Coronet Herald and Tools advice

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Crocks

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I’m on the cusp of getting the Coronet Herald and was looking for advice on the stand or bench feet option. I’ve seen videos on YouTube with both and even no bench feet at all. I’m limited for space so mounting on a movable base with lowering casters so it sits on the floor is one possible plan or building storage under the stand? Any thoughts welcome.
Also I’ll need to get some tools. I’m currently using a schools Union Graduate lathe and the evening classes tool set. I see Axminster do a set of 6 for about £120 or eBay always has second hand sets again any help with what I need to consider would help.
 

Phil Pascoe

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Many clubs keep five tools on each lathe, which cover 90%+ of turning. A skew, a roughing gouge, a spindle gouge, a bowl gouge and a parting tool - everything else is used much less often. You can make skews and scrapers out of hss bar bought on line - there's no need to spend a fortune on them. Be careful when looking at ebay - many of the tools are carbon steel not hss, which is fine as long as they're not charging for hss.
 

Duncan A

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The supplied stand is pretty poor in my opinion and the splayed legs take up a fair bit of room. Best to mount the lathe on a solid wooden bench and incorporate shelves to add mass to the lathe and storage space to your workshop
Duncan
 

Richard_C

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A lot of stands are standard size for standard sized people, some are adjustable with limited range. If you are non standard sized (no need to tell us), a DIY answer might be better.
 

akirk

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I have that lathe on the supplied legs.
They are fine - they can be filled with dry sand if you want to add mass, but I have found little need.
However, they do splay, and make space usage awkward - I am considering mounting it on a bench - however, it is worth considering if you wish to turn the headstock and turn off bed for larger items then you would need to ensure that it is mounted to allow that...

As for tools - if you can afford the Sorby starter set of 6 chisels, it is very good
 

Crocks

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thanks all I really appreciate your advice. The turning headstock space is a great thought Akirk thanks
 

Lazurus

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Go for second hand Sorby tools, if you buy a set there will always be one or two you don't need initially. Start of with the basics a roughing gouge (19mm) 3/8 bowl and spindle gouge and a parting tool, these will cover most jobs initially. Save getting a skew until you have some experience as they bite!
 

EvaBeaver

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I have that lathe on the supplied legs.
They are fine - they can be filled with dry sand if you want to add mass, but I have found little need.
However, they do splay, and make space usage awkward - I am considering mounting it on a bench - however, it is worth considering if you wish to turn the headstock and turn off bed for larger items then you would need to ensure that it is mounted to allow that...

As for tools - if you can afford the Sorby starter set of 6 chisels, it is very good
Got the same. The legs are ok but better if bolted down rather than just resting on the supplied rubber feet. The sorbry starter set is great and I have used all of them so far but have purchased a larger scraper and bowl gouge from crown for larger bowls. Can't fault either products overall but this is my first lathe so I don't have anything to compare against.
 

Crocks

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Thanks it’s my first lathe too but I’ve been researching (procrastinating) for ages. I was going for the 305 range Axminster, Rutlands or Record power but then I read the comments here when I joined which recommended going for a bigger lathe, ‘ a year after purchasing it, it will be to small’. So I’m plundering my savings. I’ve been offered a set of Sorby tools from posting this thread (at a reasonable rate) 😊
 

skeetstar

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I looked at the supplied legs, but built my own bench. Advantages are you can build it to your own height, build in shelving for bits and pieces, and I've put racking at each end for my tools. It wasn't hugely expensive, I used a mix of decent timber and pallet wood. Beware though if you do build your own, you still need to buy the 'feet' to set it on.
I've found yandles first class for advice, guidance, price etc., but their shipping department is useless, missed dates, lost instructions and so on.
 

Crocks

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I looked at the supplied legs, but built my own bench. Advantages are you can build it to your own height, build in shelving for bits and pieces, and I've put racking at each end for my tools. It wasn't hugely expensive, I used a mix of decent timber and pallet wood. Beware though if you do build your own, you still need to buy the 'feet' to set it on.
I've found yandles first class for advice, guidance, price etc., but their shipping department is useless, missed dates, lost instructions and so on.
I appreciate the bench feet are going to have to be included. I’m not far from Snainton so I’m going to develop that relationship. Thanks
 

Sachakins

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I went for bench feet and made a simple 2x4 bench with storage under for heavy stuff as ballast.
Preferred this route, as able to get turning height to suit me.
 

Orraloon

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I would build a solid wood bench for it. Solid being the key word. There is a school of thought that wood absorbs the vibrations better than metal legs will. I followed the plan in Keith Rowley's book ''Woodturning a foundation course''. Built it for a Record DML 24 but its still in service with a bigger lathe on it now. As others have said build it at the height you like and you have space for tools and storage.
IMG_1673.JPG
Regards
John
 

Crocks

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I have that book and the dvd. I’ve gone for the Alan Lacer design and put it on lowering casters
 

clogs

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Orraloon is dead right.....get heavy timber for the frame and top.....
build in a small cupboard with slide out shelves.....chucks are heavy....
I don't like drawers on a lathe...they can open and the [email protected] still gets in....
as for feet there are HD adjustable feet available on the bay.....although I make my own.....
 

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