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copper powder

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alexf

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I have been asked to make a goblet and use copper to enhance the look of it. I have coated the inside with a copper powder and resin mix, (by weight 2 copper to 1 resin). I have also put the same mix on a couple of bands on the outside. I am disapointed with the finish I get on the copper. It is not as bright as I had hoped although I have managed to get a good smooth finish and polish on the whole goblet.

Does anyone have any experience with this type of finish who can give me some advice. I don't mind starting again from scratch. Please bear in mind that the finished goblet is to be used for communion wine.
 

nev

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I can offer no real help #-o but .. is it possible to use a copper leaf, sealed in some way? I was reading this and the sealer they use is fairly resistant to most things?
may be worth looking into?
 

Elapid

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Maybe you could coat it in a good chrome paint and then add a copper clear coat over the top?
 

Blister

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Please bear in mind that the finished goblet is to be used for communion wine
This could cause all sorts of problems re human consumption and discolouring

Maybe contact someone who does metal spinning

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsGVPUGMPXM

you could turn one in copper and fix it to a wooden base :wink:
 

wallace

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I once tried to fill a void with brass powder and resin and it turned out pants, it just looked like brown slurry. When you say copper, are you after the bright copper or the green tarnished copper affect. If green, then maybe verdigris and then cover with rustins. But I doubt the rustins would cover the verdigris. I have had good results with brass powder and CA, then sanded and buffed. I dont know if any of that helps.
Mark
 

mikec

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I have done some inlay work with various metal powders. To get a good metallic finish you need to add a lot of metal powder until the mixture is like a stiff paste.

This will polish like the real metal but your problem will be with minute air holes. You may have to go over the metallic fill several times. You will never really get the same deep shine as the true metal so copper leaf may be the best solution with a melamine coating to protect the metal and make it safe for human use. Alternatively as has been suggested, try making the body using metal spinning techniques.

Regards,

mikec
 

János

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Hello,

You should use real gold leaf for the inside of your chalice, for food safety. And real gold will not tarnish with time or use. As a protection against rapid wear you might use "double gold", a thicker grade of gold foil. For in-fills on the outside you should use a relatively coarse copper powder, something like coarse sand, and not the powdery grade, used as pigment in paints.

Have a nice day,

János
 
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