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Jez

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I might sound dumb here, but i can sharpen chisels at collage, with the stone provided, but im going to be purchasing my own chisels (thanks for advice guys) and im wondering which stone would be best.

Would a japanese water stone be ok ? http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp? ... 88&recno=5

thanks (sorry for being a novi :x)
 

Rob Lee

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Jez":3lkerilt said:
I might sound dumb here, but i can sharpen chisels at collage, with the stone provided, but im going to be purchasing my own chisels (thanks for advice guys) and im wondering which stone would be best.

Would a japanese water stone be ok ? http://www.axminster.co.uk/product.asp? ... 88&recno=5

thanks (sorry for being a novi :x)
Hi -

Those are the two stones I've been using for 15yrs plus... a good affordable choice!

The 800X stone is thick enough that you can use the sides with narrow chisels and gouges... Mark 1 large side for wide tools, and 1 side for less wide chisels... that way you'll always have a side that stays truer, longer. The 800x can also be used to dress the 6000x stone... you can dress the 800x with silicon carbide paper on a flat surface.

I think it's a great bang for the buck...

Cheers -

Rob
 

Steve Maskery

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Jez
There are lots of options available to you. Waterstones can be very expensive, but that kit seems very reasonable indeed. I'm pretty sure that I paid a lot more than that for one stone back in, well, the stone age. Until recently they have gathered dust, sticking with the Arkansa oil stone my dad gave me.

I'm slowly getting to like the waterstones, but they are MESSY. I use them in the kitchen, on the drainng board, using one of those non-slip mats. The only reson I'm getting to like them is that I'm also using a good honing jig. When I used to try to do them freehand I found I dug in and marred the stones.

Another option you may wish to try is Scary Sharp. There is loads of stuff on the Internet about it. You need a range of SiC papers and a good piece of flat glass or marble. Quick, excellent and CHEAP. Again, I'd recommend a guide jig though, as its very easy to rip the papers.

HTH
Steve
 

Jez

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Thanks for the comments :D

The stone at collage is an oil stone, and i have never used a waterstone before, is there anything i have to do to maintain it ? does it come with instructions ?
Would it just be better to get an oilstone or would you still recommend a waterstone?

thanks again :D
 

wizer

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I have just bought this kit, but have not used it yet. I found lots of usefull advise on this forum by searching for 'waterstones'.
 

wizer

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Steve: which jig are you using?
 

JFC

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Ive used a diamond stone for the last few years and recently gone back to indian oil stone ive found the india stone is giving better results . I think the one you have at collage will be an indian oil stone on a horizontal grinding bench ?
 

Steve Maskery

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Wizer
I'm using the new Veritas Mk II jig. Very good for chisels and square blades for shooting boards, struggling to use it to get a nice even camber on a bench plane, especially a Bevel Up one, where you need a greater camber to get the same effect than with a standard plane, because the blade itself is at a lower angle.

Jez
Waterstones are softer, much softer, than oilstones. They wear faster and need to be flattened much more often. On the other hand they are much easier to get flat.
In normal use, the only thing you have to do is soak them in water for a few minutes (til the bubbles stop rising) before you use them, otherwise the water just soaks straight in and the stone is dry again in no time.

Cheers
Steve

Cheers
Steve
 

Philly

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Steve
I've found the best way to camber a blade using the Mk II is to NEVER flatten your waterstones :lol:
Might not be cambered the way you want, though :wink:
Ignore me,
Philly :D
 

Alf

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Up the proverbial creek
Steve,

You may find the best way to camber a blade using the Mk II is to save up and have patience. <Nudge, nudge, wink, wink. :wink: >

Cheers, Alf
 
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