Cup ring on newly applied Osmo finished oak worktop

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Simon89

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Hi All,

I have recently finished an oak worktop with Osmo Polyx oil

After only a few days I have marked the worktop with cups / mugs leaving behind some clear rings

I have tried to lightly sand the area and re-apply oil but with no joy, the rings just show up again.

Unfortunately the area affected is between a stove and a sink so difficult to re-sand.

I am wondering if I just need to sand it back further or if there is some magic trick to fix?

Thanks

Simon
 

julianf

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If it's between the stove and the sink, just wait a while, and you won't be able to see it any more.
 

DBT85

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When you say clear rings what do you mean? White ish marks?

I've had osmo on my oal tops for 5 years and the only issues I've had are when some water gets left on it for a prolonged period it goes a bit white and as soon as its properly dried it vanishes. Also there is one oven cleaner we had that had something in it that left a black stain.
 

Simon89

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Thanks, sanded it back a little further and reapplied the Osmo, hopefully that will have fixed it (if it doesn’t just go with time anyway)
 

Ttrees

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I don't have any experience with finishes, nor repairs and the likes, so take with a pinch of salt,
but think I've heard of folks using naphtha or lighter fluid for getting the moisture out of some finishes, but not sure which it works on.
Hopefully someone who knows about this can advise.

Tom
 

Terry - Somerset

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This started me wondering what the most most foolish materials are in a kitchen where (IMHO) a balance needs to be struck favouring functional performance over apperance.

Typical work kitchen surfaces:
  • granite - resistant to pretty much everything, minor scratches over time
  • marble - somewhat softer but reacts with the acidic
  • glazed ceramics - highly resistant but vulnerable to impacts and grouting
  • resins and veneers - designed to be fairly resistant to most things (allegedly)
  • laminate - traditional and generally long lasting
  • metal - zinc and copper soft
  • wood - vulnerable to almost everything - heat, impacts, water, moisture, temperature, expansion and contraction, high maintenance
Even as folk who appreciate wood and its qualities (grain, colouring, appearance, texture etc) must realise that beautifully finished wood and a kitchen environment do not make happy bedfellows!
 

DBT85

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Other issues with the first 3 are they they are cold, the laminates are fine but can't be refinished.

The only real issue most have with wooden tops is that they let them sit in water around the sink. We aren't even particularly careful but we don't let it bath in water and we've honestly had no issues other than I've mentioned above. And it can always be sanded back and re finished unlike the majority of others.

Its been 5 years now and I've not applied any finish to them since the days before I installed, except on one patch to fix that issue I had. of the 9m worth of oak in the kitchen 3 didn;t even get a final coat and you can see its not nice and even like everywhere else, but its still stood up to what's been thrown at it, albeit it is the less used for wet/messy stuff end of the kitchen. I need to do the whole lot again and now that the kid is old enough to be at school it might even happen.
 

Droogs

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If you cook then having cold tops is a must for baking, pasta making etc from fresh ingredients.
 

DBT85

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If you cook then having cold tops is a must for baking, pasta making etc from fresh ingredients.
I guess that depends what you are doing and how. I cook and bake on wooden tops just fine. But then I also don't make my own pasta or pizza bases.
 

Droogs

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I have to, not allowed to eat ready made from tins & packets. They have too much of the things that make me sick, not even allowed fruit juice as it raise my iron absorption by up to 300%
 

Rustic Mike

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When you say clear rings what do you mean? White ish marks?

I've had osmo on my oal tops for 5 years and the only issues I've had are when some water gets left on it for a prolonged period it goes a bit white and as soon as its properly dried it vanishes. Also there is one oven cleaner we had that had something in it that left a black stain.
I used Oxcalic acid to get rid of the black stain make into a paste and apply I did it when I was going to bed, and left it on overnight, it might need a couple of applications but it did get rid of mine make sure you put the water proofing on from osmo then use the top coat, if you what the paint numbers let me know as I’m on a roof just now and haven’t got them to hand just my cup of tea and a bacon butty is all I have at the moment, Mmm.
 

Rustic Mike

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I used Oxcalic acid to get rid of the black stain make into a paste and apply I did it when I was going to bed, and left it on overnight, it might need a couple of applications but it did get rid of mine make sure you put the water proofing on from osmo then use the top coat, if you what the paint numbers let me know as I’m on a roof just now and haven’t got them to hand just my cup of tea and a bacon butty is all I have at the moment, Mmm.
Oh oxcaic acid is made from dried rhubarb leaves
 

Droogs

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How rude of me, I forgot to type the answer to the OP :oops:.
If the marks are light grey to white and there is no synthetic finish on the piece just oil or wax then gentle application of you heat gun over 5 mins will slowly get rid of it. If the marks were dark bluey black or black then the oxalic accid would gradually lighten them. The white marks are trapped water under the surface of the finish, the dark ones are a reaction of the tanin in oak reacticng to ferrite based material such as nails and you plane iron in the presence of moisture as the catalyst.

hth
 

DBT85

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I used Oxcalic acid to get rid of the black stain make into a paste and apply I did it when I was going to bed, and left it on overnight, it might need a couple of applications but it did get rid of mine make sure you put the water proofing on from osmo then use the top coat, if you what the paint numbers let me know as I’m on a roof just now and haven’t got them to hand just my cup of tea and a bacon butty is all I have at the moment, Mmm.
Thanks Mike that's great info. When you say make into a paste what do you mean? I assume that's just to keep it in one place and not drip all over the kitchen?

At some point I need to ignore the manufacturer instructions and sink our hob into the worktop. Too much crud gets under the edge currently.
 

Rustic Mike

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Thanks Mike that's great info. When you say make into a paste what do you mean? I assume that's just to keep it in one place and not drip all over the kitchen?

At some point I need to ignore the manufacturer instructions and sink our hob into the worktop. Too much crud gets under the edge currently.
That’s right you can dry it with an hairdryer to speed up the process clean it if and repeat and give it a rub with some fine sand paper in between applications, I had to do it quite a few times when you are satisfied and have sande it I give it a squirt of isopropyl and that will show you how it will look when you apply the sealer and it dries very quick hit it with the hair dryer it’s a bit of messing around but you will get there in the end, don’t forget to water proof it before the finish coat goes on
 

plum60

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Hi All,

I have recently finished an oak worktop with Osmo Polyx oil

After only a few days I have marked the worktop with cups / mugs leaving behind some clear rings

I have tried to lightly sand the area and re-apply oil but with no joy, the rings just show up again.

Unfortunately the area affected is between a stove and a sink so difficult to re-sand.

I am wondering if I just need to sand it back further or if there is some magic trick to fix?

Thanks

Simon
Hi When water gets under any coating on wood and cannot get back out it shows as a white mark. You have to get it out before re-coating or polishing otherwise you will trap it in even more.
Try rubbing meths with a soft cloth over the mark and it might start to fade away. If water got further down into the wood it takes longer to evaporate out so rub it and leave it etc. If it won't evaporate away we rub meths over the spot and then set it alight it. You have to stop it burning quite quickly so blow any low flame out because it will suck out the water when it burns but if you let it burn for a second or two too long you will have scold mark which is permanent. Always try to buy better wood coating products from Morrells for instance so no water can get in in the first place.
 
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