Cut off sharp end of pushpin

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Gogsi

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Hi there I'd like to cut about 6mm off a pushpin.
Would a regular pair of pliers do the job or would I need something more substantial or exotic?
Your help is much appreciated.
 

MARK.B.

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Give it a try and you will have your answer.
No reason why a decent set of pliers would not do the job,just mind your eyes when the little bit pings off at a 100mph
 

AES

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Not trying to nitpick, but what do you mean by a pushpin? Maybe it's just me, but a pushpin is a spring-loaded tool used to push headless/almost headless pins into wood. Mine is 2 telescoping brass tubes with a magnetic "chuck" inside. I don't think you mean cutting that do you?

If you mean cutting 6 mm off the length of a "steel" headless/almost headless "nail" I would say provided it's not more that about 1 to 1.5 mm dia, and provided it's normal mild steel (not hardened like those pins used for hammering into walls to hang pictures, etc, which normally look a bit blue in colour), and provided your side cutting pliers are in good shape then they should cut off the length of such an "ordinary" pin fine.

Try it a bit gently and if you feel a great resistance as you increase pressure (and/or if the pin is blue) then don't use your side cutters. Ideal then would be a thin cutoff disk in something like a Dremel drill running at pretty high rpm. If you don't have such a tool then an ordinary drill (battery or mains) will be fine, but due to much lower rpm will take longer.

If the worst comes to the worst you could use a hack saw (32 TPI blade) but even that will struggle on really hard (blue pins), and it you've got a lot to do, hack sawing will get pretty boring pretty fast!

As said above, if using side cutters then expect the bit you cut of to ping away somewhere where you can't fund it (or straight into your eye - so safety glasses).

You CAN buy cutters (plier-type) with specially hardened jaws but they're expensive and even with those you will struggle if your pins are hardened (blue).
 

TRITON

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a pushpin is a spring-loaded tool used to push headless/almost headless pins into wood.
Ditto, though its two words not one. Push Pin, though google doesnt recognize it and as per tries to show you pics of wall/noteboard push pins in order to sell you them. Good old predictable google.

As above also, a dremel and cut off wheel., rather than pliers.

One trick for really difficult cuts, is to place the pliers on the ground, put the pin in it then hit the handle with a hammer. Best wearing safety goggles and maybe cover yourself with a blanket as the cut off bit is going to reach mach 5
 

disco_monkey79

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I recently used side cutters to cut off security tags from some clothes (that I HAD paid for at a self-service till - I simply didn't notice the tags 'til I got home. No alarm when I left the shop either).

To my surprise, they cut the (stainless steel? Chrome?) pins with little difficulty - I had expected it to be merely an opening gambit in a more protracted battle... However, as stated by others, the offcut was last seen heading in to orbit, so PLEASE be careful of your eyes
 

Rorschach

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Not trying to nitpick, but what do you mean by a pushpin? Maybe it's just me, but a pushpin is a spring-loaded tool used to push headless/almost headless pins into wood. Mine is 2 telescoping brass tubes with a magnetic "chuck" inside. I don't think you mean cutting that do you?

I have always known that as a ram pin. I think it might even be stamped on mine.
 

AES

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Interesting Rorschach. Mine is definitely call a Push Pin (and it's two words as Triton pointed out above). I wonder if the name is a regional thing?

But even more interesting, I've never ever heard the "nail" that you push in with a Push/Ram Pin called a pushpin, have you? (And I'm NOT taking the mickey Gogsi, 'onest).
 

Rorschach

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Interesting Rorschach. Mine is definitely call a Push Pin (and it's two words as Triton pointed out above). I wonder if the name is a regional thing?

But even more interesting, I've never ever heard the "nail" that you push in with a Push/Ram Pin called a pushpin, have you? (And I'm NOT taking the mickey Gogsi, 'onest).

I've always called the nails panel pins, very rarely use them these days.

I did a google search for Ram Pin and most results show it called Ram Pin, Rampin or Push Pin. All are exactly the same tool so it could be regional as you say or it just has more than one name.
 

Rorschach

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Yup, me too. (But never heard the name Ram Pin - for the tool).

BTW, who are you "borrowing time" from? I could definitely do with some!

Oh I was expecting an imminent ban. I could probably change that as my ban seems a little further away now! lol
 

skeetstar

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Here at no 23, its always been a Pin Push. Inherited from my father, old as the hills, and I assumed a tool that no one ever uses now. From this thread it seems they are more common than I thought, and that people actually use them.
 

toolsntat

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Been a lot of makers, numerous names and different sizes but all doing the same job.
Hold a panel pin, often with magnetism and allow you to push it in and set it under the surface without a hammer.
I've never considered it before but maybe the designer of this tool would have specified hardening the plunger for durability?
If this is the case you may need to gently grind it back.
May we please ask as to why you need to do this Gogsi?
Cheers Andy
 
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toolsntat

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Then again we may have the wrong end of the stick and Gogsi is on about a hardened "Nail set punch" that you hit with a hammer, in which case gentle grinding back should suffice.
This obviously means that the small indentation, which aids keeping the punch in position on the pin/nail head while hammering is lost.
Cheers Andy
 
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