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Phil Pascoe

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I noticed while fitting a new wheel to my grinder that the switch housing and the cable inlet are identical and diametrically opposed, and also that the wheel shrouds have two different mounting points : I assume this is so that they can effectively be altered to run backwards. Has anyone done this? Is it worthwhile? I would think for turning tools it could be an advantage.
 

xy mosian

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phil.p":3hh9k67v said:
I noticed while fitting a new wheel to my grinder that the switch housing and the cable inlet are identical and diametrically opposed, and also that the wheel shrouds have two different mounting points : I assume this is so that they can effectively be altered to run backwards. Has anyone done this? Is it worthwhile? I would think for turning tools it could be an advantage.
Hi Phil,
Not on a creusen, but at £15 B+Q jobby, about 15 or so years ago. On the grinder the plinth which held the switch etc. could be removed and turned around. The guides were removed and mounted on opposite ends. My use was to mimic a grinder with diamond encrusted wheel, pink, on one end and buffing wheel on the other. The original was from a well known tool manufacturer, who I forget of course. Forunately the diamond wheel was manufactured not far from me and a visit got me a freeby, ray!!.
All in all I found the conversion worthwhile. Obviously for the trailing buffing but also for the trailing grind on a 'soft' wheel.
HTH xy.
 

Phil Pascoe

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I haven't a buffing wheel, just a 40mm white and 20mm pink wheels - the pink especially is soft. (I have another three grinders for different things :D )
 

xy mosian

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Well I'm sure I don't need to mention it , but one slip with a tool against a 'soft' wheel could be trouble. Then there is the cost of a new wheel of course.
Now I am not familiar with the Creusen grinders, is the shaft long enough, course it is, for a 40mm wheel? I do not recall seeing one. Can I assume the white wheel to be a cool running one?
xy
 

Phil Pascoe

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Yes. it comes with a 40mm wheel on one side - of course, the side it's on changes if it's reversed.
I'm just putting it back together - I didn't have a problem except for breaking the plate the power lead goes in through - I couldn't see how to get it out without taking everything apart. I've anchored the flex inside, so I'll just make up a cover to keep the dust out. There has to be less chance of damaging the wheels with a trailing tool.
 

Phil Pascoe

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I think the only difference from one side to the other is the width of the covers - the 40mm wheel itself is dished and would fit either side. It's running, but I need to either re tap the holes in the covers a size larger - they've been cross threaded (not guilty, second hand machine), JB weld some thin nuts inside or just drill some new holes and use self tappers. My taps and dies are inaccessible at the moment so it'll have to wait until tomorrow. I doubt there's room with a new wheel to pop rivet otherwise I'd do that.
 

xy mosian

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The dished wheel must be a help, but the stripped threads. :x One of the curses of battery screwdrivers, not neccessarily in your case, is stripped threads. A recent service of our gas fire had the fitter complaining of threads stripped on his previous job. Self tappers driven about eight turns too far. He had a tough job just getting the case off. When I read your post I was going to suggest self tappers, but there may not be enough clearance, there's quite a lot of the self tapper before getting to the active part.
You're getting there and if you're anything like me the sense of achievement will make it all seem whorthwhile.
xy
 

Phil Pascoe

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The existing holes are 5mm, and there's not clearance for self tappers or pop rivets - ideally I'd just rivet it closed and drill them out when needs be. The actual steel isn't very thick - I may well braze some thin nuts on the inside and have done with it. Come to that, I could braze nuts to the outside keeping them full thickness and then grind cones on the ends of the set screws to align them with the existing holes.
 

xy mosian

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phil.p":1eiycp52 said:
Come to that, I could braze nuts to the outside keeping them full thickness and then grind cones on the ends of the set screws to align them with the existing holes.
That would be impressively accurate positioning and brazing. Still fortune favours the brave and all that, go for it.
xy
 

Phil Pascoe

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Not really - the set screws wouldn't need to align with an internal thread, just seat in the hole - so long as the three were tightened gradually the spacing wouldn't be microscopically important. The more I think about it the more I'm inclined to epoxy thin nuts on the inside.
 

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I have a small Creusen I got from an old turner that runs in reverse.
 

xy mosian

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phil.p":18jer81q said:
Not really - the set screws wouldn't need to align with an internal thread, just seat in the hole - so long as the three were tightened gradually the spacing wouldn't be microscopically important. The more I think about it the more I'm inclined to epoxy thin nuts on the inside.
Sorry Phil, I've been soting a friends mulitask printer thingy, at a distance. You are, of course, right about the hole alignment. Now the epoxyied nuts, oooo, sound like the way to go. I'll keep my fingers crossed for your success.
xy
 

Phil Pascoe

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DSCF0211.JPG

Up and running backwards. I managed to get the holes tapped to 6mm, the steel is just thick enough to take the thread without stripping. I got some 6mm square nuts to use, but thought the beginning was a better place to start. :D
 

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My kitchen knife sharpening grinder runs is reverse, I adjust the position of the guards and just turn it around, no big deal to reach around to use the switch. Very useful grinder and much safer to use it that way.
 
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