Compound sled

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So I've just made this compound sled. The idea being that the blade will be tilted to 45, and then you can set the fence on the sled to any angle, using a square for 90, or a bevel gauge for another angle.

However, bit of an oversight. Due to the zero clearance 45 degree cut. I now can't butt up a square or bevel gauge against it to set my angle.

The only thing I can think of is setting the blade back to 90, setting the fence first, and then setting the blade back to 45. Bit annoying though. I'd really rather just reference the zero clearance side.

The other option would be to not have the 45 zero clearance, and just have a straight 90 edge. But how do I do that without taking it apart and losing my parallel setting with the blade?
 

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baldkev

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Im not sure i understand 100%......
To set the bevel of the blade itself ( vertical adjust ) you can use your table saw ° marker and if you want to line a bevel up in the other direction, cant you just use the edge of the sled as a reference? Its at 45 vertically, but in line with the blade, so as long as it isnt worn, it should be accurate / parallel to the blade

Edit: clarification on vertical adjustment
 

Orraloon

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Provided both sides of the base are parallel then use the square or bevel gauge from the other side to set the fence. Angles when line bisects 2 parallel lines being the same. Had to cast way way back to school geometry for that.
Regards
John
 

Doug B

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Or alternatively if your T track is parallel to the blade plane a 6” piece of wood so as to be a snug fit into the track allowing it to stick an inch above the surface of the sled & use that as a reference for your bevel gauge.
 
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...and if you want to line a bevel up in the other direction, cant you just use the edge of the sled as a reference?

Thats the problem, the reference side has a mitre on it. I thought I could still use a square/gauge against it, but it's not stable enough to take an accurate measurement. If you mean use the other side, see the my comment below.

Provided both sides of the base are parallel then use the square or bevel gauge from the other side to set the fence. Angles when line bisects 2 parallel lines being the same. Had to cast way way back to school geometry for that.
Regards
John

I can't really do that accurately though, as even if I did cut the board pefectly parallel to begin with , I still have to attach the mitre runner and make that perfectly parallel. And then it means the fence needs to be perfectly parallel. And as you're measuring on the other side, you now need a really long sqaure/gauage. It's just more variables of error. You really want to to reference everything off the initial cut.

Or alternatively if your T track is parallel to the blade plane a 6” piece of wood so as to be a snug fit into the track allowing it to stick an inch above the surface of the sled & use that as a reference for your bevel gauge.

I suppose I could make the runner underneath adjustbale so I can fettle it until it's parallel with the blade.
 

TheTiddles

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Thats the problem, the reference side has a mitre on it. I thought I could still use a square/gauge against it, but it's not stable enough to take an accurate measurement. If you mean use the other side, see the my comment below.



I can't really do that accurately though, as even if I did cut the board pefectly parallel to begin with , I still have to attach the mitre runner and make that perfectly parallel. And then it means the fence needs to be perfectly parallel. And as you're measuring on the other side, you now need a really long sqaure/gauage. It's just more variables of error. You really want to to reference everything off the initial cut.



I suppose I could make the runner underneath adjustbale so I can fettle it until it's parallel with the blade.
It’s more common to adjust the blade to parallel with the mitre track. Then once you’ve done that get a new blade guard made up before using it

Aidan
 
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The blade is parallel with the mitre slot.

Edit : Thought you meant the table saw mitre slots
 
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