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74extiger

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Following the announcement of the new Domino technology (in Europe only), has there been further information? In the United States, the Festool people are saying nothing. Like the Biscuit Jointer made by Bosch, the Festool could be restricted to sales in Europe only.

I'm waiting in the wings, trying to decide if I should buy a Lamello, or wait for something that is possibly superior in function. The concept of tenons that swell with glue appeals to me.

Gary Curtis
California --- with torrential rains this week :)
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Gary

The only place that I've read anything is in the Festool Owners Group.

Just try this link which has a search for Domino included.

It surely is only a matter of time before the product becomes available in the US.

Happy New Year
Neil
 

bg

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Hi 74extiger,

I purchased a Domino from Festool back in October at our Tools 05 show. However the delivery was not until Jan, so I hope it will come any week now. Festool gave a very impressive demo. I was looking for a Dowling jig, but the Domino loose tenons can be used in place of dowels, biscuits and small tenons. It had a facility to position for the next ‘mortise’, but to alter the ‘slop’ so the tenons could have a sloppy biscuit fit, or an exact dowel fit. However as its not yet actually delivered in UK I cant give any more info at this point.
Regards
BG
 

74extiger

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Bernard,

I hope you'll post a note with your evaluation of the Festool when it arrives.
I'm in no hurry, but I will wait before buying a biscuit jointer. I want to know if the Domino tenons have advantages.

You mentioned dowels. The only person I know using them has a large industrial boring machine to drills tandem holes for dowels. Mafell sells one that is hand-held, but quite expensive. Dowels are not too popular in woodworking circles here in N. America.

Awaiting your commentary.

Gary Curtis
 

bg

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Hi Gary
I'll post some more info when I get to use it, but this may not be for a couple of months due to a working abroad for a short while.
BG
 

Neil

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Yep, thats it - eye-wateringly expensive of course!

Neil
 

Neil

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Newbie_Neil":3u5zaqk6 said:
So when are you placing your order? :lol:
I'll get back to you on that one, Neil! :lol:

Seriously, though, I would get the Leigh FMT rather than this if I had that sort of money - I can see how useful it would be on-site, but for workshop use there are better (and much cheaper) ways to achieve the same result IMO.

Cheers,
Neil
 

Newbie_Neil

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Neil":2k5bs9qc said:
Seriously, though, I would get the Leigh FMT rather than this if I had that sort of money.
Now you're talking my language.

Neil":2k5bs9qc said:
I can see how useful it would be on-site, but for workshop use there are better (and much cheaper) ways to achieve the same result IMO.
A compromise might be to buy the Domino dowels and then just use a router. The smallest size are just two pence each at Axminster.

Cheers
Neil
 

Neil

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Newbie_Neil":265w5wcl said:
A compromise might be to buy the Domino dowels and then just use a router. The smallest size are just two pence each at Axminster.
Thats a very good idea - presumably they are compressed like biscuits, so they will swell up with the glue and make a really strong joint?

Neil
 

Newbie_Neil

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Neil":2afbqb6f said:
presumably they are compressed like biscuits, so they will swell up with the glue and make a really strong joint?
Yes.

The Festool site says "Thanks to the shape of the DOMINO dowel you get maximum stability, as it is designed with expanding glue slots and side grooves.

Cheers
Neil
 

Scrit

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For the price of a Domino you can buy a reasonable square chisel mortiser (make that a GOOD SCM if you can find a s/hand Multico M or Sedgwick). Can't understand the attraction, especially as you will have to live with proprietary loose tenons for a while.

Just playing the devil's advocate here, guys

Scrit
 

SimonA

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Thats a bloody good idea Neil....I might see if I can get a hold of the smaller packets from Festool and give it a shot.....

Cheers

SimonA
 
A

Anonymous

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For the price of that Festool, you could get a lot of decent and more useful tools :?

Is it just me that thinks this is a lot for a dowel hole cutter? even a fancy one
 

Chris Knight

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Tony,
I think it is way too soon to knock it. Look at the Festool plunge saw. At one level it is just an overpriced circular saw. At another it's a different beast altogether that thousands of pros, who count their pennies, swear by. I see no reason at this stage why this tool should not be as useful.
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Simon

SimonA":1shs4kqu said:
I might see if I can get a hold of the smaller packets from Festool and give it a shot.....
Yes, that's exactly what I was thinking.

The system is obviously aimed at site work and this is reinforced by the fact that the packet of the smallest size biscuits contains 1,800, yes eighteen hundred, and costs 44.52 from Axminster. The unit cost is cheap but you do have to make a big investment to get onboard.

Cheers
Neil
 

Newbie_Neil

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Hi Scrit

Scrit":jfizba0u said:
Can't understand the attraction, especially as you will have to live with proprietary loose tenons for a while.

Just playing the devil's advocate here, guys
I think Chris has hit the nail on the head with his thoughts that it's aimed at site work. I believe we're all agreed that the money could be better spent in a workshop environment.

I was investigating using the Domino biscuits as loose tenons. It would be stable with a consistent size and a low unit cost. The big downside is the size of pack, which means you're into spending nearly fifty pounds per size that you want to use. I don't know what the assorted pack contains, but that is 120 pounds.

Cheers
Neil
 
A

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waterhead37":27ioxlo3 said:
Tony,
I think it is way too soon to knock it. Look at the Festool plunge saw. At one level it is just an overpriced circular saw. At another it's a different beast altogether that thousands of pros, who count their pennies, swear by. I see no reason at this stage why this tool should not be as useful.
Fair point Chris.
 

Scrit

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Newbie_Neil":3b2rx4vb said:
Scrit":3b2rx4vb said:
Can't understand the attraction, especially as you will have to live with proprietary loose tenons for a while.
I think Chris has hit the nail on the head with his thoughts that it's aimed at site work.
And there's the rub. What sort of site work would that be? Given that stuff like frame and panel work or doors is normally done in a fixed shop (even if on site), dismantled then installed I am still struggling with this one. As a piece of kit it is much more expensive than a plunge saw (first made by Elu in the 1960s as it happens) or even the Mafell DD40 doweller (another limited use machine). I've made up M&T gates on site a few times, but I've been able to plan things so that the bulk of the joint cutting was done in the shop, So would it be more useful than the Charnwood freehand mortiser, for example? And would it really be worth the extra?

Scrit
 
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