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Cut Depth Of Table Saw...

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Paul alan

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How important is it? If I was to buy a saw with only 65-70mm depth (Dewalt Compact 210mm) would I regret that at some instances?

What kind of situation would that hinder me on, having less cutting depth?

Many thanks

Paul
 

mynamehere

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If your work would never need any deeper cuts than 65-70mm then it wouldn't hinder you, if it did, it would.
 

Paul alan

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I think you may be right there, thanks for working that out for me ;)

It's hard to predict what I might need more cut depth for, I'm just asking for those more experienced than me who may have possibly done the same thing and might have some wisdom to share.
 

marcros

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it depends a bit...

For furniture, I dont think that you would find 60-70mm restrictive. Boards that are thicker than a couple of inches are harder to get anyway, you would need to search them out. Even for a hefty dining table wouldn't need to go above that. If you did need to cut something deeper, then you always have the option of a handsaw, particularly for cross cutting. If you do a lot, I would be looking at a track saw or circular saw to supplement the table saw rather than struggling with hefting massive boards to a saw. Bigger depths of cut mean bigger lumps of wood so need larger tops.

do you have a bandsaw? The only significant time that I would cut deeper than 60mm would be if I have a 50mm x 200mm board and want to split it into 2 x 25mm thick ones (this isnt a discussion on whether that is a good idea from a movement point of view). Again, you could use a handsaw which is a workout but is an option.

If you have a barn and no shortage of space, I would consider the deepest cut and the biggest saw that you can get with a nice large top and a sliding table. If you are working in a garage I would stick with the 65mm.

table saws are space hungry, have you considered not having one? This will depend on what you are making, but there may be alternatives.
 

mynamehere

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Everything depends on what you're making and the maximum stock size you're using.
In general a larger capacity is "better" as in less limits, you can cut small stuff on a big saw but not the other way around.
If you are cutting angles on a table saw you also reduce the maximum thickness of the wood.
65-70mm covers a lot of ground though...

Cheers!

Ferenc
 

artie

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I'm just asking for those more experienced than me who may have possibly done the same thing and might have some wisdom to share.
I don't know about wisdom, but I have always reckoned the minimum size for a table saw, for me is 10 inch blade and wide enough to rip a 8 by 4 sheet long wise .

There have been a few times I needed more but it was so seldom I could work around it.
 

RobinBHM

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What do you intend cutting?

Bear in mind ripping timber requires a lot of power, you will need to be gentle with cutting anything thick, esp in hardwood.

I used to have a panel saw with a 3 phase 5hp motor, that didn't like cutting 3" oak.

If you are using this for fine cabinetmaking type projects, you are best buying a saw for its build quality and accuracy than blade size. I've seen good reviews for the desalts so I'd say it's a good buy.
 

Paul alan

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it depends a bit...

For furniture, I dont think that you would find 60-70mm restrictive. Boards that are thicker than a couple of inches are harder to get anyway, you would need to search them out. Even for a hefty dining table wouldn't need to go above that. If you did need to cut something deeper, then you always have the option of a handsaw, particularly for cross cutting. If you do a lot, I would be looking at a track saw or circular saw to supplement the table saw rather than struggling with hefting massive boards to a saw. Bigger depths of cut mean bigger lumps of wood so need larger tops.

do you have a bandsaw? The only significant time that I would cut deeper than 60mm would be if I have a 50mm x 200mm board and want to split it into 2 x 25mm thick ones (this isnt a discussion on whether that is a good idea from a movement point of view). Again, you could use a handsaw which is a workout but is an option.

If you have a barn and no shortage of space, I would consider the deepest cut and the biggest saw that you can get with a nice large top and a sliding table. If you are working in a garage I would stick with the 65mm.

table saws are space hungry, have you considered not having one? This will depend on what you are making, but there may be alternatives.
I have handsaws and enjoy using them.
I will get a bandsaw, probably around Xmas time.
I now have track saw left over from my table saw build which I’ve taken apart.
The tracks aren’t much good but works well on sheets with a straight (ish) edge.
I don’t think I would enjoy my hobby as much without a decent (ish) table saw though. I day dream about them often!
 
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Trevanion

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I think trying to rip anything more than 35mm hardwood on one of those Dewalt saws would be quite tasking for the machine anyway.

A bandsaw is a better choice for rough ripping timber, in my opinion.
 

mynamehere

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If your laptop stand is the kind of work you're doing then capacity wise the Dewalt will do just fine, I have one myself and haven't needed a bigger one yet, with a sensible feed rate it will cut hardwood at maximum depth.
If I would have to decide again I would go for a secondhand cabinet saw though, I do like the old cast iron stuff!

Cheers!

Ferenc
 

Paul alan

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I'm not sure which direction my woodworking will evolve to, all I know is I'm never going to stop and would absolutely love to do it full time.

My next project is a table saw workbench of around 3ft x 6ft with a built-in router. Then we need a built-in wardrobe making.

After that its back to building the workshop out, I'm really looking forward to making shelving and cupboard doors etc. So I can practice all the different joinery techniques and have somewhere amazing to go to for future "making" for me its the realization of a dream (or part of it)
 

Paul alan

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it depends a bit...

For furniture, I dont think that you would find 60-70mm restrictive. Boards that are thicker than a couple of inches are harder to get anyway, you would need to search them out. Even for a hefty dining table wouldn't need to go above that. If you did need to cut something deeper, then you always have the option of a handsaw, particularly for cross cutting. If you do a lot, I would be looking at a track saw or circular saw to supplement the table saw rather than struggling with hefting massive boards to a saw. Bigger depths of cut mean bigger lumps of wood so need larger tops.

do you have a bandsaw? The only significant time that I would cut deeper than 60mm would be if I have a 50mm x 200mm board and want to split it into 2 x 25mm thick ones (this isnt a discussion on whether that is a good idea from a movement point of view). Again, you could use a handsaw which is a workout but is an option.

If you have a barn and no shortage of space, I would consider the deepest cut and the biggest saw that you can get with a nice large top and a sliding table. If you are working in a garage I would stick with the 65mm.

table saws are space hungry, have you considered not having one? This will depend on what you are making, but there may be alternatives.
In the past using my homemade table saw I have simply cut halfway through a piece then flipped it over and cut the other half, I have to admit though it did make me "twitch" a little.
 

Paul alan

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How much cutting do you do with the blade tilted? That 60mm becomes about 40mm at 45º.

Pete
I actually have never done any bevel cuts with the table saw, the one I made only did perpendicular cuts as it was supposed to be a track saw and I couldn't bevel it the way I had it set up.

I do want to do some bevel cutting for my workshop door to make some raised panels.

I think I've more or less decided on a bosch with around 80mm of cut depth, seems to the average standard kind of depth.
 

Paul alan

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If your laptop stand is the kind of work you're doing then capacity wise the Dewalt will do just fine, I have one myself and haven't needed a bigger one yet, with a sensible feed rate it will cut hardwood at maximum depth.
If I would have to decide again I would go for a secondhand cabinet saw though, I do like the old cast iron stuff!

Cheers!

Ferenc
Yeah, they look cracking them cabinet saws, and I only hear good things about them. Probably a bit heavy for my shop though.
 

Eshmiel

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If you ever want to make a large bed with 4 inch square posts, a full size external door and frame or a variety of other larger items, the ability to cut 3 - 4 " is useful. However, a smaller saw can still achieve cross cuts in thicker stock if you can flip the workpiece over and cut from both sides with accuracy. (Harder than you might imagine to avoid the 1mm ledge where the cuts meet). You need to strap it down and be very careful, as the guard comes off ....

You can do the same ripping (cut halfway through from both sides, that is) but it isn't the best way to resaw. As T says, a bandsaw is the proper machine for larger timber slicing. Otherwise, the vast table saw is needed, with a 12" / 310mm diameter blade. Expensive!

Eshmiel
 

Cabinetman

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My saw is a Sedgwick 315,( 12”) and it’s surprising how often it isn’t big enough. So really get the biggest you can afford that will fit in your workshop, an older cast-iron saw will last a lifetime and will probably be cheaper than a brand-new relatively lightweight saw There are plenty of places that recondition them. It has never stopped me, there is always another way of doing things, that’s what we’re good at isn’t it, - ingenuity.
 

pe2dave

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I've a similar Makita. Never wanted more than it can give - but... turn over the wood, run through again and it increases?
Maybe more cleaning up but planing is good for you.
 
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