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Cutting Edge Woodworker

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ColG

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Has anybody been watching this new offering on H&L?

Paul Bradburn produces some nice pieces however, I find the filming soooooo infuriating. The camera seems to focus more on his face than what he's doing with his hands. I'm not saying there's anything wrong with his face, it's just that I'm more interested in what he's making.

Am I just a whinger or has anybody else noticed this?

Col
 

Noel

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Suppose we should be grateful for any WW offering on TV but I just do not find the programmes too captivating. There's something missing. Maybe not enough time spent on techniques, the more rudimentary methods of work. Perhaps the various projects are just too "whacky" for the average weekend warrior. Things like the Plasma Screen thing.......... I would've been more pleased and interested to see the guy build more run of the mill furniture. Even things like tables, chests of drawers etc. I persume the benchmark for most programmes of this nature is NYW and, frankly, I tend to learn more from it than Cutting Edge. It may improve....
Rgds

Noel
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi both

The interesting thing about this show is that SWMBO enjoyed it because of the design side. The show is obviously focusing on Paul Bradburn as he has a personality.

From a design perspective, he is producing some cutting edge pieces and he is also an accomplished woodworker.

The question to ask is what is his target market and this is where I have a problem.

The reason I and, I assume, others watch these shows is to learn more woodworking skills. This is not happening with CEW. He will quickly tell you what he is going to do and then show you just part of what he has done. I felt that the show should have been an hour long, in two half-hour slots, for each piece. If this was done the additional time could be spent on actually showing us what he is doing and giving us time to pick up any tips.

For me, the really interesting part has been to visit the timber yards. To make this show interesting he needs to introduce things that are different. Buying timber is probably the biggest single concern I have and so, personally, I would like to see more of this.

Love him or hate him, Norm is an exceptional presenter and he is the benchmark that they are judged against.

For me CEW has been far better than John's workshop and Smith and Sweetman.

Cheers
Neil
 

Gill

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At least Richard Blizzard explains and demonstrates techniques in his programmes :) 8) .

Yours

Gill (reaching for that well-used tin hat and diving into the bunker once again :) )
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Gill

Hope you are well. Now, please come out of your bunker and answer my question.

Forgive my ignorance, but who is Richard Blizzard?

Thanks
Neil
 

Noel

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Gill / Neil

Yes, Blizzard is a good presenter. Only problem I had with his show was the market it was aimed at - make a bird house for granny type of thing. It was good for what it was, just a bit too basic.
Of all the shows on H + L that I recall - NYW, Wood Works (Anton Fitzpatrick), Boyz in the Wood, John's Workshop, Cutting Edge, Designer Workshop etc only NYW (tops) and Wood Works seem to hit the mark. Oh, I forgot the Toolbox challenge nonsense.....
So, IMHO, for a decent UK WW series it's got to be Fitzpatrick running the Cutting Edge show.
Blizzard is more famous for his making and designing wooden toys (do a search on www.amazon.co.uk ). He had a few series on toys and basic WW on H + L channel.
Rgds

Noel
 
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Hi Folks
I agree about CEW, a bit gimmicky and personality based, more on the techniques and timber would be better appreciated.

As much as we may or may not like the designs etc its the 'how' rather than the 'what' which I feel most of us are interested in.

Wood works is a program I liked best and thou NYW has its obvious devotees I feel that ( and Ive said this before :lol: ) the gulf between his setup and most weekend warriors is wide enough to disqualify any real pratical use for most of us.
 

Noel

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Bill,

I'm borrowing Gills' hard hat and bunker here but I must disgree with you on your opinion that " the gulf between his setup and most weekend warriors is wide enough to disqualify any real pratical use for most of us."
What gulf?? Norm Abrams mainly uses the following things - drill press, tablesaw, bandsaw, router and router table, planer/thicknesser etc along with the usual collection of tailed and cordless tools. Granted wide belt sanders, powered keyhole cutters and the like are not common but I reckon everything else is available in most home workshops. The show is directly aimed at the weekend warrior. Sure our North American cousins tend to have a more comprehensive collection of machinery and tools but we're not too far behind.
As you mention technique is well presented on NYW along with the how and whys, something Cutting Edge lacks.
Lastly, you are spot on with Anton Fitzpatrick and Wood Works.

Rgds

Noel
 

sawdustalley

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Yeah, the stuff he built was very nice - really imaginative.

The explaining side was rubbish, the editing wasn't great, the images flicked about too much.
 

CYC

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Shouldn't we pass this tread on to H&L, I mean we are the frustrated ones desperate for some descent woodworking program instead of the ever growing programs about fishing! (shivering...)

By the way, any of you applied to the presenter gig they had a few months ago?
 
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Anonymous

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I'm glad to read that I'm not the only one who feels the show is more personality than technique. I agree with most of you that NYW is probably the benchmark by which we all judge new offerings.

I was very tempted when H&L were touting for new presenters to do a video on use of specific aspects of woodworking such as "how to use a router" or "a trip to the timber yard" etc. but alas, I never got round to it. Maybe H&L could by the catalogue of WW videos from the Axminster catalogue and pay the broadcasting fees - I'm sure it would make a good series.
 
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Hi Noel

My point is not neccesarily the type of tool he uses though over time he has used just about every tool I have ever seen, but their quality and also the fantastic space he has for his workshop. Most of us do with the garage if we are lucky.

How much do you think his table saw with all its 'bits' would cost? I wager that adding the cost of all my tools I would not be able to purchase one Norm saw.

Now we all know that much can be achieved with few tools but generally, when it comes to power tools, if you buy cheap you get cheap. If we all had norms setup I am sure we could ( well at least me anyways) appreciate his output.

To be able to achieve his results and quality of finish with the ease he presents one would also need access to similar aids. This just ain't gonna be so for most of us.
Therefore , although I occasionaly enjoy norms offerings I don't let them go to my head. Its just a fantasy world.

Edit: Incidently, if I did possess Norms table saw, I doubt it would fit into my workspace :lol:
 

Noel

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Hi Bill,

Gotta continue to disagree with you. In practical and usage terms there is very little difference between NYW tools and your tools or mine. Assuming you have the basics (tablesaw or bandsaw, router,decent cllection of handtools, sander etc) there is very little that you can't build that you see being built on the show. He may have a warehouse of a workshop but for filming purposes anything less wouldn't be much use. Sure he's got most tools known to man but if I had a show underwritten by Delta / Porter Cable I would want everything. The guy is a power tool junkie, not a real problem in my opinion.
I guess what I'm trying to say is that one should look beyond all the glitz of 3HP Unisaws and a router for every profile of bit. It's the inspiration, the techniques and the methodolgy that are important.
Not sure what you mean by your ref to cheap tools and the various aids that are used in the show.
Just my 2p worth.

Rgds

Noel


Noel
 

frank

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at least with norm you can make what he makes , but the other bloke well i just went and played a game on the putter thats how interesting he was :(
 
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Anonymous

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Gotta continue to disagree with you. In practical and usage terms there is very little difference between NYW tools and your tools or mine.
Noel, I couldn't disagree more. I guess we will have to agree maybe to disagree :)

I don't think in fact most of us has a full complement of tools or in deed the space to be able to fully use them if we did.

For instance, I would have no room for norms table saw, ( if I had one I'd have no space for anything else) my bandsaw is not really up to anything major like resawing. It goes on.

I'm not carping, I am just trying to illustrate the differences.

Having the best tools and the environment and space to fully utilise them, and access to the finest timber would make a huge difference to my output both in quality and quantity including the pleasure of producing same.

To say different is foolish IMO.

Sure there is some merit in being able to construct or create an item with meagre resource. ( Perhaps that is a British disease btw, making do, accepting less etc :lol: )

I don't deny that with the basic equipment one can produce work, its just that with a Norm setup so much more is possible.

NYW is pie in the sky to me whereas a program like 'Woodworks' is much more realistic.

Its not that I don't like to dream its just that I know the difference.
 

gidon

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bilzee, noely

There is living proof that what Norm makes you and I can make - he sells the plans and videos and people make the exact same things as him. Look at the website. They may take a little longer than he does and use different tools but you have to use your imagination a bit. The fact he has a bigger workshop and bigger machines doesn't in my mind mean that we can't make what he makes. Look at someone like Ron Fox - he has a minute workshop and does all sorts from there.

These shows should in my opinion be inspirational. NYW definitely is, CEW is not bad actually. The other shows don't inspire me personally. I'm not sure who Woodworks is aimed at but he makes a point of making out everything is very easy and can be all be done with some basic tools and a good attitude. But you don't really see him dimension all his wood etc which is what you see on CEW and why people think he has so much kit. Same with NYW. You could of course buy all your wood already dimensioned. None of this is to say I wouldn't love a larger workshop!

I hope they keep these w/w'ing progs coming.

Cheers

Gidon
 

Noel

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Bilzee,
OK, can't see us agreeing on this issue, so let's get back to making sawdust.....

Rgds

Noel
 
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Anonymous

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Making sawdust..........

Far too busy watching all these w/w programs on H&L :lol:
 

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