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Cutting aluminium t-track

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The Bear

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Hi

Whats the best way to cut this and clean up the cut afterwards? (Have most things but not a bandsaw at the moment)

I intend to route a stopped channel in a board with a laminate top and fix it into that giving a flush top. The router is going to produce a rounded end to the stopped channel. Ideally I’d like the track to fit nice and tight up to the end, so which is best, round the track end or square off the channel in the laminate (how to do this without cracking/damaging the laminate?). Any practical suggestions welcomed.

Cheers

Mark
 

Benchwayze

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If you really can't master a file (and some can't) then a disc sander should clean-up and round the end of the T section. But you have to have a disc sander. Ok, so you might ruin a disc...

But as Rob says, the best way is a hacksaw and files. And if you don't try, you won't learn. :wink:

John :)
 

Benchwayze

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woodstainwilly":1vlz6j21 said:
I would say junior hacksaw, it has finer teeth so less filing to do.
Willy.
A rose by any other name.... :lol: :lol: :lol:

And only if a JH cuts on a curve Willy! :mrgreen:

John :wink:
 

9fingers

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Find a washer of the same diameter as the track is wide. Scribe a curved line on the back of the track. Hacksaw just to the waste side of the line. File neatly to the line.
Job's a good 'un.


Bob
 

Benchwayze

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It's the 'neat filing' I have trouble with Bob! :mrgreen:

Someone once told me to round off corners by moving the file in the opposite arc. Dunno if that's correct, but it works for me.... Most of the time.

John :D
 

TheTiddles

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hacksaw and disk sander, personally I'd square the channel off.

One thing to remember, if you block both ends of the channel you'll need to leave the nuts in the track before you insert it and they can't come out again

Aidan
 

Dee J

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I find an 'Evolution Rage' blade in a suitable sliding mitre saw the most astonishing device for cutting all kinds of materials - including aluminium. (think the've upped the superlative to 'Fury' now). Cuts clean, square and quickly.
Just remember to use the right PPE! Shards of hot metal make for unpleasant swarf.
The whole machine can be bought for about £100 and ours has withstood a lot of abuse from Aluminium to steel to nail-infested firewood - and still cuts wood remarkably well.

Dee
 

Benchwayze

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Dee J":11tb73rm said:
I find an 'Evolution Rage' blade in a suitable sliding mitre saw the most astonishing device for cutting all kinds of materials - including aluminium. (think the've upped the superlative to 'Fury' now). Cuts clean, square and quickly.
Just remember to use the right PPE! Shards of hot metal make for unpleasant swarf.
The whole machine can be bought for about £100 and ours has withstood a lot of abuse from Aluminium to steel to nail-infested firewood - and still cuts wood remarkably well.

Dee
So Dee;

Good idea if a lot of metalwork is done. So, could I buy a metal cutting blade for my SCMS? Or a grinding disc maybe?
I suppose that would be less expensive, but as I have a hacksaw hanging on a cup hook, and a file in the 'metalwork' drawer, can I justify the cost? Just to make a trolley for my Planer/Thicknesser.

Edit... Oh I see I didn't read your post properly. A blade replacement is precisely what you did. I thought you were talking about a specially made saw, for metal cutting. :mrgreen: Sorry and all that!!! :oops:

Come to think of it, can we buy metal cutting blades for the picture framers' hand-mitre saws? These are only a few quid, and for a small one-off job, might be worth the cost, as they can also be used to cut wood.

John :mrgreen:
 

9fingers

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A couple of simple mild steel strips bolted to the ends of a 10" hacksaw blade could possibly fit your hand mitre saw but to be honest a free hand hacksaw is possibly the easiest way to cut steel angle.
Simply mark the line and cut to it - just the same as woodworking really.

Bob
 

Benchwayze

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Hi Bob,

I recall way back in 1973 hack-sawing 6 inches off a 4.5 inch Rolled Steel 'I' beam. The builder who was demolishing my interior wall, reckoned I'd never do it. Of course, it wasn't exactly a five minute job, but I did it, and the cut was square too.

However, I had considerably more stamina than I have now! :mrgreen:

Now, the material I am using for my planer trolley is 1" square tube, wall thickness about 3/32". Cutting through tubes always throws me somehow! :(

John :D
 

marcros

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Benchwayze":dxhamyd6 said:
Hi Bob,

I recall way back in 1973 hack-sawing 6 inches off a 4.5 inch Rolled Steel 'I' beam. The builder who was demolishing my interior wall, reckoned I'd never do it. Of course, it wasn't exactly a five minute job, but I did it, and the cut was square too.

However, I had considerably more stamina than I have now! :mrgreen:

Now, the material I am using for my planer trolley is 1" square tube, wall thickness about 3/16". Cutting through tubes always throws me somehow! :(

John :D
What about a cutting disk for the angle grinder?
 

Benchwayze

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Hi Marcos.

I think at the time, the only portable power tool I had was a Stanley-Bridges Drill. Attachments for that, although varied, didn't extend to very much outside of woodworking!

I look at my workshop now, and I think... 'I got it good!' I still don't get much done though!

John :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

marcros

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sorry John, i meant the tubing for the planer trolley
 

Benchwayze

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marcros":1trtbw30 said:
sorry John, i meant the tubing for the planer trolley
Hi Marcos. NP.

I'll probably have a go by hand.
By the time I have reduced one tube to 1" lengths with successive attempts, I'll just about have mastered the hacksaw! :D :D :D

Thanks my friend

John :)
 

Benchwayze

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I just checked the manual for my SCMS. It doesn't say anything at all about metal cutting, metal cutting blades, or their fitting. So:

It ain't gonna happen! 8)

John :)
 

Rob Platt

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Benchwayze said:
I just checked the manual for my SCMS. It doesn't say anything at all about metal cutting, metal cutting blades, or their fitting. So:


There not designed for metal cutting. one reason is frequently the motor is too fast for a metal cutting disc having seen the scar from 72 stiches in one guys face when he used the wrong blade my advice is never to put a metal cutting blade in anything but a saw that was designed for it.
all the best
rob
 

Benchwayze

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Rob Platt":3qurwj8a said:
Benchwayze":3qurwj8a said:
I just checked the manual for my SCMS. It doesn't say anything at all about metal cutting, metal cutting blades, or their fitting. So:


There not designed for metal cutting. one reason is frequently the motor is too fast for a metal cutting disc having seen the scar from 72 stiches in one guys face when he used the wrong blade my advice is never to put a metal cutting blade in anything but a saw that was designed for it.
all the best
rob
As I said Rob... It ain't gonna happen; The reason I checked the manual! I'll use a hacksaw!

Thanks ...
John :D
 

The Bear

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Thanks for the answers. I am more than happy to have a go, but better to ask first than after the first cock up.

So if I take the other route, what is the best way to square the channel. It is mdf with about 1mm of laminate bonded to the top. The router cuts it fine, but I am wary how to square up the end once routed. Would be easy without the laminate.


Mark
 
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