lot of sizes to cut I usually sketch out a few rectangles on 5mm squared paper allowing 1 square to equal 100mm. This is easier than working straight on the boards.

I will then cut out the sheets to manageable sizes with my circ saw allowing a bit of waste all round then final cut on the table saw (allowing 3mm per saw cut)

In your case the common size on most items is 540mm so I would cut the sheet into 2No 1220x1100 then transfer to the table saw with the rip fence set to 540mm and rip all to 540mm wide then use the sliding carrage with length stop to cut the lengths all the same. What is the max width you can rip? 540mm may be beyond your saws capacity.


Jason
I notice your cut list makes no allowance for grain direction, is it all MDF?
 

jasonB

Established Member
Joined
26 Nov 2004
Messages
5,044
Reaction score
1
Location
Surrey
John looking at the pieces it will be made up from 3 boxes.


Wizer I would add a rail along the front top edge, say a strip 75mm wide laid horizontally. this will dive the tops of the doors something to shut against and also give you something to screw the top to

Jason
 

wizer

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2005
Messages
15,589
Reaction score
0
than;ks for the quick responses guys. Well spotted John, I got the sheet size wrong. I have updated the first post with the correct cutting plan.

Also here are some more pics of the cabinet from different angles and the top hidden.





If you have sketchup installed, the file is in the top post.

Jason: As I said before I am uneasy with the table saw. Whilst I kinda understand what you said, I only know this from watching Norm (who makes it look a doddle). When I got the Ferm TS out of its box (from screwfix) my first though was that it was exactly the same as my ceramic tile cutter! This is it here http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?id=19519&ts=39822#

With the CS should I make cuts to divide off the 2 'Big Back' parts away from 'Big Back' ? and similar 'rough' cuts to make the board sizes more manageable.

Is the TS easy to use? Should I risk it or would it be easier to use the straight edge clamp and CS.
 

wizer

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2005
Messages
15,589
Reaction score
0
PS: yes its all MDF (sprayed white hopefully) except the top wich is 1 sheet of birch ply with 1 sheet of white beech ply and 'bread board' edges.
 

Chris Knight

Established Member
Joined
14 Jan 2004
Messages
6,641
Reaction score
3
Location
SE London - NW Kent
Wizer,

As your TS is at present, it is quite unsuitable for cutting sheet material. You would need to build infeed/ outfeed and side extensions to handle even a modestly sized sheet. Trying to do it with your TS as it is, is asking for an accident.
 

wizer

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2005
Messages
15,589
Reaction score
0
thanks chris. As I thought. I have seen a norm episode where he makes a outfeed table for a TS my size, should have made it sooner! :(
 

jasonB

Established Member
Joined
26 Nov 2004
Messages
5,044
Reaction score
1
Location
Surrey
Wizer, it really a case of dividing the sheet with straight cuts.

8x4 Sheet
1st cut between big base & big back
2nd cut between big back & big doors
next cuts to give each component

10x4 sheet
1st cut to separate the six side pieces on the left from the rest of the board
2nd cut divide the 3 sides from the side/base & back
next divide these two pieces into 3 items each
and so on.

You may want to rip the first 10mm off the sides of the sheet if they are damaged.

Your saw is too small for handleing panels. The main restriction is the distance between the blade and the rip fence, this will govern the maximum width as the waste should be on the oposite side of the blade to the fence.

Spend a little time making sure the cir saw blade is at rightangles to the base of the saw and that it is sharp.

Lay the sheet onto some sacrificial battens at right angles to the cut so the board is supported as you cut it, have about 3mm of blade sticking out below the bottom off the MDF.

Jason
 

wizer

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2005
Messages
15,589
Reaction score
0
thanks Jason, all makes good sense. I'll lat you know how i get on! :D
 

frank

Established Member
Joined
10 Sep 2003
Messages
938
Reaction score
0
Location
cheshire
wizer dont forget to wear a good mask and stay upwind if you cut it outside . oh and dont forget the tap tap specs.
 

wizer

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2005
Messages
15,589
Reaction score
0
thanks frank. I recently cut some chipboard flooring using my CS. The first 2 cuts I didn't use a mask or glasses. I learnt that lesson quickly. My chest hurt almost instantly and dodging wood chips wasn't clever either. Also learned to wear ear protection as my ears were ringing!

ok Norm I get it now! :p
 

wizer

Established Member
Joined
3 Mar 2005
Messages
15,589
Reaction score
0
Well, I am gobsmacked!

Chris (waterhead37) VERY kindly offered to bring his festool saw round and help me cut the boards up. What can I say? THIS MAN IS A SAINT! It was great to work with such a pro and I can honestly say I have learned a lot today. The festool is a great bit of kit, the temptation to splash out is strong! I am amazed how quickly, effortlessly and neatly this saw cuts. All helped along by Chris's expert advice.

Unfortuneatly I had one board wrongly delivered and it was too small to fit 3 of the parts on. This was partly my fault for not checking, but partly Alsford's fault for either changing the order after I paid or not ordering what I asked for. Also the boards where very poor. The white beech veneered mdf had a massive dent in the side (luckily it was able to be on a scrap piece.) and the mdf was chipped and heavily scratched. I was not here when the wood was delivered and there lies the biggest lesson learned today.

Again, it was so kind of Chris to give up his time today and I am extermely grateful. My Missus summed it up when she said "It's like having Rick Stein round to help you cook dinner!"

I'm forever in your debt Chris! Thank You! :D
 

Alf

Established Member
Joined
22 Oct 2003
Messages
12,079
Reaction score
0
Location
Up the proverbial creek
WiZeR":38w6zsqs said:
Chris (waterhead37) VERY kindly offered to bring his festool saw round and help me cut the boards up. What can I say? THIS MAN IS A SAINT!
Hmm... Saint? Dunno about that. I think Rick there, sorry, I mean Chris, might be considered a bit of a rotter to corrupt you so. Bit like an introduction to handplanes with a Sauer and Steiner... (tell me you wouldn't, Chris :roll: ) :lol:

Cheers, Alf
 

Latest posts

Top